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Professor Predicts Trump Voters Will Riot When He Leaves Office

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  1. TaiShang

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    Professor Predicts Trump Voters Will Riot When He Leaves Office


    Thu, 08/09/2018

    Authored by Toni Airkasinen via Campus Reform,

    A women’s studies professor at the University of Albany recently published a lengthy essay warning that Trump voters will likely riot when he departs from the Oval Office.

    How Do We Solve a Problem Like the Donald? The Democratic Challenge of Trump Voters and the Politics of Presidential Removal” was published in the recent issue of the journal New Political Scienceby Julie Novkov.

    Novkov, who also teaches political science, highlights the potential for Trump to be removed by impeachment, resignation, or assassination—but what she is most concerned about is how Trump voters would react to such an outcome.

    The Trump coalition is bound together by “white racial resentment, anxiety and anger about immigration, some rural consciousness, and commitment to conservative Christian values,”Novkov claims, asserting that Trump voters are also easily misled.

    “Distrustful and cynical, they are ready to embrace any simple system that makes sense of their world and validates their resentments,” she writes, adding that such people are “particularly inclined to embrace propaganda.”

    Because of this, Novkov anticipates that Trump voters will resist the prospect of his removal from office, perhaps even with violence.

    “I believe that Trumpers—the core supporters Trump has bound to himself through his consistent and persistent messaging—will not accept as legitimate any means through which he departs from the presidency,” Novkov writes, clarifying that she believes this will be so even if Trump completes two full terms in office.

    “Impeachment or Twenty-Fifth Amendment removal proceedings will be furiously denounced as illegitimate. If he resigns, they will spin narratives about the deep state’s conspiracy against him. If he makes it to 2020 and fails to win re-election, they will believe that the election was illegitimate, probably with some narrative about illegal voters,” she predicts.

    “Even if he makes it through two terms, they will vociferously demand that he be permitted a third. If he dies, they will believe he has been assassinated.”

    “The identity they have constructed, crystallized by Trump, is so emotionally powerful to them and so empowering that it is likely to be impervious to ordinary or even extraordinary forms of political argumentation,” she adds in the unabridged print version of the article.

    “The real questions remaining are how they will respond to his departure, in whatever manner it comes, and whether their response will entail violence, and if so, how much state violence will be necessary in response to maintain order,” Novkov asserts.

    The best-case scenario that could arise from “the continued political incorporation of Trumpers as a group,” she says, is that it “might shift some areas of the country back to the political configuration common in some areas of the American south in the 1920s, when gaudy populist racism vied with conservative, racist legitimation projects for hegemony entirely within the Democratic Party.”

    “At worst, this group could provoke violence and place the nation in the position of having to engage in its violent suppression,” she adds.

    “If the Trumpers cannot be disaggregated, reintegrated, or politically neutralized, the solutions available do not lie in the Constitution” because constitutional structures “cannot fix broken politics,” Novkov concludes. “Rather, we are left with hopefully a lesser form of the tragic choices posed by constitutional failure; facing the critical election of 1860, the nation ultimately chose to drown in blood over the uncertain path of constitutional union symbolized by John Bell.”

    Novkov did not respond to requests for comment. She is scheduled to teach an undergraduate class on American Federalism and a graduate-level Field Seminar in Public Law during the upcoming Fall semester.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018...trump-voters-will-riots-when-he-leaves-office
     
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    Hate, white supremacist propaganda at high level since Charlottesville: Experts

    By AARON KATERSKY
    Aug 9, 2018,

    Hate and white supremacist propaganda have been at a high level in the year since the streets of Charlottesville erupted in deadly violence, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

    On Thursday, the ADL unveiled a first-of-its-kind interactive map documenting extremist and hate incidents in the United States.

    The map includes anti-Semitic incidents, white supremacist rallies, extremist shootouts with police, extremist-related murders and extremist plots and attacks.

    The ADL documented more than 3,000 incidents of extremism or anti-Semitism in the U.S. in 2017 and 2018. Most of the activity was concentrated in the eastern part of the country.



    [​IMG]ADL

    The Anti-Defamation League released a map that the group says includes anti-Semitic incidents, white supremacist rallies, extremist shootouts with police, extremist-related murders and extremist plots and attacks.

    George Selim is the ADL's senior vice president and a former Department of Homeland Security official who led outreach programs to Muslim-American communities to try to prevent radical extremism.

    Selim told ABC News that the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville last year was "very significant because it’s the first time that white supremacy really, since the civil rights movement, entered the public square."


    [​IMG]Bebeto Matthews/AP Photo
    Two young men who left a nearby synagogue watch police activity outside the Jewish Children's Museum following a bomb threat in Brooklyn borough of New York, March 9, 2017.more +


    On Aug. 11, 2017, white supremacists descended on Charlottesville for the next day's Unite the Right rally, the stated purpose of which was to protest the planned removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The debate over what to do with Confederate monuments had been brewing across the country, but Charlottesville became a touchpoint.


    The weekend devolved into verbal and physical attacks between white supremacist groups and counter-protesters, turning deadly when a 20-year-old Ohio man allegedly accelerated his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and leaving 19 others injured, five critically.

    Two Virginia State Police troopers were killed when their helicopter crashed outside of Charlottesville. The troopers, Lt. H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, were lending air support in response to the violence in Charlottesville.


    [​IMG]Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, FILE
    White nationalists, neo-Nazis, the KKK and members of the "alt-right" attack each other as a counter protester (R) intervenes during the melee outside Emancipation Park during the Unite the Right rally, Aug. 12, 2017, in Charlottesville, Va.more +


    James Alex Fields, the alleged driver in the incident, was indicted earlier this summer on federal hate crimes charges. Fields has pleaded not guilty to those charges and has also been charged under Virginia law with murder and other crimes. Fields is currently in jail awaiting trial.

    In the months since Charlottesville, white supremacist propaganda has hit an even higher level, the ADL found. So far in 2018, the organization's Center on Extremism has tracked nearly 500 white supremacist propaganda incidents, more than in all of 2017.

    Since Aug. 12, 2017, the ADL has tracked 54 public events attended by white supremacists, including a recent demonstration on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama and a flash demonstration at the Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee.


    The ADL also tracked an increase over the past year in white supremacist propaganda efforts, including anonymous visits to university campuses to put up flyers and the draping of banners from freeway overpasses.

    "White supremacy in this country is not going away," said Selim. "We’ve seen them evolve their tactics and techniques online. We’ve seen them effectively use social media to launch and spread their ideas."


    [​IMG]Mark Makela/Getty Images
    A television reporter broadcasts in front of vandalized Jewish tombstones at Mount Carmel Cemetery Feb. 27, 2017 in Philadelphia.

    But the public outcry over Charlottesville also has resulted in some prominent white supremacists retreating from public view to the safer confines of the internet.

    "The best of America comes out in times like this," Selim said. "We see the values and virtues of tolerance and pluralism and inclusion on display in times where we see the most significant levels of hatred and bigotry and anti-Semitism."



    https://abcnews.go.com/US/hate-whit...vel-charlottesville-experts/story?id=57121128