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Pakistan Army Aviation Corps - Updated

Fawadqasim1

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Pakistan Army Aviation Corps - Updated

GENERAL | ORDER OF BATTLE | INVENTORY | BASES


Order of Battle Notes

6 Army Aviation Sqn was disbanded in 2002 but it is believed the squadron was reformed to operate newly-delivered Bell 412EP helicopters during 2005.

HQ Rawalpindi
HQ Pakistan Armed Forces

HQ Pakistan Army

Qasim AAB, Rawalpindi
HQ Pakistan Army Aviation Corps

Lahore AAB
2 (Composite) Army Aviation Squadron

MFI-17 Mushshak

SA.316B Alouette III

Multan AAB
3 Army Aviation Squadron

MFI-17 Mushshak

SA.315B Lama

Islamabad AAB
6 Army Aviation Squadron

AW139

Bell 412EP

Sharea Faisal AAB, Karachi
7 Army Aviation Squadron

IAR-316B Alouette III

MFI-17 Mushshak

SA.316B Alouette III

8 (Composite) Army Aviation Squadron

AS.350B3 Écureuil

MFI-17 Mushshak

Peshawar AAB
9 (Composite) Army Aviation Squadron

MFI-17 Mushshak

SA.315B Lama

SA.316B Alouette III

Inter-Service Intelligence Department

Mi-17-1V 'Hip-H'

Rahwali AAB
303rd Aviation Group

MFI-17 Mushshak

TH-300C

UH-1H Iroquois

101st Aviation Group

13 Army Aviation Squadron

Aero Commander 690C Super

AS.350B3 Écureuil

Beech 200 Super King Air

Cessna 421C Golden Eagle

Cessna 550 Citation II Bravo

Cessna 560 Citation V

Gulfstream Jetprop 840

IAR-330L Puma

MFI-17 Mushshak

Mi-172 'Hip-H'

SA.330J Puma

UH-1H Iroquois

Y-12 II Turbo Panda

21 Army Aviation Squadron

Mi-17-1V 'Hip-H'

Mi-17-V5 'Hip'

27 Army Aviation Squadron

Mi-17-1V 'Hip-H'

Mi-17-V5 'Hip'

HQ Flight

MFI-17 Mushshak

Quetta Airfield
202nd Aviation Group

MFI-17 Mushshak

4 Army Aviation Squadron

Bell 412EP

Mi-17-1V 'Hip-H'

Gilgit AAB
Detachment

Mi-17-1V 'Hip-H'

Rahwali AAB
Detachment

Mi-17-1V 'Hip-H'

Qasim AAB, Rawalpindi
24 Army Aviation Squadron

IAR-330L Puma

SA.330J Puma

UH-1H Iroquois

Multan AAB
25 Army Aviation Squadron

Bell 412EP

Mi-17-1V 'Hip-H'

Gilgit AAB
Detachment

HQ Flight

Multan AAB
404th Aviation Group

MFI-17 Mushshak

31 Army Aviation Squadron

AH-1S Cobra

Bell 206B-2 JetRanger

Bell 206B-3 JetRanger

33 Army Aviation Squadron

AH-1S Cobra

Bell 206B-2 JetRanger

Bell 206B-3 JetRanger

35 Army Aviation Squadron

AH-1F Cobra

Bell 206B-2 JetRanger

Bell 206B-3 JetRanger

10 Army Aviation Squadron

MFI-17 Mushshak

SA.315B Lama

SA.316B Alouette III

Rahwali AAB
11 Army Aviation Squadron

MFI-17 Mushshak

SA.315B Lama

Mangla AAB
1 Army Aviation Squadron

MFI-17 Mushshak

SA.316B Alouette III

12 Army Aviation Squadron

MFI-17 Mushshak

UH-1H Iroquois

Skardu AAB
5 Army Aviation Squadron

AS.350B3 Écureuil

Mi-17-1V 'Hip-H'
Guess who's name is qasim base named after
 

PanzerKiel

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Guess who's name is qasim base named after
It was early morning of 4 th January 1972 when Major Muhammad Qasim took off from Gujranwala Strip (a flight of 2 Army Aviation Squadron had been moved to Gujranwala to support the operations of field formations). It was late in the afternoon when flight headquarters at Gujranwala received a telephone call from GSO-2. The caller wanted to talk to Major Qasim and apologized for not sending the vehicle at Satrah Strip where Major Qasim was to land. He was surprised when informed that Major Qasim had not returned, as according to him Major Qasim had left an hour ago.

It was then that the search for the missing aircraft started. All the inquiries revealed that Major Qasim took off from Satrah for Gujranwala at 1200 hours on 4th January 1972, in L-19 (No-003) with 2nd Lieutenant Muhammad Humayun Raza, a Bengali officer of 24 Signal Battalion, on board. The air force agencies and the troops on the Forward Defended Localities were contacted but nothing was known except Major Qasim had taken off from Satrah. Soon after, the BBC and the All India Radio broke the news of the hijacking of a L-19 and that Major Qasim had been shot dead.

It was revealed later, that when Major Qasim landed at Satrah, 2nd Lieutenant Humayun Raza contacted him and requested for a lift to Gujranwala. (This Bengali officer had gone through the aviation aptitude test before the war.) Major Qasim in his usual helpful attitude and politeness promised to pick him up after he completed his mission. He, however, also advised him to get permission from the divisional headquarters for the airlift. After dropping the brigade commander in Pasrur, Major Qasim, on his way back, landed at Satrah to pick up this officer, not knowing that the passenger had different plans and was going to be his assassin.

According to the team responsible for maintaining the strip, Major Qasim took off and then made a circuit as if to land back but went around on finals. This information, and the position of the wounds after post mortem, revealed that one bullet was fired at the right cheek which went through the left cheek and the second bullet was fired from the right ear which penetrated the brain. It indicates that 2nd Lieutenant Raza probably had threatened Major Qasim to turn towards India soon after take off, but on refusal, and seeing him attempting to land back, fired the first ound. This first round was not fatal and Major Qasim still attempted to land back. This is also validated by the accounts of eye witnesses on ground, who described the aircraft banking and then straightening up. It is at this stage that Humayun fired the second fatal round. After shooting Major Qasim, this officer knowing a bit of flying, flew towards India.

A few words about the assassin. More than the so-called patriotism, assassin Raza wanted to avoid the punishment he was to receive from the divisional commander the following day for driving without license and over running an old woman.

Major Qasim's body was received from India on 7th January 1972 ie, after four days of his shahadat. Major Qasim was awarded Sitara-i-Jur'at for the act of bravery and supreme sacrifice in an effort to uphold the honour of his motherland. Later, Army Aviation Base Dhamial was named after Major Muhammad Qasim. It is now known as Qasim Army Aviation Base.

Major Muhammad Qasim was born on 1 st October 1939 in Village Adina, District Mardan. He was commissioned in the Corps of Signals in October 1960. He attended Basic Flying Course P-6 in 1964 and was posted to 1 Army Aviation Squadron. He took active part in 1965 War and flew many operational sorties. In 1969 he qualified as Flying Instructor on L-19 from Flying Instructor School, PAF Academy. Major Qasim served as instructor in Army Aviation School from 1969 to 1971, and in the last week of November 1971, he was attached with 2 Army Aviation Squadron.
_______________________

Excerpted from the book "History of Army Aviation 1947-2007" by Maj Gen Mohammad Azam (Retd)
 

Fawadqasim1

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It was early morning of 4 th January 1972 when Major Muhammad Qasim took off from Gujranwala Strip (a flight of 2 Army Aviation Squadron had been moved to Gujranwala to support the operations of field formations). It was late in the afternoon when flight headquarters at Gujranwala received a telephone call from GSO-2. The caller wanted to talk to Major Qasim and apologized for not sending the vehicle at Satrah Strip where Major Qasim was to land. He was surprised when informed that Major Qasim had not returned, as according to him Major Qasim had left an hour ago.

It was then that the search for the missing aircraft started. All the inquiries revealed that Major Qasim took off from Satrah for Gujranwala at 1200 hours on 4th January 1972, in L-19 (No-003) with 2nd Lieutenant Muhammad Humayun Raza, a Bengali officer of 24 Signal Battalion, on board. The air force agencies and the troops on the Forward Defended Localities were contacted but nothing was known except Major Qasim had taken off from Satrah. Soon after, the BBC and the All India Radio broke the news of the hijacking of a L-19 and that Major Qasim had been shot dead.

It was revealed later, that when Major Qasim landed at Satrah, 2nd Lieutenant Humayun Raza contacted him and requested for a lift to Gujranwala. (This Bengali officer had gone through the aviation aptitude test before the war.) Major Qasim in his usual helpful attitude and politeness promised to pick him up after he completed his mission. He, however, also advised him to get permission from the divisional headquarters for the airlift. After dropping the brigade commander in Pasrur, Major Qasim, on his way back, landed at Satrah to pick up this officer, not knowing that the passenger had different plans and was going to be his assassin.

According to the team responsible for maintaining the strip, Major Qasim took off and then made a circuit as if to land back but went around on finals. This information, and the position of the wounds after post mortem, revealed that one bullet was fired at the right cheek which went through the left cheek and the second bullet was fired from the right ear which penetrated the brain. It indicates that 2nd Lieutenant Raza probably had threatened Major Qasim to turn towards India soon after take off, but on refusal, and seeing him attempting to land back, fired the first ound. This first round was not fatal and Major Qasim still attempted to land back. This is also validated by the accounts of eye witnesses on ground, who described the aircraft banking and then straightening up. It is at this stage that Humayun fired the second fatal round. After shooting Major Qasim, this officer knowing a bit of flying, flew towards India.

A few words about the assassin. More than the so-called patriotism, assassin Raza wanted to avoid the punishment he was to receive from the divisional commander the following day for driving without license and over running an old woman.

Major Qasim's body was received from India on 7th January 1972 ie, after four days of his shahadat. Major Qasim was awarded Sitara-i-Jur'at for the act of bravery and supreme sacrifice in an effort to uphold the honour of his motherland. Later, Army Aviation Base Dhamial was named after Major Muhammad Qasim. It is now known as Qasim Army Aviation Base.

Major Muhammad Qasim was born on 1 st October 1939 in Village Adina, District Mardan. He was commissioned in the Corps of Signals in October 1960. He attended Basic Flying Course P-6 in 1964 and was posted to 1 Army Aviation Squadron. He took active part in 1965 War and flew many operational sorties. In 1969 he qualified as Flying Instructor on L-19 from Flying Instructor School, PAF Academy. Major Qasim served as instructor in Army Aviation School from 1969 to 1971, and in the last week of November 1971, he was attached with 2 Army Aviation Squadron.
_______________________

Excerpted from the book "History of Army Aviation 1947-2007" by Maj Gen Mohammad Azam (Retd)
My father
 

Ahmet Pasha

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It was early morning of 4 th January 1972 when Major Muhammad Qasim took off from Gujranwala Strip (a flight of 2 Army Aviation Squadron had been moved to Gujranwala to support the operations of field formations). It was late in the afternoon when flight headquarters at Gujranwala received a telephone call from GSO-2. The caller wanted to talk to Major Qasim and apologized for not sending the vehicle at Satrah Strip where Major Qasim was to land. He was surprised when informed that Major Qasim had not returned, as according to him Major Qasim had left an hour ago.

It was then that the search for the missing aircraft started. All the inquiries revealed that Major Qasim took off from Satrah for Gujranwala at 1200 hours on 4th January 1972, in L-19 (No-003) with 2nd Lieutenant Muhammad Humayun Raza, a Bengali officer of 24 Signal Battalion, on board. The air force agencies and the troops on the Forward Defended Localities were contacted but nothing was known except Major Qasim had taken off from Satrah. Soon after, the BBC and the All India Radio broke the news of the hijacking of a L-19 and that Major Qasim had been shot dead.

It was revealed later, that when Major Qasim landed at Satrah, 2nd Lieutenant Humayun Raza contacted him and requested for a lift to Gujranwala. (This Bengali officer had gone through the aviation aptitude test before the war.) Major Qasim in his usual helpful attitude and politeness promised to pick him up after he completed his mission. He, however, also advised him to get permission from the divisional headquarters for the airlift. After dropping the brigade commander in Pasrur, Major Qasim, on his way back, landed at Satrah to pick up this officer, not knowing that the passenger had different plans and was going to be his assassin.

According to the team responsible for maintaining the strip, Major Qasim took off and then made a circuit as if to land back but went around on finals. This information, and the position of the wounds after post mortem, revealed that one bullet was fired at the right cheek which went through the left cheek and the second bullet was fired from the right ear which penetrated the brain. It indicates that 2nd Lieutenant Raza probably had threatened Major Qasim to turn towards India soon after take off, but on refusal, and seeing him attempting to land back, fired the first ound. This first round was not fatal and Major Qasim still attempted to land back. This is also validated by the accounts of eye witnesses on ground, who described the aircraft banking and then straightening up. It is at this stage that Humayun fired the second fatal round. After shooting Major Qasim, this officer knowing a bit of flying, flew towards India.

A few words about the assassin. More than the so-called patriotism, assassin Raza wanted to avoid the punishment he was to receive from the divisional commander the following day for driving without license and over running an old woman.

Major Qasim's body was received from India on 7th January 1972 ie, after four days of his shahadat. Major Qasim was awarded Sitara-i-Jur'at for the act of bravery and supreme sacrifice in an effort to uphold the honour of his motherland. Later, Army Aviation Base Dhamial was named after Major Muhammad Qasim. It is now known as Qasim Army Aviation Base.

Major Muhammad Qasim was born on 1 st October 1939 in Village Adina, District Mardan. He was commissioned in the Corps of Signals in October 1960. He attended Basic Flying Course P-6 in 1964 and was posted to 1 Army Aviation Squadron. He took active part in 1965 War and flew many operational sorties. In 1969 he qualified as Flying Instructor on L-19 from Flying Instructor School, PAF Academy. Major Qasim served as instructor in Army Aviation School from 1969 to 1971, and in the last week of November 1971, he was attached with 2 Army Aviation Squadron.
_______________________

Excerpted from the book "History of Army Aviation 1947-2007" by Maj Gen Mohammad Azam (Retd)
Isn't it a recurring thing the Rashid Minhas episode bengali guy was also doing same thing. Did they have directions to do these exact same things from behind??

Also why PAA pilots have to learn how to fly Mushak if they are going to fly Helicopters? Does army operate K8s?? Or for C208 Grand caravans, King airs and VIP business jets?(but these are very small in number)
 

Fawadqasim1

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Isn't it a recurring thing the Rashid Minhas episode bengali guy was also doing same thing. Did they have directions to do these exact same things from behind??

Also why PAA pilots have to learn how to fly Mushak if they are going to fly Helicopters? Does army operate K8s?? Or for C208 Grand caravans, King airs and VIP business jets?(but these are very small in number)
It was not mushak but an L19 in which seating arrangement is in tandem not side by side
We honor and thank your father for his great sacrifice.
Thanks
 
Last edited:

Fawadqasim1

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Last edited:

HRK

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My father
It was a difficult journey as an orphan but yes Absolutely he made us proud.
Salute to your farther for his act of great valour for the Honour of the Nation but our words are not enough to pay homage to any Shaheed and to his family as Shahadat is always only the first step taken the Shaheed himself but the rest of journey is undertook by the family of Shaheed for the rest of their lives.
 

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