What's new

Oh Syria the Victory is Coming | Sheikh Muhammad Al Arifi

Cem_

FULL MEMBER
Mar 13, 2012
365
0
265
I've completely changed my mind on Syria after listening to this speaker..

I hope we (the Turks) will be the ones who are soon honoured to be the ones who will liberate our Syrian neigbors from the tryant called Assad.


 
Last edited by a moderator:

BLACKEAGLE

ELITE MEMBER
May 9, 2007
10,919
2
18,646
Country
Jordan
Location
Jordan
Inshallah our Syrian brothers are victorious. Anyone who truly believe in God will be sure of Allah's pledge to grant victory to his pious and oppressed servants. Allah even grants victory to the oppressed non-believers.
 

lem34

FULL MEMBER

New Recruit

Jun 3, 2011
4
0
17,862
Inshallah our Syrian brothers are victorious. Anyone who truly believe in God will be sure of Allah's pledge to grant victory to his pious and oppressed servants. Allah even grants victory to the oppressed non-believers.


Well I hope their victory is not like the Libyan, Iraqi or Afghan brothers victories
 

Cem_

FULL MEMBER
Mar 13, 2012
365
0
265
Syrian refugees flood into Turkey

Istanbul, Turkey (CNN) -- The Turkish government reported a record number of refugees fleeing Syrian military offensives across the border, just days before the Syrian government pledged to withdraw military forces from population centers.

In 24 hours, at least 2,741 Syrians fled down smugglers' paths to the barbed wire border fence, where they were met by Turkish border guards, the Prime Ministry Disaster and Emergency Management Directorate said. More than 23,000 Syrian refugees now reside in Turkey.

The surge prompted Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu to make a 2 a.m. phone call to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, inviting U.N. officials to witness the growing refugee crisis firsthand.

Davutoglu also told the U.N. chief he was receiving reports of Syrian military operations backed by helicopters from across the border.


"They are burning all the houses," one Syrian woman told journalists at the border late Thursday, as she sat with other refugees in a van awaiting transport to a nearby refugee camp in Turkey.

"It was a massacre in a Taftanaz," said another woman, who asked not to be named for security reasons. "They butchered the people; they shelled and fired rockets; they displaced us. Bashar [al Assad] is an oppressor and a dog. May God have no mercy on him."

On Thursday night, opposition activists sent CNN video and photos of the devastated northern town of Taftanaz.

The small rebel stronghold had been the target of days and nights of artillery bombardment as well as strafing from Syrian military helicopters.

On Thursday afternoon, Syrian security forces observed a cease-fire, opposition activists said, allowing Syrian Red Crescent workers to collect bodies.

Video shot on Thursday showed dozens of corpses, all of them male and some of them dressed in camouflage uniforms, laid out on the floor of the Al Kabir mosque in Taftanaz.

Later, many of the dead were placed in a long, deep trench for burial. Grieving residents gathered around the mass grave.

The total number of refugees fleeing grisly scenes like this has dramatically increased.

Until now, the Turkish government has refused offers of assistance from international aid organizations like the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and has restricted access to the refugee camps.

But on Friday, Foreign Minister Davutoglu suggested that a policy change was in the works.

"It is important for the international community to take a very clear stance with regard to the refugee flow now," he said. Davutoglu said he asked the U.N. secretary-general to take a "much more active role" in the refugee crisis.

Several regional policy experts have predicted that a dramatic increase in refugees streaming across the Syrian border may prompt Turkey to move forward on plans to establish a "buffer zone" on Syrian territory

"So far, the Turkish government kept the [refugee] issue to itself and did not let the United Nations take over," said Ufuk Ulutas, a Middle East expert with the Ankara-based SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research.

"If Turkey receives 2,000 [refugees] every day, I don't think it will be a manageable number for Turkey," Ulutas told CNN, adding, "If the influx is in big numbers, I don't think they will have any other options but to create a buffer zone."

Turkey last hosted huge numbers of refugees after the 1991 Gulf War in neighboring Iraq. The flood of ethnic Kurds fleeing a crackdown by Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein had long-lasting consequences on security in southeastern Turkey, where the Turkish state has long battled a homegrown Kurdish insurgency.

Turkish officials have long denied speculation within the Turkish media about the possibility of a military intervention aimed at establishing a buffer zone in Syria.

A senior Turkish official repeated those denials in a recent interview with CNN.

"We have said all along no safe haven, no buffer zones," the Turkish official said, on condition of anonymity. "We're trying everything we can short of a military intervention ... to convince the Assad regime to stop violence and make a political transition possible."



Syrian refugees flood into Turkey - CNN.com
 

lem34

FULL MEMBER

New Recruit

Jun 3, 2011
4
0
17,862
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ does he see a bright future for Syrians or does he see a similar victory to the one that Libyans got with assistance from America and the likes of Qatar

We want war, and we want it now

By Pepe Escobar

It was deep into the night, somewhere over Siberia, in a Moscow to Beijing flight (BRIC to BRIC?) when the thought, like a lightning bolt, began to take hold.

What the hell is wrong with those Arabs?

Maybe it was the narcotic effect of that perennially dreadful Terminal F at Sheremetyevo airport - straight out of a Brejnev gulag. Maybe it was the anticipation of finding more about the Russia-China joint naval exercise scheduled for late April.

Or it was simply another case of "you can take the boy out of the Middle East, but you can't take the Middle East out of the boy".

With friends like these ... It all had to do with that Friends of Syria (fools for war?) meeting in Istanbul.

Minister Saud al-Faisal - who seems to have a knack for sending US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton into rapture - feverishly arguing that the House of Saud, those paragons of democracy, had "a duty" to weaponize the Syrian "revolutionary" opposition.



No; this was not a Monty Python sketch.

To make sure he was milking the right cow, al-Faisal also said that the Gulf Counter-revolution Club (GCC), also known as Gulf Cooperation Council, wanted to get further into bed with the United States. Translation, if any was needed; the US-GCC tag team, as expressed by the weaponization of the Syrian "rebels", is meant to body slam Iran.

For both the House of Saud and Qatar (the other GCCs are just extras), what's goin' on in Syria is not about Syria; it's always been about Iran.

This especially applies to the Saudi pledge to flood the global oil market with a spare oil production capacity that any self-respecting oil analyst knows they don't have - or rather wouldn't use; after all, the House of Saud badly needs high oil prices to bribe its restive eastern province population into not even thinking about that Arab Spring nonsense.

Clinton got the pledge from the House of Saud in person, before landing in Istanbul. Washington's return gift was of the Pentagon kind; the GCC soon will be protected from "evil" Iran by a US-supplied missile shield. That implies that an attack on Iran may have been discarded for 2012 - but it's certainly "on the table" for 2013.

Asian nations - especially BRICS members China and India - will keep buying oil from Iran; the problem is what the European poodles will do. Other real problems are that the Kurds in northern Iraq are taking their oil off the market until Baghdad pays them the share they had agreed upon. And then there are Syria's 400,000 barrels a day, which have been dwindling over the past few months.

Still, the Saudis will keep playing the make-believe oil scenario as a gift to Washington - as the US pressures compliant European Union poodle economies and extremely wary Asians they have no reason to keep buying Iranian oil.

But then into this mess in Istanbul Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki - whose power is a direct consequence of Washington's invasion and destruction of Iraq - steps in with quite a bang.

Here it is, in his own words:

We reject any arming [of Syrian rebels] and the process to overthrow the [Assad] regime, because this will leave a greater crisis in the region ... The stance of these two states [Qatar and Saudi Arabia] is very strange ... They are calling for sending arms instead of working on putting out the fire, and they will hear our voice, that we are against arming and against foreign interference ... We are against the interference of some countries in Syria's internal affairs, and those countries that are interfering in Syria's internal affairs will interfere in the internal affairs of any country ... It has been one year and the regime did not fall, and it will not fall, and why should it fall?"

Maliki knows very well that the ongoing and already escalating weaponizing of Sunni Syrians - many of the Salafi and jihadi kind - will inevitably spill over into Iraq itself, and threaten his Shi'ite-majority government. And that irrespective of the fact that his administration supports the close Iran-Syria relationship.

Maliki, by the way, was back in power in the autumn of 2010 because Tehran deftly intervened to make sure the Sadrists would support him. To add to Maliki's anger, Qatar is refusing to extradite Iraqi Vice President Tareq al-Hashemi, accused of masterminding a pro-Sunni coup d'etat in Baghdad.

How green was my jihad valley
So Washington is now merrily embarking in a remix of the 1980s Afghan jihad - which, as every grain of sand from the Hindu Kush to Mesopotamia knows, led to that ghostly entity, al-Qaeda, and the subsequent, transformer "war on terror".

The House of Saud and Qatar have institutionalized that motley crew known as the Free Syrian Army as a mercenary outfit; they are now on their payroll, to the tune of $100 million (and counting). Isn't democracy wonderful - when US-allied Persian Gulf monarchies can buy a mercenary army for peanuts? Isn't it great to be a revolutionary with an assured paycheck?

Not missing a beat, Washington has set up its own fund as well, for "humanitarian" assistance to Syria and "non-lethal" aid to the "rebels"; "non-lethal" as in ultra battle-ready satellite communications equipment, plus night-vision goggles. Clinton's silky spin was that the equipment would allow the "rebels" to "evade" attacks by the Syrian government. No mention that now they have access to actionable US intelligence via a swarm of drones deployed all over Syria.

Maliki can clearly see the writing on the (Sunni) wall. The House of Saud invaded Shi'ite-majority Bahrain to protect the extremely unpopular Sunni al-Khalifa dynasty in power - their "cousins". Maliki knows that a post-Assad Syria would mean Muslim Brotherhood Sunnis in power - sprinkled with Salafi-jihadis. In his worst nightmare, Maliki sees this possible dystopian future as an al-Qaeda in Iraq remix on steroids.

So this is what the Istanbul-based "Friends of Syria" bash turned into; a shameless legitimizing - by Arabs allied with the US - of civil war in yet another Arab country. The victims will be average Syrians caught in the crossfire.

This US-GCC weaponizing entirely dissolves the United Nations Syria envoy and former secretary general Kofi Annan's six-point peace plan. The plan calls for a ceasefire; for the Syrian government to "cease troop movements" and "begin pullback of military concentrations"; and for a negotiated political settlement.

There will be no ceasefire. The Assad government accepted the plan. The weaponized "rebels" rejected it. Imagine the Syrian government beginning the "pullback of military concentrations" while swarms of weaponized "rebels" and assorted mercenaries (from Libya, Lebanon and Iraq) keep deploying their torture tactics and launching a barrage of improvised explosive devices.

I landed in Beijing eager to learn more about the upcoming joint Russia-China naval exercise in the Yellow Sea, but instead I was stuck with a Henry Kissinger op-ed in the Washington Post. [1] Here it is, in Dr K's own words:

The Arab Spring is widely presented as a regional, youth-led revolution on behalf of liberal democratic principles. Yet Libya is not ruled by such forces; it hardly continues as a state. Neither is Egypt, whose electoral majority (possibly permanent) is overwhelmingly Islamist. Nor do democrats seem to predominate in the Syrian opposition.

The Arab League consensus on Syria is not shaped by countries previously distinguished by the practice or advocacy of democracy. Rather, it largely reflects the millennium-old conflict between Shi'ite and Sunni and an attempt to reclaim Sunni dominance from a Shi'ite minority. It is also precisely why so many minority groups, such as Druzes, Kurds and Christians, are uneasy about regime change in Syria.

Well, China scholar Dr K at least got this one right (and in total agreement with Maliki, no less). A full-fledged mercenary army paid for by autocrat Arabs to overthrow an Arab government is pure and simple regime change - US rhetoric about "democracy" and "freedom" notwithstanding. It's all about classic, imperial divide and rule, profiting from pitting Sunnis against Shi'ites.

And then my divine roasted duck revealed to me that realpolitik stalwart Dr K is not getting much traction in Washington these days.
 

damm1t

SENIOR MEMBER
Sep 22, 2010
3,895
-2
7,890
Country
Turkey
Location
Turkey
When muslims stop listening Sheikhs, Mullahs, Imams, they will reach greater enlightenment...

It depends how you analyze and see Islam, real Sheiks and Imams ( Sheikh term corrupted nowadays ) worked hard to regroup people on the days we fought "Kurtuluş Savaşı". They helped people to keep their beliefs higher, because of this we have war heroes like Seyid Onbaşı who could able to carry a 250 kg cannon ball and many others. On those days beliefs was hope and the power source for people. You must thankful for that.

But on the other hand, some people called "Sheiks" use people for their own desires and agendas and i think you talking about these people and some of them were against Ataturk himself. If we put them in same basket we would disrespect real Sheiks' memories.
Regards
 

Mahmoud_EGY

SENIOR MEMBER
Feb 22, 2012
2,546
1
2,904
Country
Egypt
Location
Egypt
When muslims stop listening Sheikhs, Mullahs, Imams, they will reach greater enlightenment...
not all of them there are sheiks who give great opinion like el azhar in cairo i always respect them and listen to what they say not some wahabi who say whatever their king tell them too
 

DV RULES

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 13, 2010
4,080
-2
2,361
Country
Pakistan
Location
Russian Federation
People ever show their stupidity with narrow minded thinking, they don't see peace in current running system but follow death from democracy. So get it.

Syrian people shouldn't follow foreign supported opposition leaders and liberals.
 

BordoEnes

SENIOR MEMBER
Apr 29, 2011
3,718
0
5,060
Country
Turkey
Location
Netherlands
Mate why do you listen to Fox news??

Oooh so your going to claim all those live recorded massacres are mad up to? Why dont you guys snap out of the mentality of everything what the West says or do is a lie or is bad. This has nothing to do with FOX news, This is something where the People of the Country wants freedom and rights and an Regime that is upressing them and massacring to only keep power for no purpose. Wake up already...
 

lem34

FULL MEMBER

New Recruit

Jun 3, 2011
4
0
17,862
Oooh so your going to claim all those live recorded massacres are mad up to? Why dont you guys snap out of the mentality of everything what the West says or do is a lie or is bad. This has nothing to do with FOX news, This is something where the People of the Country wants freedom and rights and an Regime that is upressing them and massacring to only keep power for no purpose. Wake up already...

Please answer this and we will discuss

I have put the post below on a number of threads and on no occasion has anyone rebutted anything I have stated and as far as I am concerned it stands:

I have heard the argument about human rights and killings going on in Syria but quite frankly it is very difficult in the fog of civil war or any war to actually get to the truth of the matter.

Let me tell you why I would be more than reluctant to support anyone in Syria

If it is a true revolution and even a significant minority wish to come out on the streets a country is ungovernable. Lets take the example of Pakistan. Our population is reputed to be 180 million people. If just 20% of the people decide that they want to come out on the streets that would be be 36 million. We have one of the largest standing armies in the world, we have our blessed ISI we have nukes. Even with these forces and nukes what could our army do??? Use nukes on our own people?? That would be the end. You will note it does not even require a majority to come on the streets. In practical terms the overwhelming number of people want to have security, a roof on their head and food on the table and could not give a monkey's who runs the country.

Now lets take the example of Libya-The rebels or whatever you want to call them could barely get out of Benghazi even though they were being funded and armed by third parties from outside the country. I am off the firm opinion in hindsight that Gaddaffi was less than wise because I think it is likely he would have done relatively well in any election and he should have attempted to legitamise his rule.

Had it not been for Nato's role in my opinion it is doubtful that the rebels could have succeeded.

Even after intervention we have a very unstable Libya wwith west stealing oil

Now lets look at UK and US in recent months we have had riots and civil disobedience. These disturbances have been dismissed as the actions of criminals and undesirables. If a foreign power was to lets say start supplying weapons and moral support these so called criminals and undesirables what could or would happen??

One mans rebel is another man's criminal and undesirable.

Who decides what the majority in a country wants in Syria?? Who decides that Assad is a dictator and must be removed whilst at the same time ignoring what is happening in Bahrain?? Who decides when to support dissident voices in a country. I mean every country has voices that don't agree with their government.

I could go on but you might get bored but you get the picture I hope.

The best we can do is pray for and hope is that the Syrian people themselves decide with as little bloodshed as possible a conclusion to the unrest.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom