• Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Featured Pakistan Navy: The Phoenix Rises

Discussion in 'Pakistan Navy' started by Socra, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. Socra

    Socra ADVISORS

    Messages:
    32,775
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Ratings:
    +323 / 63,841 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Pakistan Navy : The Phoenix Rises

    By: "Oscar" from team Pakistan Defence
    October-09-2016

    tahafuz-sahil.jpg

    Traditionally, the Pakistan Navy has been the stepchild within the branches of the Pakistani military. This has to do with the lack of understanding by the major decision influences within Pakistan’s military procurement programs; in this case, the Pakistan army, which tends to hoard the military budget(willingly or by virtue of size), followed by the Pakistan air force. Ironically, the Pakistan air force officers due to their greater exposure and generally better education in terms of military objectives in training (due to better quality syllabi and a much more selective plethora of candidates that become officers) are much more aware of Pakistan and its military deficiencies, but tend to be selfish when it comes to budgetary requests (as all individual branches within the world military forces are).

    Another reason for the stepchild treatment has to do with the generally expensive nature and high-value of what are the Navy’s primary bread-and-butter in oceangoing vessels both surface and subsurface. A single destroyer can run in cost to hundreds of millions of dollars, whereas the same amount can purchase 10 or 15 fighter jets or 60 tanks.

    Finally, there was the issue of economic and diplomatic sanctions that Pakistan had to face after the Pressler Amendment, which all but cut off the traditional sources for Pakistan’s procurement plans. It would be unfair to single out the Navy at the receiving end of budgetary isolation as one of the most expensive procurement programs undertaken by Pakistan during the 90s involved the Pakistan Navy and the Agosta 90 B submarine. For its time, the platform was an adequately sophisticated diesel electric submarine that could be procured and with the traditional kickbacks and corruption ladled deals that are the hallmark of the Pakistani defense procurement, the program cost more than its share of budget allocation.

    Pre-2001: the years of neglect

    Prior to 2001, Pakistan Navy’s fleet was made up of generally obsolescent vessels such as the type – 21 frigate, nearly mothballed during destroyers, 2 training Leander FFs, along with a mix of Chinese missile boats, minesweepers and various FACs. Its aviation assets will be considered and somewhat better shape with less advanced, but somewhat effective versions of the Breguet Atlantique serving in an anti submarine role. Additionally, there were versions of the Sea King helicopter that usually operated from land with the outdated Alouette picking up a ship based antisubmarine warfare role. While the Pakistan Navy had operated Westland Lynx helicopters which were bought in lieu of the type XXI frigates; lack of spares and general support had them mothballed around this time. There were also 2 P-3C Orion Aircraft that while being relatively good Anti-Submarine aircraft were grounded due to the inability of the PN to complete a overhaul.

    The supposed pride of the Pakistan Navy lay in the submarine arm, which consisted of three Agosta class vessels of which two were the 70 type and one was the modernized 90 type. There were additional 4 Daphne class submarines with these were mostly relegated to training roles and insignificant coastal forays.

    That is not to say that some progress had not been made in terms of keeping up efforts in modernization for its assets. Various training systems based on computer simulations had been set up for its submarine fleet and overall command and control. There were efforts to coordinate the procurement of unmanned aerial vehicles to be operated from its surface assets as alternatives to the more expensive option of using helicopter assets for tasks such as observation, reconnaissance and radio relay. In addition, efforts were underway at the time to look at Chinese offerings for surface, subsurface and aviation assets.

    Post 2001 procurement:

    One of the first priorities for the Pakistan Navy after the lifting of embargoes was to try and get its backlog of spares cleared up for the American equipment it operates. This included the P – 3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft, such the Phlanax close in weapons system mounted on its key surface vessels, and ancillary spares for the harpoon missile system.

    The initial attempts to procure these systems were met with hesitation from the US government, which wanted to ensure that any weapon systems sold to Pakistan would have some usefulness within the support for the war on terror as it was important to convince the US Congress of the same. In light of this, many of the upgrades were financed under US aid based upon the usefulness in providing maritime intelligence against possible terrorist usage of Pakistan’s territorial waters.

    The P-3 C Orion maritime patrol aircraft underwent a series of upgrades which brought them to the same standard as those operated by the United States Navy. This includes capability to coordinate data and threat picture with the entire C4I2 system of the Pakistan Navy (and with recent developments, the Pakistan integrated air defense system). The combination of surface search radar, active and passive sonobouys , along with synthetic aperture radar allows the P-3 C Orion operated by Pakistan Navy to be able to enhance Pakistan’s maritime security and considerably threaten and delay any blockade attempts by the aggressor both surface and subsurface.

    Certain ancillary systems were also purchased for usage on the existing Westland SH3 seaking helicopters with these were generally purchased off-the-shelf. In light of the additional expected responsibility allocated the Pakistan Navy in curtailing terrorist movements, expectations were to purchase patrol craft that would allow the Pakistan Navy to conduct halt and search operations on vessels within the Arabian Sea. For this purpose, a certain amount of the military. It provided had to be spent on fast intercept craft along with a multitude of small arms and equipment for naval commandos.

    The greatest focus for the Pakistan Navy was to increase its surface presence and replace what were essentially floating helpless targets in its oldest ships. To ameliorate the situation, the Pakistan Navy went on a search for various frigate class ships within the 2500 to 4500 ton displacement range. Among the candidates evaluated were the Oliver Hazard Perry class(USA-refurbished and available as EDA), Type 22(UK- Refurbished), MEKO( Germany – New) Class, Type 53H3(China- New) and FREMM(France – New). The French and German designs were overruled due to cost. Since the PN would not be able to afford the eventual complement of 8 it wants. The OHP from the US brought with it the advantage of being a tried and trusted platform that Pakistan could convince the US to provide it under aid and for free using the EDA program; so that all Pakistan would pay for would be refurbishment and delivery costs.

    Around 2005, the Pakistan Navy decided to jump in on the option of the excess defence articles from the US, which included the option of upcoming decommissioned OHP frigates and the P-3 Orion patrol aircraft. The original plan was to acquire 4 OHP frigates, along with six Sikorsky SH-60F anti-submarine warfare helicopters. However, only one OHP was approved and procured without its helicopter complement due to a lack of funds and deteriorating relations.

    The other boost for the surface fleet came from the purchase of modified Jiangwei II frigates, along with a complement of Z-9EC helicopters which are essentially Chinese variants of the Euro copter (now Airbus) AS-565 Panther. This platform comes with a very respectable anti-submarine warfare suite and is able to coordinate data and attacks with the F-22 P frigates. Together they provided a much-needed boost to Pakistan’s ASW& ASuW capabilities as previously the only shipborne element that could work effectively for longer periods in such operations were the lynx helicopters which now sit mothballed.

    Pakistan’s complement of Westland Sea King helicopters generally operates from short bases and was unable to provide a similar level of detached coverage that now extends beyond Pakistan’s territorial sea space. The sea Kings did however undergo an upgrade in the mid-2000 with equipment purchased both from European sources, along with an unnamed country providing electronic support measures.

    To offset its inability to purchase larger and more expensive capital ships, the Pakistan Navy has relied on various fast attack missile craft as an asymmetric offset. This included earlier designs adapted from China, which were retired in the early 2000’s. The replacement is generally a simple design with an aft mounted missile launcher housing C-801 system (it is suggested that the system was only a trial and was replaced with C-802). Two of these craft were built in the late 90s and after trials at sea,2 more improved versions were built at karachi shipyards.

    However, the actual focus of the missile craft program was to create a semi-low-observable design that could sit between a corvette and a smaller patrol boat. The first of these craft is the Azmat Class which has a theoretical top speed of 45 knots but is limited by its weak engine. The craft is however pretty effective in its role of littoral harassment and carries C-802 missiles which are capable of receiving both targeting and guidance from off board sensors.

    A further 8 craft are planned which will likely be either scaled up versions of the Azmat or craft that would qualify as Corvettes. The true achievement has been the development of the net-centric C4I system within the PN that allows aircraft such as the P-3 to coordinate and direct attacks on targets from weapon launch platforms such as the Azmat and the Zulfiqar along with land based SSMs.

    As the Agosta-90B acquisitions were completed, the Pakistan Navy began to consider an additional sub purchase to replace the earlier Agosta 70 class of submarines which would eventually be nearing retirement by 2018. In light of this, the first option was to either go for more Agosta 90B systems or the Scorpene class from the French DCN. This brought with it familiarity with systems along with a known relationship with the supplier. The French were initially positive to this deal until India rolled out its various defence modernization programs which included unsaid clauses on not selling similar equipment to Pakistan as a positive consideration for its own programs.

    Facing both a less than eager French who hiked up the prices for new Submarines; the Pakistan Navy was still keen on procuring a western class and turned to Germany. Negotiations took place on a tailored version of the Type 214 submarine but the efforts of Indian lobbyists within the European Union Parliament all but ended any hopes of procuring this platform.

    Thankfully, the Pakistan Navy had been toying with the idea of using a Chinese Platform prior to 2001, and had been negotiating on a modified Yuan class submarine with further noise suppression to increase its underwater stealth. The contract was to include construction at Karachi Shipyard Engineering Works to allow not just for transfer of technology but also meet delivery timelines.

    The Yuan class of submarines is a carry on from China’s original adaptation known as the Song class and includes ideas taken from China’s Russian origin Kilo class subs. Its sonar is comparable if not better to the TSM 2233 Mk 2 sonar made by the French company Thales. Unconfirmed rumours suggest that the latest Yuan class employs multiple arrays to further increase its coverage and detection accuracy. In addition, the submarine is capable of employing the C-802 missile from its torpedo tubes.

    Worth mentioning is the Pakistani Navy's research into the usage of UAV's and UUVs and the subsequent acquisition of the former from both western and local sources. The variety of platforms used is based upon an ongoing attempt to continually evaluate systems and implement them within the greater role of providing more sensors for surveillance operations along with taking the burden of more expensive to operate manned systems.


    Where these systems fit are into creating a very expansive and capable C4I network.

    More with Less: Pakistan Navy’s Net-centric C4I grid:

    To complete its coastal defense grid and try to stave off a repeat of the blockade scenario Pakistan faced in 71, the PN has developed a plethora of sensor and weapons systems along the coast line which feed into its primary net. This includes shore based radars, ship board sensors, P-3C and Sea King surveillance radars along with taking a feed from the PAF’s ZDK-03 system. Developing a composite picture of both air, sea and submarine targets that feeds into its regional combat HQ and to NHQ in Islamabad. Quite simply, the system has changed how the PN fights its battles and allows it to coordinate attacks against any threat using the various weapons it has at its disposal. In addition, its sensors plug into the PAF’s own Air Defence grid allowing PN ships to act as SAM batteries under the Air Force’s command.

    To assist with the off board weapons employment and shore defence, the Pakistan Navy recently completed its deployment and integration of a shore based anti-ship missile defense grid dubbed as Barq. Barq is assumed to employ a locally modified version of the C-602 to bypass the MTCR (missile technology control regime, restricts exports of missiles with ranges greater than 300km) restrictions as it has done with various Chinese weapons.

    To demonstrate, current Pakistan surveillance of its southern coast by air paints a picture similar to the following:

    1w.PNG

    The various concentric circles indicate air surveillance sensors that include ground based radars, AEW systems such as the ZDK-03 Karokaram eagle shown, and ship-borne systems along with fighter radars. As a disclaimer, this is not an exact measurement as ranges and effectiveness of sensors is taken with a conservative outlook.

    The same sensor net also provides Sea target surveillance, as the yellow circles and semi-circles show which includes the F-22P sensors, Z-9, P-3, ZDK-03, Coastal Radar and fighter radar. The large yellow circle represents a conservative estimate of the range that the ZDK-03 allows for surveillance of naval assets, and the bold semi-circle represents the range of the P-3 Orion sensors. Just as with the air defense net, all these sensors link to provide a single picture of Pakistan’s coastal and sea territory safety.

    2w.PNG

    Lastly, the red circles indicate the effectiveness of weapons available to the PN from sea and shore based systems (not actual positions or ranges but estimates). This does not include the usage of AGM-84 Harpoon systems on the P-3.

    3w.PNG

    This combined defense system offers a good mix of ship, shore and air based defenses of Pakistan’s coast and the various layers help back up each other in case of a concentrated enemy attack. Without a doubt, this is most important development in the naval defense of Pakistan and is generally not taken for what it is actually worth; as it has allowed the PN to transform from a fairly weak arm into a well coordinate and effective fighting force.

    Nuclear Ambitions & the Second Strike capability:

    As Pakistan’s nuclear program rolled along during the late 1980’s, ideas were considered on how Pakistan would ensure the safety of its strike capability against a concentrated attack and still be able to hit back in case of a surprise attack. Options included creating hardened silos, mobile weapons and dispersal sites for dedicated aircraft.

    Silos were not considered as effective since they were fixed targets that could eventually fall to multiple hits and required great expense. Since Pakistan’s primary land based warheads were already focused to be based on Mobile platforms that continuously roam the country, there was a requirement to create a sea based deterrent force.

    However, since Pakistan did not have a sufficiently large submarine to carry a Ballistic missile; and at the time did not possess a cruise weapons system; it was decided to try and use the helicopter decks of its Capital ships as launching platforms. Several attempts towards this were carried out during the late 90’s all the way to the nuclear tests; but the complexity of the system along with reliability issues led to this option never being exercised.

    One option considered was to reverse engineer and/or modify the French SM-39 exocet missiles to carry a warhead; however, the small size of the missile required a miniaturized warhead which Pakistan would take ten years to develop; along with the limited range ended the idea before any fruitful research was even carried out.

    Pakistan’s luck changed thanks to a US strike on terrorists in Afghanistan during the mid-90’ and several intact US BGM-109B tomahawk missiles landed on Pakistani territory which it promptly carted off to its research facilities along with providing an example to China to reverse engineer. With a locally designed guidance and flight system using a Chinese provided engine, the Babur missile

    Since it was decided by the early 2000’s that Babur could serve as a viable nuclear delivery system, various ideas were gamed on how to use the system from its pre-existing submarines. However, it was decided that a new class of Submarine was needed to deploy the system.

    Information on this system gets fairly sketchy and speculative. The purchase of 8 new submarines from China prompted speculation on the usage of the Qing class due to its Sail Size which could accommodate both the Babur and a Submarine launched Ballistic missile. However, the confirmation that the new submarine was the S-20 ended all these speculation.

    What is known by sources close to the PN is that Pakistan’s nuclear delivery ambitions go beyond the 8 subs purchased and include the design and development of two different platforms. This includes a platform capable of launching ballistic missiles. Both these platforms are confirmed to be nuclear powered as per the interviews of Pakistani officials.

    These programs are currently well in progress and a correlation of known knowledge and sources suggest that one platform is to serve as a launch platform for both a derivative of the Babur and a Submarine Ballistic Missile. The other platform is an attack submarine designed to escort this platform but primarily hunt an adversary’s second strike ballistic submarine.

    If these reports are accurate, the Pakistan Navy will not only be able to provide a second strike capability which could launch weapons against targets from the Bay of Bengal, it could also potentially deploy a submarine for long term duration hunts that last more than half a year along with keeping an eye on adversary movement.

    From its days in the 90’s as a step-child branch of the Pakistani military, the current modernization plans along with the pace of force integration with other branches, the Pakistan Navy is slowly bur surely turning into a force to be truly reckoned with.

    @Horus @The Deterrent @Manticore @Irfan Baloch @Penguin @niaz @araz @Tempest II @Slav Defence @PARIKRAMA @MilSpec @Bilal Khan (Quwa) @Bilal Khan 777 @Dazzler @Side-Winder
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 9, 2016
    • Thanks Thanks x 97
    • Positive Rating Positive Rating x 16
  2. Bilal Khan (Quwa)

    Bilal Khan (Quwa) SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    4,122
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2016
    Ratings:
    +31 / 12,863 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Canada
    Spot on.

    The Pakistan Navy is being tuned for anti-access and area-denial (A2/AD) duties so as to safeguard Pakistan's coastlines and defend our valuable economic assets in the vicinity (e.g. port cities, shipyards, etc). It isn't ideal considering that the Navy wanted to expand to a more traditional role - i.e. patrolling and guarding the sea-lines-of-communication (SLOC) in war time.

    However, the requisite surface combatants to achieve that in proper terms (especially in light of the enhanced anti-air warfare or AAW profile) would not come cheap by any measure. Furthermore, Pakistan only has eight or nine ships within its own merchant navy, so it is not as if there is a pressing need to guard our SLOC in times of war, not unless the Gulf Arab states want to send their own trading ships past a certain Indian blockade. In effect, the SLOC aspect is a non-factor in war, and strategically speaking, Pakistan could offset the impacts of an Indian naval blockade by further tuning its economy to focus on the Central Asian and Russian markets.

    The eight Chinese submarines - which are probably AIP-equipped S20s - are absolutely nothing to scoff at. For one thing, we should be aware that the Chinese have been working on several distinct programs, including fuel-cell AIP technology at Dalian. With Pakistan being among the launch clients of China's modern submarine designs, I imagine a concession was made to enable Pakistan to access China's AIP technology. Alternatively, Western AIP may also be a possibility, though unlikely (not impossible considering our F-22P use German propulsion).

    In any case, few navies in the world - much less the Arabian Sea - can field 11 AIP submarines. Combined with the FAC force (Azmat and MRTP-33) as well as the coastal AShM network, the Navy should be able to guard the coastline fairly well. The JF-17 squadron (hopefully *squadrons* in the near future) posted along the coast offer close proximity air coverage for those assets as well.

    Long-term, I do wonder if we will see a more traditional naval development track. Granted, Pakistan's tiny merchant navy does not really warrant it at this time, but with CPEC, this may change in the coming decades. Moreover, if Pakistani foreign policymakers one day succeed in securing markets in Africa, and that too with Pakistani trading ships playing a key role, then a SLOC-centric Navy will become a necessity. But this is abstract thought.

    Near-term, the SLOC element will probably focus on the procurement of corvettes or light frigates (i.e. 2,000 to 3,000-ton) - such as the Turkish MILGEM - as a means to develop an efficient surface combatant arm to (1) engage in peace time SLOC policing and security duties and (2) double down the A2/AD element in war-time. The advances in AAW technology (via compact active-guided SAM) would enable even small surface ships to have credible medium-range AAW coverage, which could be helpful for Pakistan's submarine fleet against enemy MPA assets. All eyes are on the proposed STM corvette program with Turkey.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2016
    • Thanks Thanks x 33
  3. Zarvan

    Zarvan ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    48,336
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Ratings:
    +86 / 50,854 / -13
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Pakistan Navy needs to now think of becoming offensive one. We need to go for a global role. We need Frigates which have VLS system for long range cruise missiles. We need Sub's for this role also. Navy also needs to have its separate avaiation which is equipped with jets like J-16. Lastly we also need to massively increase number of marines and equip them with weapons and turn them into strike force not a defensive one. Yes budget is big issue but we need to start the process
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 4
  4. war&peace

    war&peace ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    33,805
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2015
    Ratings:
    +27 / 59,203 / -9
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Sweden
    With CPEC becoming operational Pakistan will have the cash and influence to get best systems for its navy and it will be pivotal for Pakistan to strengthen its maritime forces beyond usual roles to safeguard its economic interests and that is where defence acquisitions and budget make the most sense...you have an economy to defend and the best defence is the offence.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 12
  5. Zarvan

    Zarvan ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    48,336
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Ratings:
    +86 / 50,854 / -13
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    I agree CPEC is great opportunity for us to expand our Navy. We need to get Frigates from Turkey and also South Korea with VLS like MK 41 system which can do multi functions I mean from firing Air Defence Missiles to Long Range cruise missiles. They would not only give us more platforms for nuclear but also massive conventional power. In future if needed we can also participate missiles around the globe
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 4
  6. war&peace

    war&peace ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    33,805
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2015
    Ratings:
    +27 / 59,203 / -9
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Sweden
    I would recommend that we adopt a hybrid approach i.e. direct acquisition from the market to address our immediate needs but mainly concentrate on indigenous developments with total in-house development, JV and ToT based acquisitions for near and distant future. But the most ideal situation will be when we are able to design our own systems from the scratch totally indigenously to suit our needs.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 6
  7. GreenFalcon

    GreenFalcon SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    2,434
    Joined:
    May 11, 2014
    Ratings:
    +7 / 5,110 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Great thread... can you also please shed some light on PN's Unmanned aerial systems; like which ones are we using and how important they are. Thanks
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 3
  8. AZADPAKISTAN2009

    AZADPAKISTAN2009 ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    31,210
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2009
    Ratings:
    +64 / 31,554 / -2
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    China
    Nicely written document congrats on the wonderful articulate write up.

    We do have potential avenues to grow surface fleet

    • F22P from China
    • Corvettes from Turkey
    • Corvettes from Indonesia
    Sooner or later we will have to fill gap , lets see which ships will become a reality considering the need for these items
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2016
    • Thanks Thanks x 3
  9. T-123456

    T-123456 ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    11,367
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2012
    Ratings:
    +11 / 17,487 / -0
    Country:
    Turkey
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Well,i hope this is true.
    @Bilal Khan (Quwa) ?
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 3
  10. Zarvan

    Zarvan ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    48,336
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Ratings:
    +86 / 50,854 / -13
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    We need Frigates like these
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  11. AUz

    AUz ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    8,203
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Ratings:
    +29 / 13,270 / -44
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    United States
    So Pakistan is building/searching for nuclear powered submarines capable of launching ballistic missiles? What?

    I think this article is bit of a stretch and "Pakistani officials" giving interviews are just deflecting the sorry state of our naval power.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  12. Hell hound

    Hell hound STAFF

    Messages:
    4,169
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Ratings:
    +2 / 7,286 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    all of your points are great and i see you are using Command Modern Air/Naval Operations for simulation here.then you surely know the importance of AAW role warships for defence of our fleet.as a magzine of eight hq 7 sam missles is not enough to thwart any saturation attack of bhramos.our f 22 and 21s will be sitting ducks for indian navy or in some senarios even their naval air arm can be enough to wipe most of our surface fleet out(p 8 and mig 29).as it simply impossible to provide our ships with 24 hour air cover in war time.
    pls shed some light on this matter too in your article so all other readers can know what we have achieved in last 15 years and what still remains to be achieved.
    @Oscar
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  13. Socra

    Socra ADVISORS

    Messages:
    32,775
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Ratings:
    +323 / 63,841 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Nobody is forcing it down your throat. However, this was written after either verifiable facts or tidbits from both publications and solid sources.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 15
  14. war&peace

    war&peace ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    33,805
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2015
    Ratings:
    +27 / 59,203 / -9
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Sweden
    Nobody is asking you to come out of your depression. He is a senior poster and known for the quality of his posts
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 6
  15. mansoor raja

    mansoor raja FULL MEMBER

    Messages:
    150
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2016
    Ratings:
    +0 / 118 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Zimbabwe
    We need atleast 8 destroyers, 12 frigates, 8 Subs 1 helicopter carriers, one Aircraft carrier even the small one will do. And massive Airpower, S400-300 just to prevent blockade by our enemies. Enemy has grown more capable three different fleet. Western fleet should be our focus.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 4
Similar Threads
  1. SMC
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    6,195
  2. WAQAS119
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    927
  3. MrHaz01
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,809
  4. Hassan Guy
    Replies:
    26
    Views:
    2,340
Loading...