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Pakistani-American Surgeon Transplants Pig Heart into A Human Patient

Hamartia Antidote

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What a way to start the year...

A 57-year-old Maryland man has become the first person to receive a heart that was grown in a genetically altered pig, according to the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), marking a medical first after years of research into whether pigs could be used to supplement a critical shortage of human organs.


David Bennett underwent a procedure that reportedly took at least seven hours at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore on Friday.

It's not known how Bennett will fare long-term, but he's doing well three days after the surgery, according to multiple reports.

Bennett had been connected to a heart-lung bypass machine prior to the surgery and remains on it, according to the New York Times, but he’s passed the 48-hour mark considered critical to determine whether the organ will be rejected.

Bennett had run out of options before the surgery: he was too ill to qualify for a human transplant and was ineligible for an artificial heart pump due to a life-threatening arrhythmia, according to UMSOM.

The Food and Drug Administration gave emergency authorization on New Year's Eve through its compassionate use provision for surgeons to take the medical gamble.

Bennett, facing certain death at the time from heart disease, asked doctors "Well, will I oink?" when they first discussed the idea of a pig heart transplant with him, Dr. Bartley Griffith told the New York Times.

CRUCIAL QUOTE
“It was either die or do this transplant,” Bennett said the day before the surgery, according to the UMSOM. “I want to live. I know it’s a shot in the dark, but it’s my last choice.”

SURPRISING FACT
Three genes responsible for human rejection were "knocked out" in the pig, according to UMSOM, while six additional genes needed for human immune acceptance were added into the pig's genome. One other gene was knocked out to ensure the pig's heart would not continue growing inside a human body.

WHAT TO WATCH FOR
Bennett could be taken off the heart-lung bypass machine on Tuesday, according to the Times.

KEY BACKGROUND
Medical researchers have long been pinning their hopes on pigs being used for life-saving human organ transplants, and had a breakthrough in October, when surgeons at NYU Langone Health in New York City successfully attached a pig kidney to a brain-dead human body. Researchers observed the kidney functioning on the body, which was on life support, for 54 hours as part of the study, leaving many hopeful that pig organs could be used on living humans. Pigs are largely seen as the animal of choice for future transplants since they can reach adult size in six months, and their heart valves have already been used for human transplants.

BIG NUMBER
17. That's how many people die in the U.S. each day while awaiting an organ transplant, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.


 
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Mista

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A great breakthrough if the patient can survive.
 

RiazHaq

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Pakistani-American heart surgeon Dr. Mohammad Mohiuddin and Dr. Bartley Griffith performed the first successful genetically-modified pig heart transplant into a human patient today at University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) hospital in Baltimore, according to the University's press release. Considered one of the world’s foremost experts on transplanting animal organs, known as xenotransplantation, Muhammad M. Mohiuddin, MD, Professor of Surgery at UMSOM, joined the UMSOM faculty five years ago and established the Cardiac Xenotransplantation Program with Dr. Griffith. Dr. Mohiuddin serves as the program’s Scientific/Program Director and Dr. Griffith as its Clinical Director.

Dr. Mohammad Mohiuddin



Dr. Mohiuddin is a 1989 graduate of the Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan. He came to the United States in the early 1990s and did a fellowship in Transplantation Biology and Immunology, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery Harrison Department of Surgical Research, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA . A practicing Muslim, he believes it is acceptable to use pig organs if it helps save human life. Some Islamic scholars have ruled that it is prohibited to use pig for organ transplants. However, almost all research in the field of xenotransplantation is now carried out using pigs. Researchers say pigs are a preferred choice because they grow fast and the size of their organs is similar to that of humans.


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization for the surgery on New Year’s Eve through its expanded access (compassionate use) provision. It is used when an experimental medical product, in this case the genetically-modified pig’s heart, is the only option available for a patient faced with a serious or life-threatening medical condition. The authorization to proceed was granted in the hope of saving the patient’s life, according to a UMSOM press release.

“This is the culmination of years of highly complicated research to hone this technique in animals with survival times that have reached beyond nine months. The FDA used our data and data on the experimental pig to authorize the transplant in an end-stage heart disease patient who had no other treatment options,” said Dr. Mohiuddin. “The successful procedure provided valuable information to help the medical community improve this potentially life-saving method in future patients.”

About 30% of the 800,000 doctors, or about 240,000 doctors, practicing in America are of foreign origin, according to Catholic Health Association of the United States. Predictions vary, but according to the American Association of Medical Colleges, by 2025 the U.S. will be short about 160,000 physicians. This gap will most likely be filled by more foreign doctors.



As of 2013, there were over 12,000 Pakistani doctors, or about 5% of all foreign physicians and surgeons, in practice in the United States. Pakistan is the third largest source of foreign-trained doctors. India tops with 22%, or 52,800 doctors. It is followed by the Philippines with 6%, or 14,400 foreign-trained doctors. India and Pakistan also rank as the top two sources of foreign doctors in the United Kingdom.

Over half a million Pakistani-Americans constitute the 7th largest Asian ethnic group in the United States. Pakistani-Americans are young, well-educated and prosperous. Median age for Pakistani-Americans is 31.7 years. 60% have at least a bachelor's degree. Their median household income is $87,510 a year. Last year, the remittances from Pakistani-Americans jumped 58% to $2.75 billion.
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Hakikat ve Hikmet

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As per the Kitaps, some Beni Israeli folks were fishing on the Sabath Day. They were advised to do worship, and they mocked it like Hell!! Then they were turned into pigs by the DIVINE CURSE...

Pigs are I think nearest to the human beings.....
 

RiazHaq

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Excerpts of "Our Man", biography of late Richard Holbrooke, President Obama's Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan (SRAP), by George Packer

Holbrooke died in December 13, 2010 after his aorta ruptured.

His emergency heart surgery was performed by Dr. Farzad Najam, a Pakistani-American heart surgeon at George Washington Hospital in Washington DC.

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Hillary Clinton’s doctor, Jehan El-Bayoumi, worked at George Washington and heard from a Clinton aide that an important person was coming their way. A young cardiologist named Monica Mukherjee met the ambulance at the doors and led the gurney through the emergency room to radiology.

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Mukherjee called the hospital’s chief cardiac surgeon, who was fifteen minutes away. “You need to come right now. It’s a VIP.” “Who is it?” “His name is (Richard) Holbrooke.” He was wheeled into the triage trauma bay and a curtain was drawn around the gurney. Feldman was on his left side, holding his hand, and LaVine was at the foot of the bed. Mukherjee was trying to get a catheter into his right wrist to monitor blood pressure, but he was in such turmoil that she couldn’t do it. His skin was cold and clammy and he looked as if he was about to pass out, but Mukherjee was struck by how he dominated the room—not just his size but his sheer presence, the light in his ice-blue eyes.

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They wheeled him to the elevator and took him up to the second floor. He kept instructing Feldman. “Tell Mort Janklow. No, wait till the operation is over, and don’t release a press statement till it’s over.” In the intensive care unit the surgeon introduced himself. “Mr. Holbrooke, I am Dr. Farzad Najam, the cardiac surgeon here.” “Any Indian-American doctor is okay with me,” Holbrooke said. Still putting on. Najam and Mukherjee exchanged a look. Najam was a Pakistani American, from Lahore. He knew about Holbrooke’s work. “Just tell me it’s going to be okay.” “Mr. Holbrooke, you have an acute aortic dissection—the aorta has ripped. It’s a surgical emergency and we need to take you to the operating room.” Najam would have to cut through the breastbone, put him on a bypass pump, and replace the aorta and perhaps the valve.


Packer, George. Our Man . Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.
 

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