• Thursday, May 25, 2017

Pakistan's Education system | Reforms & Upgrades.

Discussion in 'Social & Current Events' started by SekrutYakhni, Aug 15, 2010.

  1. Jit

    Jit BANNED

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    may be you cut that class! you should watch this Pakistani television report - she quotes exact area, class, book and page.
     
  2. A$HU

    A$HU FULL MEMBER

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    On a completely another topic what is your ethnicity bro?
     
  3. Paksanity

    Paksanity SENIOR MEMBER

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    I am fairly certain you have never gone through text books of Pakistan. There are no such things as you mentioned. Are we speaking from our perception, sir?

    You mentioned learning History objectively. Out of curiosity, do American text books mention atrocities of European settlers to Red Indians, Black slaves conditions, and the fact that we drove out indigenous people for their land? I wonder?!
     
  4. Jit

    Jit BANNED

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    did you not see the video I posted of Pakistanis discussing how such erroneous and hatefillied material is in public school texts ...with page numbers? just click on the link in my earlier post
     
  5. Hiptullha

    Hiptullha SENIOR MEMBER

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    A YouTube video can hardly be considered evidence. I've studied from 3 textbooks during my O' Levels, one by Nigel Kelly, another by Nigel Smith, and the last by Farooq Naseem Bajwa, each one with hardly any bigotry towards Hindus.
     
  6. Paksanity

    Paksanity SENIOR MEMBER

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    I have been educated in Pakistani system. Will you believe me?
     
  7. Hiptullha

    Hiptullha SENIOR MEMBER

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    Quiet, dirty "Arabized" Pakistani filth. Let the intelligent Indian tell you about your country.
     
  8. Leader

    Leader ELITE MEMBER

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    The Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (K-P) government is planning to remove at least 50% of public school teachers over poor performance, but not before giving them a golden handshake.

    Additional Secretary for Education Qaiser Alam told The Express Tribune the golden handshake is among the options under consideration to improve the standard of education in government-run schools.

    “Under this policy, teachers will be able to retire in an honourable manner,” he added.

    [​IMG]

    According to official data, the provincial government has spent Rs93 billion on the education department which has 125,000 teachers on its payroll. However, this has not brought the performance of government schools at par with private schools.

    As a result, the current government is chalking out a strategy to separate the grain from the chaff and only induct qualified and dedicated personnel as teachers at state-run institutes.

    Through the NTS

    Under the new plan, all teachers currently employed by the department will be expected to take the National Testing Services (NTS) exam which will be arranged at a district level. This will serve as a litmus test whereby the government can select the right people for the right posts.

    According to insiders, teachers will be expected to score at least 50% in the test. If they do not make the cut, they will be given a chance to seek retirement under the golden handshake policy, as per still unconfirmed plans.

    Alam said a series of discussions and consultations regarding the plans in the education department are under way. However, the final decision will be taken by the K-P cabinet once the approval of PTI Chairman Imran Khan has been sought.

    Farewell to arms

    Political parties have voiced reservations over arming school teachers; a decision the provincial government first announced and later took a U-turn on.

    Earlier, on Wednesday, Minister for Elementary and Secondary Education Muhammad Atif Khan denied that the government had allowed teachers to carry weapons. However, twice in January Minister for Information Mushtaq Ghani had been quoted as saying teachers would be allowed to carry licenced permits to school, where parent-teacher councils would monitor their use.

    Even after the rebuttal, members of various political parties are shocked to find this was proposed as a strategy to enhance security at schools. They are of the view that weaponising schools will strengthen the existing gun culture in the province. According to political leaders, it is time to bid farewell to arms and keep children away from them.

    “I don’t know how a child will be able to get education with an AK-47 in his teacher’s hands,” Awami National Party (ANP) Senator Baz Muhammad Khan said.

    Baz Muhammad urged the K-P government to devise a strategy to overcome militancy rather than encourage every citizen to carry arms. “This will negatively impact the minds of young schoolchildren,” he said. “I want children to hold pens rather than brandish guns.”

    Former K-P chief minister and Jamiat Ulema Islam (JUI-F) MPA Akram Khan Durrani pressed the government to consult all political parties before taking any further steps.

    “People with nefarious minds could obtain arms licences and wreak havoc,” he said. “The government, and not its citizens, is responsible for protecting the public.”

    Meanwhile, Qaumi Watan Party’s (QWP) Anisa Zeb Tahirkhili urged the government to focus on security of schools and issue licences to security guards. “Giving teachers guns will undermine the fact that a pen is mightier than a sword,” Tahirkhili said.

    Setting the record straight

    When asked, former minister of health Shaukat Yousafzai said the decision was being portrayed in a negative light. The provincial government has not allowed teachers to carry guns. However, he added that teachers will be issued licences if they approach the government.

    brilliant... poor performance will result in termination of the service...
     
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  9. Kurlang

    Kurlang FULL MEMBER

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    Interesting take. True also

     
  10. Akheilos

    Akheilos ELITE MEMBER

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    Education System Reform in Pakistan:
    Why, When, and How?

    Mehnaz Aziz
    Children’s Global Network, Pakistan
    David E. Bloom
    Harvard School of Public Health and IZA
    Salal Humair
    Harvard School of Public Health
    Emmanuel Jimenez
    IEG, World Bank
    Larry Rosenberg
    Harvard School of Public Health
    Zeba Sathar
    Population Council, Pakistan
    Policy Paper No. 76
    January 2014


    IZA
    P.O. Box 7240
    53072 Bonn
    Germany
    Phone: +49-228-3894-0
    Fax: +49-228-3894-180
    E-mail: iza@iza.org


    The IZA Policy Paper Series publishes work by IZA staff and network members with immediate
    relevance for policymakers.
    Any opinions and views on policy expressed are those of the author(s)
    and not necessarily those of IZA.
    The papers often represent preliminary work and are circulated to encourage discussion. Citation of
    such a paper should account for its provisional character. A revised version may be available directly
    from the corresponding author.

    IZA Policy Paper No. 76
    January 2014

    ABSTRACT
    Education System Reform in Pakistan: Why, When, and How?

    Pakistan’s education system faces long-standing problems in access, quality, and equal
    opportunity
    at every leve
    l: primary and secondary schools, higher education and vocational
    education. In spite of recent encouraging trends, such as the rapid spread of private
    schooling and an expansion of higher education opportunities, systemic reform remains
    stubbornly elusive
    . The inability of successive governments to reform the system has created
    severe constraints for Pakistan’s economic and societal development.
    An inability to act now
    will increase the problems manifold in the future, due to a burgeoning youth population and
    increasing competitive pressures from other developing countries that are devoting more
    attention to education.

    We discuss in this paper the imperative for education system reform in Pakistan, and
    articulate why a window of opportunity exists at this time for all stakeholders – government,
    civil society and donors – to initiate reform
    . We emphasize, however, some key messages.
    One, that reform must tackle all sectors of the education system – primary/secondary, higher
    education and vocational education – as Pakistan does not have the luxury to delay reform in
    one sector until the other sectors improve.
    Two, reform in every sector must be systemic
    i.e. with well-defined goals, focus on a minimal set of areas such as governance, financing,
    human resources, and curriculum and address them all together, rather than piecemeal.

    Three, implementation is the all-important Achilles’ heel, where Pakistan has limited
    resources and has often foundered on the rocks. But as we discuss, there are important
    examples demonstrating that success is achievable, if government and civil society have the
    will to initiate and sustain reform.



    JEL Codes: I21, I25, I28, H52
    Keywords: education, economic development, educational reform, Pakistan


    Corresponding author:
    David E. Bloom
    Department of Global Health and Population
    Harvard School of Public Health

    665 Huntington Avenue
    Building I 12th Floor, Suite 1202
    Boston, MA 02115
    USA

    E-mail: dbloom@hsph.harvard.edu


    Attached is the full 20+ pg report of the tragedy called EDUCATION IN PAKISTAN:

    http://ftp.iza.org/pp76.pdf





     
  11. Syed.Ali.Haider

    Syed.Ali.Haider ELITE MEMBER

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    A girl's school in Landi Kotal, photo posted without any comment:

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Masood Khan 1

    Masood Khan 1 FULL MEMBER

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    biggest problem plaguing our system.
     
  13. Gauss

    Gauss BANNED

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    philosophy, free from religious bias, and history, free from national bias should be introduced. these two go a long way in making an educated mind.

    definition of educated mind:[​IMG]
     
  14. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott FULL MEMBER

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    In Pakistan, only one Education system is necessary and after 18th amendment.. You give rights to provinces which is actually itself a big disaster because your nationalism will be killed.
     
  15. surya kiran

    surya kiran SENIOR MEMBER

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    Kudos to the lady teacher who is sitting and teaching there. Kudos to the parents of these girls who have sent them there. Especially, since this is FATA.

    I think, one needs to appreciate the effort being put in at the ground level before passing or comparing a school with a western standard system. While, the picture is not the best case scenario the takeaway can be that, there needs to be an active involvement of the local population to further this.

    Does Pakistan have anything like a Panchayat, which can may be build a roof for these children during the rains? Or can the parents of these children contribute (not monetarily) to build a thatched roof these children?

    The point I am trying to make is that, in rural areas, a school could be defined as a tree. What matters is, whether that tree is used to spread wisdom or not. I hope, you get my point.