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Pakistan, currently the largest kinnow grower

Discussion in 'Pakistan Economy' started by ameer219, Dec 12, 2010.

  1. ameer219

    ameer219 FULL MEMBER

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    Pakistan, the largest kinnow grower


    By Ismat Sabir

    The scientists of National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) have developed a new seedless variety of kinnow, which is known as kinnow mandarin orange in the world. The production of seedless kinnow on commercial scale in orchards of Sahiwal would probably be started by this year and hopefully show bright prospects of export.


    Chaudhry Niaz, a team member of NARC, who discovered the seedless kinnow said, “The new plant can bear fruit in two years, while full production would start in three to four years that will reduce the high number of seeds.” According to international standards a fruit having one to five seeds is categorised as ‘seedless fruit’ while a normal kinnow has about 18 to 30 seeds, which people from western countries don’t like as much.

    Pakistan is among the top 10 citrus growing countries in the world. The country has vast potential to produce tropical, subtropical and temperate fruits, flowers and vegetables, which are waiting to be exploited. There is a need to focus on horticulture and processing industries for value addition.

    Kinnow is known as a special variety of citrus fruit and due to unique climatic conditions it is grown in Pakistan. It has tremendous potential of export to many countries. The twofold increase in exports of kinnow had already taken place by exploring new markets like Russia, Iran and China.


    About 200,000 metric tonnes kinnow were exported during 2005-06, showing more than a 100 percent increment over the previous year’s exports and a 25 percent of increase over the record ever highest export of 149,000 metric tonnes of kinnow. In 2008-09 the export was 177 million kilogrammes (kg) that climbed to 361 million kgs in 2009-10 earned $45.5 million and $97.8 million, respectively.

    According to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) requirements of exports, it calls for strict compliance with international quality and health safety standards. Besides, best agricultural practices and dedicated production for specific markets both in terms of timely availability in particular tastes, size and colour. Therefore, the producers and processors need to upgrade their capacities and facilities to produce fruits of international standard.

    The Agribusiness Development Project was launched with the assistance of Asian Development Bank aimed to provide business development, support services and facilitate the evolution of enabling environment for agribusiness investment.

    The tax relief and other support measures announced by the government over the past years in support of the horticulture crop production and agro industry development would also help to improve the competitiveness of the product and would fetch better prices.

    The government has declared horticulture as a priority sector and making efforts to improve the value chain and identifying new markets. The quality of product and the shelf life is being improved so that it could be introduced in the high-end markets.

    Exports: Kinnow has already been introduced in more than 25 countries of the world. Its exports can further be increased by manifold if modern marketing techniques are applied. The fruit is among the main exportable horticulture commodities from Pakistan. Annual production of citrus on an average is estimated about 2 million ton, of which 90 percent are kinnow, and export also reached to 360,625 tonnes.

    The world export market for horticulture products is about $80 billion, in which Pakistan’s share was just $140 million in 2004-05. The fruits exports were $194.75 million in 2008-09.

    Pakistan exports to Gulf States, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan and CIS that are been supposed as traditional markets. East Europe, Iran and China are emerging markets. The export to Russian Federation reached 31,000 tonnes, Ukraine 5,000 tonnes and Iran 22,000 tonnes.

    History: Most citrus species originated in Asia, around the Khasia Hills of Assam and southern parts of China, from where this fruit was taken to other parts of the world.

    In the 15th century, citrus trees were raised only in private gardens of Moghul emperors and other rich people, as this was considered to be a luxury and commercial exploitation was limited at that time.

    The records show that an orange variety popularly known as ‘sangtareh’ had found in the region of Lahore, Pakistan. Moghul Emperor Humayun praised this fruit in the following words. “Indeed there is no tasty fruit than the ‘sangtareh’, a local name for sweet orange. Further, sangtara has been mentioned in the famous book ‘Ain-e-Akbari’ by Moghul Emperor Akbar the great; after this the fruit was popularly called as ‘shahi sangtara’ or King Orange.


    Kinnow was evolved as a result of cross between ‘king’ and ‘willow-leaf’. The cross was made by H B Frost, a citrus breeder at the Citrus Research Centre, University of California, USA, in 1951. Both of the parents have Indo-China origins. The name was derived by combining the first and last words of the two parents ie ‘kin’ from king and ‘ow’ from willow joined by ‘n’ in the centre to form ‘kinnow’.

    The fruit was commercially exploited since 1958, and is now grown in Pakistan. It is been identified in all over the world for its special flavour and taste, which is the result of a series of grafting and hybridization research work conducted in Pakistan over the years.

    Kinnow when ripe is deep cadmium yellow. The surface is smooth and glossy. Its shape is oblong round. The size is medium to large, from 64mm to 84mm in diameter. The rind is easy to peel. The fruit is very juicy, fleshy and can be divided very easily into individual segments.

    Harvest season: Kinnow can be harvest from mid November and continues up to May. However, January to March is the peak harvest season.

    Storage life: The storage life of Kinnow varies form 60 days, late harvest, to 90 days, early harvest, if placed inside cold storage at 5 degree Celsius with plus minus variation of 2 degree Celsius, and relative humidity 85 to 90 percent.

    Packaging standard: The general packaging standards is 6, 8, 10 and 13 kg in corrugated boxes. The number can be varied from 32 pieces to 72 pieces per box. Both packaging size and number of counts per package may be according to the importer’s demand.

    Under the WTO regime quality of the products will be of paramount importance for penetrating into the international markets. Pakistan Horticulture Development and Export Board (PHDEB) under its mandate is responsible for designing and implementing quality standards in terms of variety, size, colour, appearance and taste of the produce and to define specifications for packaging and labeling. It also pursue private sector to invest in grading and processing plants and uniform export quality produce to build importers confidence.

    PHDEB carries out its marketing activities not just only to increase exports in the existing markets but also to introduce the products in non traditional markets. The Board have been working to create an Umbrella Brand for marketing citrus and mango initially under that brand. More fruits and vegetables will be added later such as melons, dates, potatoes and onions.

    The provision of effective infrastructure such as dry ports, export zones, transportation hubs, etc. is essential for the export growth. Cold storage facilities are also basic need for cost effective marketing of perishable products as they reduce post harvest losses and minimized health risks. Cold storage facilities increase the shelf life of the product to make products available for longer time at selling stores.

    Research and development: PHDEB has collaborated with various research institutions to assist companies in providing technical and marketing support in line with the latest techniques, developments and changes occurring in the international trade.

    Information dissemination is one of the key goals of PHDEB. It is aimed to provide all types of information including practical information on international trade, marketing, rules and regulations, standards, results of research studies, management techniques, latest technologies, etc.

    The Board is trying to develop not only technical skills but also administrative and managerial skills of horticulture sector entrepreneurs, growers, processors and exporters, so that the industry may be able to meet the challenges of globalization and the requirements of WTO.

    PHDEB also aims to develop institutional capacity by supporting both government and private institutions like chambers and associations through donor supported projects and programmes so that there could be an effective implementation of the overall development plans. Formation of farmer cooperatives, groups is another integral part of PHDEB’s mandate to attain important outputs such as creating volumes for exports to increase the bargaining power of the farmers to secure better returns, to create an effective voice for policy interventions and to create an effective means for development initiatives and interventions.

    It acts as a facilitator of networking, which involves networking among enterprises, supports institutions and policy makers, creating marketing linkages between entrepreneurs and large industries and networking with other markets at the national and international markets. PHDEB said it will keep a close liaison with trade promotion organizations, associations and donors both at the local and international levels to play its role efficiently and effectively.

    Daily Times - Leading News Resource of Pakistan
     
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  2. Zaki

    Zaki MODERATOR

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    pata nahi kyoun I can't eat Kinnow's :cry:

    But my family loves it :D - Good to know that we are currently the largest kinnow grower
     
  3. Zaki

    Zaki MODERATOR

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    ahh I don't like this part from wikipedia page



    Source: Kinnow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  4. A1Kaid

    A1Kaid PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

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    This is nothing to take pride in, it actually in Pakistan's case reflects the lack of industrial and technological output and production.
     
  5. Evil Flare

    Evil Flare SENIOR MEMBER

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    Kinnow is Great .... when its season coming ? :D
     
  6. Enigma

    Enigma FULL MEMBER

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    There was a thread "Guinness records held by Pakistan" may be u can add this one to that :coffee: