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Pakistan Cricket Legends

ghazi52

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Nazar Mohammad faced the first ball and scored the first hundred for Pakistan in Tests.

Great player and father of Mudassar Nazar.....
 

Nilgiri

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Two Great Cricketers of Lahore - Lala Amarnath & Fazal Mahmood


@Joe Shearer have you found any good read about Lala Amarnath's early life story?

https://www.thenews.com.pk/tns/deta...wo-families-of-pakistan-test-cricket-part-iii

Interestingly, both Azmat and another brother Sultan have been assigned the same birth dates of 3rd November 1951 on all the cricket websites even though they are not twins.

A fascinating fact about the Rana family relates to an incident from the 1920s when a leading member of the family, Tawwakal Majid, saw a young boy with exceptional ability playing in the streets of Lahore. The boy came from a very poor Hindu family so Tawwakal went to the boy’s parents and offered to ‘adopt’ him and develop his cricketing career. The parents agreed and the boy was taken into the Rana household where he grew up to be an outstanding cricketer. This Hindu boy who grew up in a Muslim family was the legendary Lala Amarnath, the famous Indian all rounder.


@PanzerKiel @jaibi you chaps into cricket out of interest?

@saiyan0321 @niaz @Jungibaaz you might find interesting...
 

jaibi

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More of a boxer but who's safe from crickets in South Asia?
@Joe Shearer have you found any good read about Lala Amarnath's early life story?

https://www.thenews.com.pk/tns/deta...wo-families-of-pakistan-test-cricket-part-iii

Interestingly, both Azmat and another brother Sultan have been assigned the same birth dates of 3rd November 1951 on all the cricket websites even though they are not twins.

A fascinating fact about the Rana family relates to an incident from the 1920s when a leading member of the family, Tawwakal Majid, saw a young boy with exceptional ability playing in the streets of Lahore. The boy came from a very poor Hindu family so Tawwakal went to the boy’s parents and offered to ‘adopt’ him and develop his cricketing career. The parents agreed and the boy was taken into the Rana household where he grew up to be an outstanding cricketer. This Hindu boy who grew up in a Muslim family was the legendary Lala Amarnath, the famous Indian all rounder.


@PanzerKiel @jaibi you chaps into cricket out of interest?

@saiyan0321 @niaz @Jungibaaz you might find interesting...
 

ghazi52

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Mar 21, 2007
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Death anniversary of Munir Hussain, Legendary Cricket Commentator

Munir Hussain's life is an inspiration to people everywhere who dream big dreams and aspire to create an impact. Born in Amritsar in November 1929, he moved to Delhi while still very young and grew up in the Karol Bagh neighbourhood. In 1947 he migrated to Pakistan, taking a train from Amritsar, the details of which harrowing journey are part of his family lore.

Movies and cricket quickly emerged as his favourite pastimes, but it was journalism that became his singular passion. This found expression through magazine publishing, column writing and, later, broadcasting.

His earliest success was a magazine titled Filmasia, devoted to the film industry in both India and Pakistan. During his Karol Bagh days, he had become friends with Mir Khalilur Rahman, who became a leading media baron and went on to found the Urdu newspaper Jang, Pakistan's largest-circulation daily in any language. In it, Hussain wrote an influential weekly cricket column that ran for four decades and commanded a huge readership.

A diehard lover of the game, Hussain could not get enough of cricket and immersed himself in playing as well as administering it. As an administrator, he served the Karachi City Cricket Association over many years in various capacities, formal and otherwise, including two terms as president, and was regarded for most of his life as one of a handful of key figures in Karachi's cricket affairs.

As a player, Hussain was a club cricket regular and took pride in his ability get the ball to seam at pace. In 1969 he even appeared in a first-class game, representing Quetta (at the time called Kalat Division) and taking 2 for 64. According to a widely passed anecdote, during the rest day of a Test match sometime in the mid-1980s, Hussain once bowled to Imran Khan in the nets and was complimented by the great allrounder on his nip and direction.

Hussain's landmark contribution undoubtedly was the initiation of cricket commentary in Urdu. Even until the late 1960s, commentary on Radio Pakistan and Pakistan television was exclusively in English, unintelligible to the vast majority of the country's cricket followers. When Hussain first proposed the idea of Urdu commentary, traditionalists were aghast. There was a strong feeling that English was the rightful medium for properly conveying the nuances of the game.

Yet Hussain remained undeterred. He had no patience for pedants and felt certain he was on to something. In 1969, he convinced the organisers of a local tournament, the Jang Gold Cup - whose matches were to be broadcast on radio and television - to give him a chance. He proved an instant hit, and a new art form was born.

The Urdu magazine Akhbar-e-Watan, the other major source of Hussain's cricketing fame, appeared in its cricket identity in late 1976. He had been producing it as a social-interest-and-current-affairs magazine for a while before his distribution agent suggested the idea of giving it a cricket flavour. New Zealand were touring Pakistan at the time, and Hussain published a cricket supplement on the occasion under the Akhbar-e-Watan masthead. In keeping with his Midas touch, this proved an instant hit as well. Bubbling with clever opinion, sharp interviews, catchy images, and comprehensive reportage, it acquired iconic status among players and fans alike.

Hussain is fondly remembered as a backer of unpopular causes, a supporter of the disenfranchised, and a nurturing humanist. He has left a remarkable legacy that lives on through his multiple endeavours. His son Iqbal Munir, an accomplished photojournalist who has attained his own rank and status as a cricket media figure, says his father was always keen to pass on his passion for advancement and innovation in the game, mentoring a new generation of commentators and journalists.

Hussain's enthusiasm for the game never dimmed until, literally, his dying day. He devoted his life to cricket, breaking some of its barriers and always celebrating its magic and beauty. The game is richer for it.

(Saad Shafqat)
 

ghazi52

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Mar 21, 2007
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Death Anniversary of Little Master
The Legend Hanif Muhammad

Born on Dec 21, 1934 in Junagarh, Hanif played 55 Test matches for Pakistan between 1952-53 and 1969-70 and averaged a fine 43.98 comprising twelve hundreds.

At his peak, Hanif was considered one of the best batsmen in the world.

Hanif’s marathon knock of 337 that he scored against the West Indies in a Test at Bridgetown in 1957-58, is regarded as one of the epic knocks in the entire cricket history. After Pakistan found themselves following on from a first-innings deficit of 473 runs on the afternoon of the third day, Hanif spent more than sixteen hours at the crease compiling his runs, allowing Pakistan to draw the game.

It remains the longest innings in Test history (and stood as the longest in all first-class cricket for over 40 years).

It was the only Test match instance of a triple century in a team’s second innings until it was equalled by New Zealand’s Brendon McCullum against India in 2014.

In 1958-59, Hanif surpassed Sir Don Bradman’s record for the highest individual first-class innings. Hanif made 499 before being run out attempting his five hundredth run. This mark stood for more than 35 years before being surpassed by Brian Lara in 1994.

In all Hanif made 55 first-class centuries and finished with a strong career average of 52.32.

Hanif was named as a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1968. In January 2009, Hanif was named along with two other Pakistani players — Imran Khan and Javed Miandad — among the inaugural batch of 55 inductees into the ICC’s Hall of Fame. (RIP)

 

ghazi52

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Mar 21, 2007
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Sadiq Mohammad (left) and Mudassar Nazar walking out to bat during the 1st Test match between England and Pakistan at Edgbaston in Birmingham, 1st June 1978. England won by an innings and 57 runs.
Photo by Gerry Armes

 

ghazi52

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Cricketers dressing room in 70's

L to R : Sadiq Muhammad, Javed Miandad, Waseem Raja, Muddi, Abdul Qadir, Zaheer Abbas, Haroon Rasheed and Imran Khan. Courtesy : Ahmed Mansoor Khan

 

ghazi52

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Wasim Raja


Pakistan’s most talented all-rounder

A suave left-handed batsman with an eye-catching moustache, Wasim Raja, was one of the finest from the stables of Pakistan. He was an agile fieldsman and a handy leg-spinner to boot. Born in Multan, Wasim was the eldest of three cricketing sons. Rameez Raja represented Pakistan at the top level whilst Zaeem Raja played first-class cricket for Multan and Lahore.
Wasim tallied 3,600 runs and 72 wickets in 111 five- and one-day internationals between 1973 and 1985, his Test appearances yielding 2,821 runs at 36.16, with four centuries. While his batting carried the stamp of elegance, his bowling was under-rated. Raja also had a nifty googly up his sleeve, which hoodwinked the best in the business like Glenn Turner, Viv Richards and Clive Llyod. He progressed to the big stage after stacking up massive runs in age-group cricket.
However, as good a talent Wasim Raja was, he was unpredictable and brash.
Quite interestingly, Raja reserved his best for the West Indies. His average in 11 Tests against the then Caribbean bowling attack comprising, Malcom Marsh, Colin Croft and Andy Roberts was a whopping 57.43.
Post retirement, he enrolled himself into Durham University for a teaching degree. He later coached the Pakistan Under-19 team and served as an ICC match referee.
In a cruel quirk of fate, he died of a heart attack when he was playing for Surrey-Over 50's at Marlow in August 23, 2006.
"Australian writer Gideon Haigh perfectly describes him as Wasim Hasan Raja truly was a Raja.”




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ghazi52

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Another distinction for Zed (Zaheer Abbas)

The latest member of an exclusive club of extraordinary cricketers "ICC Cricket Hall of Fame"



Image may contain: 1 person, playing a sport and outdoor

 

denel

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I remember when Pak came to RSA after World cup win. Waqar and Akram reverse swing juju balls man took us apart totally at the last 2 overs.
 

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