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ghazi52

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Mar 21, 2007
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Women as fighter pilots !!!

How successful they will be is anybody’s guess. I would like to put you guys in the shoes of a fighter pilot and then decide for yourself.

In the month of June, noon, temperature around 50 degrees C and humidity 80%, PAF Base Mianwali, Main Tarmac. Around 40 aircrafts ( FT-5 & F-7s) neatly parked in three rows. You leave squadrons building for a low level strike to Dhok Pathan Bridge, you pick your helmet and walk towards the flight lines. Second mission of the day is about to start up. It’s difficult to do the exterior inspection because the panels are so so hot that you cant check them properly. Drop tanks burning with heat. Heat has already started to take a toll on your body and you are sweating badly. You get into the aircraft but cannot touch the stick and switches. Crew chief straps you; you wear your helmet, connect the G-suit hose and R/T lead , lock the canopy down and wait for the IP.

By the time you start ,your coverall is completely wet with the sweat. You Startup, taxi and finally line up. The pressure of accurate navigation ahead and making your target good is immense. Finally your left hand goes full forward and the right gradually comes back. Out of traffic pattern you set course on first heading trying to maintain 250 feet AGL accurately on altimeter. Pressure is continuously mounting. At first turn in point, you are late by 15 seconds and off track by half nautical mile. Guy in the back seat ( GIBS) is not at all happy. You start to panic and tire your self badly.

Once you enter the Murid area, Cherat Control wants you to make a dog leg because two A-5s are doing lo level GCI around Murid. You get into more panic but control your wits and make the second and third turning points good. At last you reach your IP, pullup but its too late. You miss the target because you never selected the switches in panic. GIBS start to shout more and more and you wish for a moment that either he or you shouldn’t had been there. Finally you recover, land taxi back and switch off. Sweaty, tired and heart broken you walk back to squadron. Your legs are shaking with weakness and dehydration is taking its toll. After a nightmarish debrief from instructor you retreat your self in cool environments of crew room. Suddenly one of your coursemates informs you that because of unfitness of one of the pilots you are scheduled for 1V1 mission and instructor is calling for a brief. And the whole chain of event starts again.............

Its not a fiction but just a highlight of the situation one faces during training and even later on. The purpose of the narration was that its a tough life out there. Not only physically but one has to be mentally fit to take any beating.

Fighter flying in one of the loveliest thing in the world but it comes with a price. I have seen well built guys crumbling under the pressures. I know people refusing flying because they couldn’t handle the pressures. It’s a dog eat dog life out there.

Once you are done with your operational conversion, the squadron life begins. Its tough. Everybody is good and very professional. You have to prove yourself. Ops conversion, pair leader, section leader, nights ops, specialised weapons ops, Air combat, deployments, exercises ….training never seems to end and with each stage the things get difficult and challenging.

I have no doubts about the mental strength of our women, they are hardworking and professional. But the big question is that do you really think that they will be able to take this physical beating for next 17 to 18 years as a fighter pilot ?

1638892035573.png
 

khanasifm

SENIOR MEMBER
Apr 16, 2008
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Women as fighter pilots !!!

How successful they will be is anybody’s guess. I would like to put you guys in the shoes of a fighter pilot and then decide for yourself.

In the month of June, noon, temperature around 50 degrees C and humidity 80%, PAF Base Mianwali, Main Tarmac. Around 40 aircrafts ( FT-5 & F-7s) neatly parked in three rows. You leave squadrons building for a low level strike to Dhok Pathan Bridge, you pick your helmet and walk towards the flight lines. Second mission of the day is about to start up. It’s difficult to do the exterior inspection because the panels are so so hot that you cant check them properly. Drop tanks burning with heat. Heat has already started to take a toll on your body and you are sweating badly. You get into the aircraft but cannot touch the stick and switches. Crew chief straps you; you wear your helmet, connect the G-suit hose and R/T lead , lock the canopy down and wait for the IP.

By the time you start ,your coverall is completely wet with the sweat. You Startup, taxi and finally line up. The pressure of accurate navigation ahead and making your target good is immense. Finally your left hand goes full forward and the right gradually comes back. Out of traffic pattern you set course on first heading trying to maintain 250 feet AGL accurately on altimeter. Pressure is continuously mounting. At first turn in point, you are late by 15 seconds and off track by half nautical mile. Guy in the back seat ( GIBS) is not at all happy. You start to panic and tire your self badly.

Once you enter the Murid area, Cherat Control wants you to make a dog leg because two A-5s are doing lo level GCI around Murid. You get into more panic but control your wits and make the second and third turning points good. At last you reach your IP, pullup but its too late. You miss the target because you never selected the switches in panic. GIBS start to shout more and more and you wish for a moment that either he or you shouldn’t had been there. Finally you recover, land taxi back and switch off. Sweaty, tired and heart broken you walk back to squadron. Your legs are shaking with weakness and dehydration is taking its toll. After a nightmarish debrief from instructor you retreat your self in cool environments of crew room. Suddenly one of your coursemates informs you that because of unfitness of one of the pilots you are scheduled for 1V1 mission and instructor is calling for a brief. And the whole chain of event starts again.............

Its not a fiction but just a highlight of the situation one faces during training and even later on. The purpose of the narration was that its a tough life out there. Not only physically but one has to be mentally fit to take any beating.

Fighter flying in one of the loveliest thing in the world but it comes with a price. I have seen well built guys crumbling under the pressures. I know people refusing flying because they couldn’t handle the pressures. It’s a dog eat dog life out there.

Once you are done with your operational conversion, the squadron life begins. Its tough. Everybody is good and very professional. You have to prove yourself. Ops conversion, pair leader, section leader, nights ops, specialised weapons ops, Air combat, deployments, exercises ….training never seems to end and with each stage the things get difficult and challenging.

I have no doubts about the mental strength of our women, they are hardworking and professional. But the big question is that do you really think that they will be able to take this physical beating for next 17 to 18 years as a fighter pilot ?

View attachment 799499

Work fine at USAF RAF etc as for as PAF it’s more social or society problem than professional

Mostly husbands , infact learned paf cheif spoke to Nigerians as they are Muslim and successful with female pilots program and the answer was female pilots decision but let the husband go if they are problem for professional growth of female pilots and others as well .

Other BS negated by women all over the world 🌍
 

Raider 21

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Feb 18, 2016
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Women as fighter pilots !!!

How successful they will be is anybody’s guess. I would like to put you guys in the shoes of a fighter pilot and then decide for yourself.

In the month of June, noon, temperature around 50 degrees C and humidity 80%, PAF Base Mianwali, Main Tarmac. Around 40 aircrafts ( FT-5 & F-7s) neatly parked in three rows. You leave squadrons building for a low level strike to Dhok Pathan Bridge, you pick your helmet and walk towards the flight lines. Second mission of the day is about to start up. It’s difficult to do the exterior inspection because the panels are so so hot that you cant check them properly. Drop tanks burning with heat. Heat has already started to take a toll on your body and you are sweating badly. You get into the aircraft but cannot touch the stick and switches. Crew chief straps you; you wear your helmet, connect the G-suit hose and R/T lead , lock the canopy down and wait for the IP.

By the time you start ,your coverall is completely wet with the sweat. You Startup, taxi and finally line up. The pressure of accurate navigation ahead and making your target good is immense. Finally your left hand goes full forward and the right gradually comes back. Out of traffic pattern you set course on first heading trying to maintain 250 feet AGL accurately on altimeter. Pressure is continuously mounting. At first turn in point, you are late by 15 seconds and off track by half nautical mile. Guy in the back seat ( GIBS) is not at all happy. You start to panic and tire your self badly.

Once you enter the Murid area, Cherat Control wants you to make a dog leg because two A-5s are doing lo level GCI around Murid. You get into more panic but control your wits and make the second and third turning points good. At last you reach your IP, pullup but its too late. You miss the target because you never selected the switches in panic. GIBS start to shout more and more and you wish for a moment that either he or you shouldn’t had been there. Finally you recover, land taxi back and switch off. Sweaty, tired and heart broken you walk back to squadron. Your legs are shaking with weakness and dehydration is taking its toll. After a nightmarish debrief from instructor you retreat your self in cool environments of crew room. Suddenly one of your coursemates informs you that because of unfitness of one of the pilots you are scheduled for 1V1 mission and instructor is calling for a brief. And the whole chain of event starts again.............

Its not a fiction but just a highlight of the situation one faces during training and even later on. The purpose of the narration was that its a tough life out there. Not only physically but one has to be mentally fit to take any beating.

Fighter flying in one of the loveliest thing in the world but it comes with a price. I have seen well built guys crumbling under the pressures. I know people refusing flying because they couldn’t handle the pressures. It’s a dog eat dog life out there.

Once you are done with your operational conversion, the squadron life begins. Its tough. Everybody is good and very professional. You have to prove yourself. Ops conversion, pair leader, section leader, nights ops, specialised weapons ops, Air combat, deployments, exercises ….training never seems to end and with each stage the things get difficult and challenging.

I have no doubts about the mental strength of our women, they are hardworking and professional. But the big question is that do you really think that they will be able to take this physical beating for next 17 to 18 years as a fighter pilot ?

View attachment 799499
Sir what's the source of this post. I read A-5s and I am wondering if this has been written a while back.
 

GriffinsRule

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Nov 18, 2015
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Work fine at USAF RAF etc as for as PAF it’s more social or society problem than professional

Mostly husbands , infact learned paf cheif spoke to Nigerians as they are Muslim and successful with female pilots program and the answer was female pilots decision but let the husband go if they are problem for professional growth of female pilots and others as well .

Other BS negated by women all over the world 🌍
It was Swedish female fighter pilot that made that comment, not a Nigerian. Its mentioned in one of the PAF books
 

ghazi52

PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST
Mar 21, 2007
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"The Man who shot down an Israeli Air Force jet"


Air Cdre (R) Abdus Sattar Alvi (1st left) with squadron mates in front of Shenyang F-6 From CCS of PAF.

1639525511813.png


When the Yom Kippur war broke out, Alvi was one of the Pakistan Air Force fighter pilots who volunteered to go to the Middle East in order to support Egypt and Syria. By the time they arrived, however, Egypt and Israel had already concluded a ceasefire and only Syria remained in an active state of war against Israel.Alvi, who was serving at a rank of Flight Lieutenant in 1973.The PAF fighter pilots flew in a formation using the call-sign "Shahbaz".

On 26 April, 1974, PAF fighter pilot Flight Lieutenant Sattar Alvi on deputation to No. 67A Squadron, Syrian Air Force (SAF) was flying a SAF MiG-21F-13 Fishbed (Serial No. 1863) out of Dumayr Air Base, Syria in an eight-ship formation with a fellow PAF pilot and the Flight Leader, Squadron Leader Arif Manzoor.
Alvi came to a worldwide international notice when he had shot down the IAF's Mirage IIICJ flown by Captain M. Lutz. On 26 April 1974, while on an aerial patrol, the PAF fighter pilots team including, Flight Lieutenant Captain Sattar Alvi, Squadron Leader Major Saleem Metla and the formation's leader Squadron Leader Major Arif Manzoor. The Shahbaz faced an encounter over Golan Heights between a Mig-21 of the Syrian Air Force and two Israeli Mirages.


While leading a Mig-21 patrol along the border, Squadron Leader Arif Manzoor apprised of the presence of two Israeli Phantom aircraft and was cautioned that these could be decoys while two other fast tracks approaching from the opposite direction might be the real threat. The latter turned out to be Mirages and a moment later Alvi, in Arif’s formation saw the No 2 Mirage breaking towards him.

All this time, heavy radio jamming by Israeli ground stations was making things difficult but the Pakistani pilots were used to such tactics. Sattar forced the Israeli pair into close combat, firing his K-13 missile at the first opportunity. The Israeli wingman’s Mirage exploded into a ball of fire, while the leader quickly disengaged.

After the engagements, Flight Lieutenant Captain Sattar Alvi and Shahbaz formation leader Squadron Leader Major Arif Manzoor were awarded two of Syria’s highest decorations for gallantry, the Wisaam Faris and Wisaam Shuja’at in 1973 by the President of Syria Hafez al-Assad in a public ceremony. The government of Pakistan also awarded the PAF fight pilot Sitara-e-Jur’at each. The prime minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto personally met each of them and awarded the gallantry awards in a public ceremonies.
 

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