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Pakistan's spy agency ISI faces court over disappearances

Discussion in 'Social & Current Events' started by Mblaze, Feb 10, 2012.

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  1. Mblaze

    Mblaze FULL MEMBER

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    Pakistan's spy agency ISI faces court over disappearances

    Inter-Services Intelligence accused of kidnapping and torturing 11 men, four of whom have been found dead

    Saeed Shah in Islamabad

    Families of the missing men have petitioned the supreme court, above, for their return, accusing ISI of abduction and torture. Photograph: T Mughal/EPA

    Pakistan's all-powerful military will this week face a rare challenge by the courts over the case of 11 men who were allegedly abducted and tortured by the Inter-Services Intelligence spy agency .

    The case, due to be heard on Friday, will offer a window into the workings of the ISI and its sister agency, Military Intelligence, and charges that they have made hundreds of Pakistanis disappear.


    Four of the 11 men kidnapped from the high security Adiala jail in Rawalpindi in May 2010 have turned up dead in recent months. The families of the rest are petitioning the court for their return. Although apparently terrorist suspects, they have not been charged with any crime.

    Before the hearing, the military stated in a written response to the court that they would not bring the remaining men before the judges, as had been ordered by the court, arguing that some were in such poor health that they could not be produced. Critics said this only confirmed the allegations of mistreatment.

    The case is also a test for the supreme court, which is accused of pursuing a single-minded campaign against President Asif Zardari and his government, an agenda that plays into the hands of the military.

    "This is a historic case. It is the first time the ISI has confessed to holding people," said Amina Janjua, chairperson of Defence of Human Rights, a group that campaigns for Pakistan's disappeared. "The courts are nothing in front of the agencies. The agencies think they are the masters. The ones who were killed did not die natural deaths. Their bodies were blue and black."

    The intelligence agencies are allegedly responsible for over 1,000 disappearances since 2001, of whom about 500 are still missing, while in the western province of Baluchistan, dumped bodies of dissidents are regularly found.


    Four of the remaining seven detainees in this case are now being held at the Lady Reading hospital in Peshawar, while the three others are being kept at a facility in Parachinar, a tribal area close to the Afghan border.

    Abdul Qudoos, the brother of three of the detainees, said he believed they had been given "slow poison". In January this year his family received a phone call to pick up the body of one of his brothers, Abdur Saboor, 29, from an ambulance parked outside Peshawar. "His arms were as thin as sugar cane. Just a skull and skin left of him," said Qudoos.

    Lawyers for the ISI told the court that those kept at the hospital were not in a condition to be produced before the court, while those held in Parachinar could be brought only after a "highly confidential" letter from the "internment authority" is considered by the court.

    "The allegation of poison and torture, contained in the petition [from the families] is without any shred of evidence," the military's response said. "These are wild, diabolical and vicious allegations against a superior agency of the country."

    The military claims that the men, who were ordered to be freed by the courts from Adiala jail, were abducted by people pretending to be intelligence agents and says that it rescued them during anti-Taliban operations in the tribal area.

    "These men were in good condition. How did their health deteriorate?" said Inam ul Rahiem, a lawyer for the families.

    According to the families, all the men were picked up by intelligence agents in late 2007 and early 2008 and abducted by the spy agencies a second time, from the jail. The men were all highly religious and many were associated with Islamabad's radical Red Mosque. Qudoos's brothers used to supply the mosque with copies of the Qur'an and other religious texts.

    "The lies of the agencies have been exposed but they keep telling them," said Qudoos. "These private jails and torture cells, which are in every district, must be closed."


    Pakistan's spy agency ISI faces court over disappearances | World news | guardian.co.uk
     
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  2. pak-marine

    pak-marine ELITE MEMBER

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    Great bring these scum bags to court and order sever punishment to them and their superior .... this time hope to see judges and generals fight
     
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  3. Omar1984

    Omar1984 ELITE MEMBER

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    This is stupid. Have you ever heard the CIA being taken to court or RAW being taken to court when they do more human right violation in Kashmir, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

    Pakistanis are so stupid. They don't realize that ISI and Pak Army are the only people holding the country together. There are enemies all around Pakistan coming from Afghanistan trained by CIA and RAW to break the country. Let ISI do its job and eliminate all the troublemakers from the country.
     
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  4. Tameem

    Tameem SENIOR MEMBER

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    I believe, people are now learning fast that Patriotism only means to love Pakistan as a whole not any institutions of it over others.
     
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  5. pakistanitarzan

    pakistanitarzan FULL MEMBER

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    Omar Bhaijaan, You couldn't have said it any better! :)
     
  6. Omar1984

    Omar1984 ELITE MEMBER

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    Its about survival not patriotism. Just yesterday the U.S. held a hearing on Balochistan and U.S. congressmen were saying that Independent Balochistan would be good for U.S., India is in Afghanistan, the same India that helped East Pakistan break away from Pakistan in 1971. ISI is the only institution that is countering U.S. and India's plans.

    If you want Pakistan to go from this in 1947,
    [​IMG]

    to this,
    [​IMG]

    Then go ahead and weaken the ISI. Just remember that U.S. and India are not in Afghanistan to help the Afghan people, they have bigger goals in the region that involves Pakistan. Only a strong ISI can counter their plans. We already lost a chunck of the country in 1971 because we acted too late...don't make the same mistake today. We should destroy the insurgency before it gains strength, or else we will be left with a small broken piece of Pakistan with no strategic value that has the largest population concentration in the country today, and that will be a puppet of India like Nepal, Bhutan, and Bangladesh.
     
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  7. Tameem

    Tameem SENIOR MEMBER

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    Omar...if you write your name on some sacred book it doesn't make you sacred...does it??

    Why don't you try to safe someone's ***** just because they makes its of Pakistan's...???

    We needs to separate both thing very delicately.....no doubt about it....!!!
     
  8. hembo

    hembo SENIOR MEMBER

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    Attorney: Pakistani high court gives spy agency ultimatum
    By Reza Sayah, CNN
    February 10, 2012 -- Updated 1012 GMT (1812 HKT)

    Islamabad, Pakistan (CNN) -- Pakistan's Supreme Court gave the country's secretive and powerful spy agency a midnight deadline to hand over seven detainees who were allegedly arrested without due process and injured while in its custody, a lawyer representing several of the detainees told CNN Friday.

    A three-judge panel delivered the ultimatum after a lawyer representing the ISI, or Inter-Services Intelligence, failed to bring the detainees to court as earlier ordered.

    "The court wants the detainees in court today and they're not accepting any excuses," said attorney Tariq Asad. "The court has said they have until midnight to produce the detainees, even if it means bringing them to court in a helicopter."

    The court did not make clear what the consequences would be if ISI failed to produce the detainees by the end of the day.
    Long thought to be untouchable, the spy agency has been ordered to produce the men it's accused of holding since 2010 and explaining the deaths of four other detainees.

    Pakistani mom takes on spy agency

    On Thursday, the spy agency's lawyer presented the court with medical certificates for four of them to show they were hospitalized, and he asked permission from the court to present confidential letters explaining the whereabouts of the other three men, Asad said.

    One of the dead detainees is Abdul Saboor. The ISI blamed the 29-year-old's death on natural causes, but his mother said scars on his body prove the agency tortured and killed her son.

    "He had so many marks on his body," Rohaifa Bibi said, pointing to numerous scars in a picture of her son's corpse. "When they showed me the body, he was just skin and bones."

    Saboor and his brothers were law abiding citizens who printed Korans at a shop in Lahore, Asad said. He did acknowledge that all of the detainees were suspects in several militant attacks, but said they were acquitted of the charges in 2010.

    A lawyer for the ISI told the Supreme Court that the spy agency did detain the men for further questioning but said they were set free. The ISI denies any role in their deaths and holds to its claim that they died of natural causes.
     
  9. kink

    kink FULL MEMBER

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    You are missing the point: have you ever heard of CIA committing human rights violations of American citizens inside the US? Have you ever heard of RAW committing human rights violations of Hindus in India?

    No one in Pakistan would have raised an alarm if ISI was torturing and killing in Afghanistan or India, or if its victims were Pakistani Christians or Hindus. This is human nature that humans don't feel pain for those who are different from them in some religious or ethnic way but they do feel strongly for their own.

    There will be severe backlash in US if CIA starts doing in USA what ISI and others are doing in Pakistan!
     
  10. saiyan0321

    saiyan0321 SENIOR MEMBER

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    well i believe with all the bad the agency does alot of good but yes the courts should be the highest authority but like it or not this case is going to go nowhere like the gilani case i will be very surprised if anything happened on monday but people still think the agency is the best thing happened to pakistan and like it or not they are holding the country together make them weak the country called pakistan ceases to exist you can dream all you want but that is how it is... i dont think this case will weaken isi there hold is the best :enjoy::enjoy::enjoy:
     
  11. Omar1984

    Omar1984 ELITE MEMBER

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    U.S. does not have its neighboring countries supporting separatists/terrorists. Pakistan has an uncontrollable border with Afghanistan, with all foreign intelligence agencies present in that country.

    And RAW has committed plenty of human rights violations in India over the years. Do not think its so easy to control an insurgency. Unfortuantely sometimes you have to use force. Every intelligence agency does it.
     
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