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sparklingway

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May 12, 2009
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actually sparkles there was work going on it till late last year, Im not too sure about what your saying you gotta source or something ?
I'll check but my opinion is based on reading things around a number of blogs. If you can come up with updated news, it would be really helpful though. It might just be underway and make me look like a fool :)
 

Zaki

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لے اے کی بکواس ہے. پانی کسی اور نے چیک کرنا تھا
بکواس نہیں بہت بڑی بکواس ہے۔ انہوں نے شاید زمین کا سروے نہی کروایا تھا۔ ارب لوگوں کا پروجیکٹ ہے۔ دماغ استمال کرنا منع ہے۔
 

TechLahore

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Some people won't like it, but Centaurs, I must say, is the ugliest piece of architecture ever.
That's a bit extreme... lighten up a bit! I understand you are of the Cycle-everywhere-Don't-widen-the-canal-Islamabad-is-for-the-rich-Centaurus-is-exploitative-and-ugly school of thought, but being a little positive about your country once in a while won't hurt you :-)

The Centaurus is far from the "ugliest piece of architecture". It is pumping in hundreds of millions of dollars into Pakistani steel, cement, electrical and allied construction industries. It will create thousands of jobs in Islamabad for ordinary "non-exploitative-elite" citizens.

Based on your posts I do get a sense for which frequent Pakistani journalists/writers you follow, but I have one humble piece of unsolicited advice: Cynicism is poison. If you look at the "output" of these hacks, you won't find anything positive or uplifting. There is constant criticism, constant negativity... this is wrong, that is wrong... God knows, Pakistan doesn't need an army of cynical critics who crib and complain in pretense laden "Oh-I'm-so-vilaiti" newspaper columns all the time. We need people who will roll up their sleeves and build... take things forward. Just as with any human endeavour, the path taken will never be perfect and yes, along the way mistakes will be made, but progress with mistakes is better than sitting on your *** complaining all day and pulling the nation down by writing pompous, cynical & acerbic pieces for newspapers.

I don't expect a response. Just my 2 cents.
 

sparklingway

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That's a bit extreme... lighten up a bit! I understand you are of the Cycle-everywhere-Don't-widen-the-canal-Islamabad-is-for-the-rich-Centaurus-is-exploitative-and-ugly school of thought, but being a little positive about your country once in a while won't hurt you :-)

The Centaurus is far from the "ugliest piece of architecture". It is pumping in hundreds of millions of dollars into Pakistani steel, cement, electrical and allied construction industries. It will create thousands of jobs in Islamabad for ordinary "non-exploitative-elite" citizens.

Based on your posts I do get a sense for which frequent Pakistani journalists/writers you follow, but I have one humble piece of unsolicited advice: Cynicism is poison. If you look at the "output" of these hacks, you won't find anything positive or uplifting. There is constant criticism, constant negativity... this is wrong, that is wrong... God knows, Pakistan doesn't need an army of cynical critics who crib and complain in pretense laden "Oh-I'm-so-vilaiti" newspaper columns all the time. We need people who will roll up their sleeves and build... take things forward. Just as with any human endeavour, the path taken will never be perfect and yes, along the way mistakes will be made, but progress with mistakes is better than sitting on your *** complaining all day and pulling the nation down by writing pompous, cynical & acerbic pieces for newspapers.

I don't expect a response. Just my 2 cents.
Your points are indeed praiseworthy. I was not being pessimistic rather expressing my views on the architecture of the building. The Islamabad WTC would have extracted the same opinion from me, had I been explicitly following the big building is bad theory, but I find the design to be praiseworthy. The opnion in that sentence was limited to the building design and I wasn't expressing my opinion about the need for it or whether it is elusively aimed at the rich (although I have no doubt that it is and not needed).

Your opinion about leaving cynicism and pessimism behind are indeed well founded. Sadly, optimism is something I have been struggling to find in many things in my life :rolleyes:

Off topic but today, I'm especially feeling gloomy and sad because three, four books on Pakistani history and politics I had been struggling to find in Pakistan for over two years, I have been able to get them from my university library here. That really saddened me for a book on Pakistan was unavailable in Pakistan yet is available at four libraries within a 350mi radius of where I'm living :confused:

PS : Publishers had discontinued the book. I had spent countless hours in Urdu Bazaar and other old book shops in vain as well. Libraries were hardly ever helping and while the National Library had copies of two of those books, access has been restricted for a couple of years now due to the almighty "security reasons"
 
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TechLahore

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Your opinion about leaving cynicism and pessimism behind are indeed well founded. Sadly, optimism is something I have been struggling to find in many things in my life :rolleyes:

Off topic but today, I'm especially feeling gloomy and sad because three, four books on Pakistani history and politics I had been struggling to find in Pakistan for over two years, I have been able to get them from my university library here. That really saddened me for a book on Pakistan was unavailable in Pakistan yet is available at four libraries within a 350mi radius of where I'm living :confused:

PS : Publishers had discontinued the book. I had spent countless hours in Urdu Bazaar and other old book shops in vain as well. Libraries were hardly ever helping and while the National Library had copies of two of those books, access has been restricted for a couple of years now due to the almighty "security reasons"
It's inexcusable that as a moderator, I am posting off-topic... so before I begin, shame on me! That said, I think the subject we're talking about it is near and dear to the hearts of many patriotic Pakistanis.

Our search for optimism is often a difficult one. First off, we come from a culture (I would extend this characterization to both South Asia and the Middle East) that is incredibly critical. Negativity and finding fault comes somewhat naturally. Secondly, we've been assaulted in the international press - unfairly, and with malevolent intent - for decades. This tends to rub off and manifests itself in the environment in a myriad different ways. Whether it's poor treatment at an immigration counter on account of our faith and background, or whether it's biased commentary and accusing questions asked of us in real life... specially those of us who spend much of their time abroad. Having someone tell you how dangerous and untrustworthy you are for decades upon decades is less an expression of opinoin, and more akin to psychological warfare. We have been subjected to no less.

And then, of course, there is the state of affairs within the country. We have a government in power that is obviously comprised of many low-life characters, thieves and thugs countered by an opposition that might be somewhat worse, but definitely not better. Where is one to find hope?

I have often grappled with this question. And I think the answer to this, while incredibly long and not given to elucidation in a forum post, essentially revolves around some of what I will try to share below.

To begin with, I think it is hard for a patriotic citizen with an understandably emotional reaction to what goes on in Pakistan to look at the things at a macro level, separating the day-to-day consequences of a failed policy, an unfortunate election or obvious bureaucratic mismanagement, from the broader, higher-level direction things have been progressing in. One could list the positive strides made by the Pakistani nation and they are not at all unimpressive. In fact, to someone on the outside who is not part of day-to-day Pakistani life, it may appear quite promising and fantastic. And frankly, I don't think that would be an incorrect impression or conclusion. If you look at where we stood in 1947 and compare the Pakistan of today - its capabilities, its institutions, the infrastructure it has built, its international and regional influence - there is a massive difference.

Also, the kinds of inconveniences the population experiences in a country at our stage of development can create a lot of individual frustration. This frustration is multiplied a hundred-fold amongst those who make constant mental comparisons with the west. I have always held that small irritants that hamper you on a day to day basis rob you of optimism much quicker than some big cataclysmic occurrence that you are personally isolated from. In Pakistan, much as in many developing countries, problems with electricity, traffic and other day-to-day issues can wear you down. Especially so if you think of Highway 101 every time a khota rehri gets in your way.

And another very critical element that causes pessimism and emotional burnout, especially amongst the most well meaning, nationalistic citizens, is the realization that the kind of change they want to see will not materialize with the wave of a wand. There are many manifestations of this particular form of frustration. Some people try to make a difference but are unable to bring about the quantum of change they would like and hence feel they have failed... that they can't change anything. Others are overwhelmed by the scale of some problems - millions of people need to be provided better housing, for example - and calculate how long that might take. The answers are disappointing. And yet others are sensitive souls who look at the poor condition of the bottom end of society and the massive disparity of wealth and influence that exists and are sickened by it...

One could address each one of these causes of frustration and pessimism above with examples of hopeful developments... situations where someone has figured out a better alternative... where the disparities have been erased, if partially... but that's not the point. The point is that within our lifetimes, Pakistan has to make a lot of progress. And as we make this progress, the view from the inside will often not be pretty. Things we see will sometimes sap our optimism. The turn of events will often feel disastrous. But ultimately, it is not just the roads and buildings and railroads that is Pakistan. Pakistan is US. If we refuse to give in, then there is hope. And if we continue to improve, then Pakistan is improving.

Given the particular period of our nation's evolution that we happen to be living through, we will need to discipline ourselves and understand the difference between recognition and resignation. Recognizing the status quo to be what it is and continuing to apply whatever minute bit of effort we can to change it is what will make the difference. Resigning oneself to constant analysis and regurgitation of why the situation is bad can only contribute to a younger, freer, more optimistic Pakistani's misery.

I have personally found that you truly are the company you keep. The more you let yourself be surrounded by negative views - even when espoused by self-proclaimed intellectuals with a Cambridge education and a pretentious accent - the more you lose yourself. It's like being in the fictional doldrums. On the other hand, if you're lucky enough to find people who draw upon their internal reserve of grit, determination and optimism, you'll rediscover your drive and lend a little bit of that essential rose colouration to the lenses you look at life through. That can be a huge asset.




[Note: When I say "you", I don't mean you personally. Rather, the general "you"... so please don't take this as a rant directed at you or anyone else. Just sharing my experiences]
 

SHAMK9

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guys we are supposed to happy about pakistan not fight each other . i really like centaurus bacause i think it will provide alot of jobs and attract people from other countries
 

alizaman01

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There are many properties for sale in Behria Town Lahore, electricity, security and atmosphere is divine over there. People are more interested in living there as it is a wonderfully planned housing scheme.

ApnaPlot.pk - Behria Town Lahore House for Sale
 

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