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Pak- Afghan war

That Guy

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Question @ghazi52 .

Why are you saying "leftist" intellectuals don't talk about it? What's the reason for singling them out, when the right wing are just as guilty of not talking about it?

In fact, the first time I even heard about this was from a yale university journal.

Pakistan as a collective seems to only talk about post-1979, it's a collective failure of Pakistan of keeping track of it's own rich and vibrant history.
 

ghazi52

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Pakistan Border Battles

A Story of No. 9 Griffin and No. 14 Shaheen Squadron.

Squadron leader Hamid Qadri from Squadron No. 9
May 17th, 1986
Squadron Leader Badar from Squadron No. 14,
April 16th, 1987
Squadron Leader Athar Bokhari from Squadron No. 14,
April 8th, 1988
Flight Lieutenant Khalid Mahmood from Squadron No. 14,
September 12th, 1988
Flight Lieutenant Khalid Mahmood from Squadron No. 14,
November 3rd, 1988




DatePilot Name & AF UnitAircraft Flown
Base
Kills
Aircraft/Pilot
Comments
17 May 1986Sqn. Ldr. A. Hameed Qadri
No. 9 Squadron, PAF
F-16A Fighting Falcon
(S. No. 82-723)
PAF Sargodha
2 Soviet/Afghan Su-22sShot down both Su-22s in a single sortie 16,000 ft. over Parachinar, Pakistan. 1 AIM-9L Sidewinder Kill, 1 Gun Kill.
30 March 1987Wng. Cdr. Abdul Razzaq
No. 9 Squadron, PAF
F-16A Fighting Falcon
PAF Sargodha
1 Soviet/Afghan An-26Shot down near Miranshah, Pakistan while on a recce mission.
16 April 1987Sqn. Ldr. Badar Islam
No. 14 Squadron, PAF
F-16A Fighting Falcon
PAF Minhas (Kamra)
1 Soviet/Afghan Su-22Shot down after strafing Pakistani villages near Tull, Pakistan along with another Su-22 and with a pair of MiG-23MLDs flying top cover. Remaining 3 aircraft bugged out.
8 April 1988Sqn. Ldr. Athar Bokhari
No. 14 Squadron, PAF
F-16A Fighting Falcon
(S. No. 85-725)
PAF Minhas (Kamra)
1 Soviet Su-25
Col. Ruskoi Alexander Valadimirovich, Soviet Air Force (ejected)
1 PAF F-16 Vs. 4 Soviet Su-25s. Night interception over Parachinar, Pakistan. AIM-9L Sidewinder Kill. Remaining 3 Su-25s bugged out. Soviet Su-25 pilot, Col. Ruskoi Alexander Valadimirovich, (later Vice-President of Russia) was taken prisoner by Pakistani authorities.
12 September 1988Flt. Lt. Khalid Mahmood
No. 14 Squadron, PAF
F-16A Fighting Falcon
(S. No. 85-728) PAF Minhas (Kamra)
2 Soviet MiG-23MLDs2 PAF F-16s Vs. 6 Soviet MiG-23s. Near Nawagai border area with Pakistan. Both Kills in a single sortie with AIM-9L and AIM-9P Sidewinders.
3 November 1988Flt. Lt. Khalid Mahmood
No. 14 Squadron, PAF
F-16A Fighting Falcon
(S. No. 84-717)
PAF Minhas (Kamra)
1 Afghan Air Force Su-22
Capt. Hashim, AAF (ejected)
2 PAF F-16s Vs. 6 Soviet/Afghan Su-22s. (3 on ground attack and 3 flying top cover) near Tull, Pakistan. Kill made with 2 AIM-9L Sidewinders. Afghan pilot, Capt. Hashim, was captured after bailing out.
20/21 November 1988(Rank?) Muhammad Abbas Khattak
No. 14 Squadron, PAF
F-16A Fighting Falcon
PAF Minhas (Kamra)
1 Soviet An-26Shot down while on a recce mission inside Pakistan. PAF pilot later Chief of the Air Staff, PAF, 1994-1997.
31 January 1989Flt. Lt. Khalid Mahmood
No. 14 Squadron, PAF
F-16B Fighting Falcon
PAF Minhas (Kamra)
1 Soviet An-24Night interception near Bannu, Pakistan while on a solo 'hot scramble'. An-24 on bombing run crashed while attempting to surrender. Thus credited as 'manoeuvre kill'.
Total:10 Air-to-Air KillsNOTE: This table does not include all the PAF Kill figures for the 1979-1988 Soviet-Afghan War which remain classified with the PAF.
 

ghazi52

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Parushapura "Peshawar" Was The Capital Of The Kushan Empire Which Ruled Much Of South & Central Asia.



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A High-Resolution Map Of India In The 2nd Century C.E. From Joppen's ''Historical Atlas Of India'', 1907, Showing The "Kushan Empire" During "Kanishka's Reign".

Most Historians Consider The Empire To Have Variously Extended As Far East As The Middle Ganges Plain, To Varanasi On The Confluence Of The Ganges And The Jumna, Or Probably Even Pataliputra.
 

ghazi52

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Murree was a British hill station near Rawalpindi. The Afghan peace delegation stayed their before signing the Treaty of Rawalpindi which formally ended the 3rd Afghan War (1919) on 8 August 1919. The treaty finally gave the Afghans the right to conduct their own foreign affairs as a fully independent state.

For the British, the Durand Line, long a contentious issue between the two nations, was reaffirmed as the political boundary separating Afghanistan from the North West Frontier.

The Afghans also agreed to stop interfering with the tribes on the British side of the line.



Afghan Peace Delegates At Murree, Circa 1919.


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ghazi52

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Sir Henry Mortimer Durand In Dera Ismail Khan, Circa 1903.


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Architect Of The Durand Line Sir Henry Mortimer Durand, British Diplomat And Civil Servant Of Colonial British India. The Durand Line Is Named after him.


The Durand Line was ratified in Aug 1919, as international border.
 

ghazi52

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An Infantry In Action Against Afridis In Khajuri Plains, Circa 1930.


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The Afridi Redshirt Rebellion was a military campaign conducted by British and Indian armies against Afridi tribesmen in the North West Frontier region of the Indian Empire, now in Pakistan in 1930–1931.

The Afridi are a Karlani Pashtun tribe who inhabit the border area of Pakistan, notably in the Spin Ghar mountain range to the west of Peshawar and the Maidan Valley in Tirah.

The Afridi's often clashed with the British and Indian Armies during India’s expansion towards the Afghan border, notably during the Anglo-Afghan Wars.

In the summer of 1930 a rebellion by dissident Afridi tribesmen, known as Redshirts, broke out. As this threatened the security of Peshawar, two Brigade Groups were sent to occupy the Khajuri Plain, west of Peshawar and south of the Khyber Pass. Their role was to open up the area by constructing roads and strong points.

This would help prevent any future tribal infiltration towards Peshawar as well as being a punitive measure, since the Afridis had been accustomed to pasture their flocks on this low ground during the winter months.

On 17 October 1930 the British-led force crossed into the Tirah Valley at Bara, six miles from Peshawar, and advanced a further seven miles to Miri Khel. Here a fortified camp was constructed from which operations against the Afridis were conducted. On 16 January 1931, the force was withdrawn, having accomplished its objective.

British and Indian Army forces that took part in the campaign received the India General Service Medal with the clasp North West Frontier 1930-31.
 

ghazi52

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Habibullah Khan The Amir Of Afghanistan (Reign 1901 - 1919) .
Arrival At Rawalpindi, January 1907.


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...



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ghazi52

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Soldiers In Action At Thal (Present Day District Hangu) During The 3rd Afghan War in 1919.


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In early May 1919, the point of the central theatre most threatened was Parachinar, isolated from Thal up the Kurram Valley.

Reacting to initial reports of Nadir Khan’s concentration at Matun, the Kurram Militia, part of the British-Indian force, pushed forward picquets (advanced guards) to the border in the vicinity of Peiwar Kotal, Kharlarchi and Lakka Tiga. There, they observed Afghan movements and tried to identify the direction of Nadir Khan’s main attack. Khan moved on May 23, heading south-east, down the Kaitu, threatening both Bannu and Thal.

In the face of this threat, the Waziristan Militia evacuated the Spinwam border post the next day, as well as other garrisons along the Upper Tochi River in North Waziristan. Then a number of the militia deserted the British while the Wazirs rose up and joined the Afghans. Nadir Kahn occupied Spinwam on May 25 with a force of 3,000 Afghan infantry, field howitzers and pack guns, and a large force of tribesmen from Khost and Waziristan. He was now equidistant from Thal and Bannu.

The British reinforced Thal from Kohat, diverting forces which might otherwise have been used to continue the invasion of Afghanistan through the Khyber. On the morning of May 27, Nadir Khan then appeared to the north-west of Thal, invested it and opened fire with his artillery, cutting off the forces in Parachinar and the Upper Kurram.

The British had prepared for such an eventuality by improving the defence lines. However, the water supply was a potential weakness. Despite being bombed by the RAF, Khan's artillery outranged that of the British and was causing considerable damage, and he started to push the defences in towards the water supply. At the same time, the skirmishes on the frontiers increased in intensity, particularly around Peiwar Kotal, Kharlarchi and Lakka Tiga.

Meanwhile, at Kohat, Brigadier General Dyer (the same man who’d ordered the aforementioned massacre in India) assembled a column of infantry, guns, machine guns and a few lorries for the relief of Thal. Dyer marched with his men on May 31 and successfully relieved Thal the following day (lorries aside, most men went on foot.)

In early June, he drove Khan back into Afghanistan. Gregory Fremont-Barnes quotes Dyer’s biographer in his book ‘The Anglo-Afghan Wars’, giving a glimpse into what the fighting conditions must have been like. In many ways, they were much the same as they are today:

“At Togh, the General addressed his troops, exhorting them to make a great effort to rescue their comrades at Thal. His words touched the hearts of that strangely assorted force of veterans and war levies, Punjabi peasants and London men of business so that they marched to the last of their strength, some of them dropped in their tracks. At four o’clock in the morning on 31 May they set out along a fairly open valley between steep hills. There was no wind and but little water, and as the day advanced the stony hillsides became a furnace, the naked rocks throwing back the sun so that it seemed to strike from the ground as from the sky.”

Source - Action At Badama Post: The Third Afghan War, 1919 By Paul Macro.
 

ghazi52

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Peshawar Valley Field Force advancing through the Khyber Pass, 1878-9 (c).

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Photograph of troops from the Peshawar Valley Field Force advancing through the Khyber Pass, using a road built by Colonel Mackeson during the First Anglo-Afghan War (1839-42). A large group of soldiers, wearing uniform and carrying guns, are standing and sitting along a road built into the rocky mountainside.
 

ghazi52

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The Afghan Mission in Kabul, 1915-16 (c).

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From left to right the photograph shows Kâzım Orbay, Werner von Hentig, Walter Röhr, Mahendra Pratap, Kurt Wagner, Oskar Niedermayer, Günther Voigt and Maulavi Barkatullah.

The Afghan Mission was a collective of Indian, German and Ottoman military and diplomatic personnel sent to Kabul to try to convince Emir Habibullah of Afghanistan to join the Central Powers and rise up in a Jihad against the British in India.

The Indian nationalists hoped this would lead to a free and independent India while the German and Ottoman plan was to disrupt British and Russian interests in the area enough to force them to withdraw troops from other fronts.

The mission travelled overland on a gruelling and perilous march through Persia to Afghanistan splitting into small groups at times to avoid British and Russian patrols. Those that made it finally reached reached Kabul on 2nd October 1915.

They ultimately failed to convince the Emir (who was cleverly accepting bribes from both sides while remaining neutral) to join the war and the Germans left Kabul via different routes in May 1916. The Indian nationalists remained to set up a Provisional Indian Government in exile which was disbanded in 1918.

© Stiftung Bibliotheca Afghanica
 

Arsalan345

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View attachment 693537





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The Wakhan Corridor is a narrow strip of territory in Afghanistan, extending to China and separating Tajikistan from Pakistan Chitral and Gilgit

Pakistan ( Karakoram Highway ) Tajikistan ( Pamir Highway ) link by Wakhan Corridor from Lowari Tunnel is possible ?

Chitral-Ishkashim-Dushanbe Route 135 km is shortest route for Pakistan and Tajikistan...



View attachment 693540
View attachment 693541
we should annex it. This is so important for us for many reasons.
 

Arsalan345

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i think for wasting our useless time on this afghan war, we should be gifted parts of afghanistan but nobody will give us anything. be brave and annex. nobody will intervene. just do it.
 

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