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[OFFICIAL 1st January] CHINA DEFENCE LAW CHANGES PAVE THE WAY FOR GREATER GLOBAL MILITARY INFLUENCE !

Daniel808

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Christian Le Miere
How China’s defence law changes pave the way for greater global military influence
  • By providing legal support for future overseas adventurism, the law underlines Beijing’s intent to be a more activist military power and expands the reasons it might project its power abroad – a change that could shake up global politics

Illustration: Craig Stephens

Illustration: Craig Stephens

Just as much of the world celebrated the dawning of 2021 and bade good riddance to the much-maligned 2020, China quietly updated key legislation that could change world events.
On January 1, an amended National Defence Law came into effect after having been approved by the National People’s Congress Standing Committee. The seemingly technical, legalistic change would normally be unremarkable, but the amendments that were included could have profound effects on China’s legal standing and willingness to deploy its military overseas.

By providing legal support for China’s future overseas adventurism, the law both underlines Beijing’s intent to be a more activist military power and expands the reasons it might project its power overseas. As such, the little-reported amended law might be the most significant event in global politics for years. Some amendments continue the themes in domestic politics seen in recent years.


For the latter, the new law shifts the balance of responsibility for certain actions from the State Council – currently headed by Premier Li Keqiang, to the Central Military Commission, with Xi as its chair. This commission is now the lead agency in organising and implementing national defence mobilisation.


Of course, there has been little doubt that it is the party organs, and the general secretary in particular, that make decisions over military deployments, mobilisation and utilisation. Nevertheless, these amendments now add de jure confirmation of the minimal role played by the state.

More significant in the new law is the change to “military activities carried out by the state”. Previously, the activities the law applied to were largely a broad description of effectively protecting the homeland, including to “guard and resist aggression” and “safeguard the sovereignty, unification, territorial integrity and security of our country”.


Now, with the addition of just three words, this description has expanded to incorporate far more expansive activities.

One of these words is “disruption”, a vague term that could include anything from protests in Hong Kong, Tibet or Xinjiang to unrest over socio economic conditions. Of even greater international import, though, was the inclusion of the phrase defending “Overseas development interests”. This phrase suggests China now considers all of its investments and economic activity, domestic and overseas, to be worthy of protection by military force.


This is a substantial legal change and reflects long-term trends in China’s military capabilities and defence posture. From the creation of the modern state in 1949, Beijing was primarily worried about protection of the country’s territory and unity from foreign powers.

Its largest military engagements were to protect the country’s borders, such as in clashes with India and the Soviet Union in 1962 and 1969; its claim to territorial sovereignty with clashes against Vietnam in the South China Sea in 1974 and 1988; or to support foreign allies in the Korean war from 1951 and the Sino-Vietnamese War in 1979.


Now, the new defence law theoretically enables China to deploy overseas in support of its economic interests. Given the country’s stellar growth during the past four decades and substantial increase in overseas investments as part of its “go out” policy since the turn of the century, these interests are varied and global.

It is easy to imagine, for instance, Chinese troops being deployed to Pakistan to protect its Belt and Road Initiative investments as part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor from attack by Baloch separatists or Indian Aggression, or Chinese vessels escorting ships in the Persian Gulf and Strategic Strait as regional tensions rise. The People’s Liberation Army could be deployed to a South Pacific island or African state that has descended into ungoverned unrest to secure mining interests and Chinese citizens.


https://www.scmp.com/comment/opinio...-law-changes-pave-way-greater-global-military









China’s military takes charge of war powers with new defence law
Minnie Chan
31 December 2020




China has expanded the power of its Central Military Commission (CMC) – headed by President Xi Jinping – to mobilise military and civilian resources in defence of the national interest, both at home and abroad.

Revisions to the National Defence Law, effective from January 1, weaken the role of the State Council – China’s cabinet – in formulating military policy, handing decision-making powers to the CMC.
For the first time, “disruption” and protection of “development interests” have been added to the legislation as grounds for the mobilisation and deployment of troops and reserve forces.


The legislation also specifically stresses the need to build a nationwide coordination mechanism for the mobilisation of state-owned and private enterprises to take part in research into new defence technologies covering conventional weapons, as well as the non-traditional domains of cybersecurity, space and electromagnetics.

Military and political analysts said the amendments aimed to strengthen the country’s military leadership under Xi, providing it with the legal grounds to respond to the challenges of accelerating confrontations between China and the US.

Deng Yuwen, a former deputy editor of the Communist Party publication Study Times, said the amendments aimed to legalise and formally apply the “special” nature of China’s political and defence system when dealing with situations that could harm the regime at home and abroad.

“China’s political nature is very different from many countries … it’s not surprising for Beijing to enhance the leadership of the CMC when the PLA is going out to defend China’s national interests across the world,” said Deng, who is now an independent political commentator in the US.


China’s success at controlling the Covid-19 pandemic has been seen by Beijing as an endorsement of the Communist Party’s authoritarian rule, particularly as many Western countries are still struggling with rising numbers of infections.

Chen Daoyin, an independent political commentator and former professor at the Shanghai University of Political Science and Law, said the changes showed the regime had gained the confidence to legitimise its long-standing principle that “the party commands the gun” and stamp its “absolute leadership over armed and reserved forces”.

“The move to include ‘Overseas development interests’ as a reason for armed mobilisation and war in the law would provide legal grounds for the country to launch war in the legitimate name of defending national development interests, in domestic and abroad” Chen said.

Zeng Zhiping, a military law expert at Soochow University, said one of the big changes of the law was the downgrading of the State Council’s role in formulating the principles of China’s national defence, and the right to direct and administer the mobilisation of its armed forces.

“The CMC is now formally in charge of making national defence policy and principles, while the State Council becomes a mere implementing agency to provide support to the military,” said Zeng, who is also a retired PLA lieutenant colonel.


“It’s a big contrast when compared with developed countries like Israel, Germany and France, which prefer to put their armed forces under civilian leadership. Even in the US, the civilian-led defence ministry plays a more important role than their military top brass, the Joint Chiefs of Staff.”


Chi said the ultimate goal of the amended defence law could be seen as Beijing’s latest response to the US policy of comprehensive strategic containment of a rising China.

“The Chinese Communist Party now has strong crisis awareness as it faces various new security challenges, pushing the PLA to come up with a new defence policy soon after completing the establishment of top-down commanding and coordinating systems under Xi’s leadership,” Chi said.

“The law revision is also a symbolic battle call by the party to warn all Chinese people to be combat-ready for a nationwide defence mobilisation, which the party has never done since [it came to power] in 1949.”

The amendments were passed by the National People’s Congress on December 26, after two years of deliberation. Three articles were removed, more than 50 were amended, while there were six additions. In a media conference earlier in December, a spokesperson for the CMC’s legislative affairs bureau said the changes gave the PLA a clear direction in its modernisation and development goals.

https://malaysia.news.yahoo.com/chi...GzaBF0NDLYw8FaP1O_sFY0k-vj2E-0z-f78-MRo2LwDQv
 
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Daniel808

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So with this New Defence Law, China will send their Military Expeditionary Forces if :

1. Some hostile country trying to block Persian Gulf, Indian Ocean, Malacca Strait or other strategically strait for Chinese Commercial Ships.
2. Some Rebels, terrorist or hostile country trying to threaten Chinese Overseas Mine, Investment, Facility & Factory.
3. Some terrorist or rogue country trying to threaten the Safety of Overseas Chinese.



And another important point to note also : "Now China Military itself Takes Charge of War Power"
Unlike other countries, that Civilian in charge of Declaring War. In China with this New Defence Law, their Military (under Central Military Commission-CMC) itself in charges of Military Mobilization & Declaring War to other countries that threatened Chinese "Overseas development interests"


And like we all know, the Military people are more Patriotic & nationalist than Civilian ones and also more eager to Sent Expeditionary Forces to Protect Chinese Overseas Interests.

So no more like when Chinese sent Expeditionary Troops to intervene in Korea (1950), when Mao Zedong and Peng Dehuai (Military) need to convince Politburo (Civilian) first, the needs to sent Chinese Expeditionary Forces to Korea and Declaring War with The winner of WW2 (USA)

An interesting time ahead 😉








This is the Board of CMC-China Central Military Commission (China Military)

Chairman :

Xi Jinping as Commander-in-chief

Vice Chairman :
General Xu Qiliang (from China's Air Force)
General Zhang Youxia (from China's Army)

Members :
Admiral Miao Hua (From China's Navy)
General Wei Fenghe (from Ministry of National Defence)
General Zhang Shengmin (From China's Rocket Forces)
General Li Zuocheng as Chief of Joint Operation (from China's Army)

2021.jpeg
 
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Daniel808

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China to slap countermeasures on unjustified extraterritorial application of foreign laws amid US bullying sanctions
By Global Times Published: Jan 09, 2021 10:21 AM


The Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) Photo: VCG

China's commerce ministry issued its first order of the year on Saturday, unveiling rules that include the adoption of necessary countermeasures against unjustified extraterritorial application of foreign legislation, in a fresh move to carry the country's legal self-defense against notably the US bullying of China.

Having been ratified by the State Council, the rules have come into force and are intended to counteract the impact of unjustified extraterritorial application of foreign laws and measures on China, safeguard national sovereignty, security, development interests, and protect the legitimate rights of Chinese citizens, legal persons or other organizations, according to the order signed by Wang Wentao, China's commerce minister.

"Where the working mechanism, upon assessment, confirms that there exists unjustified extra-territorial application of foreign legislation and other measures, it may decide that the competent department of commerce of the State Council shall issue a prohibition order to the effect that, the relevant foreign legislation and other measures are not accepted, executed, or observed," read the new rules.


The prohibition order may be suspended or withdrawn based on actual circumstances.

The measures stipulate that Chinese people can institute legal proceedings in local courts, if a judgment or ruling based on foreign legislation that fall under the preview of the prohibition order subjects them to losses, and they can request the parties benefiting from the said ruling or verdict to compensate for the losses.

Relevant government departments may provide necessary support based on specific circumstances to citizens, legal persons and organizations if they suffer significant losses resulting from non-compliance with relevant foreign laws and regulations, and the Chinese government may take necessary countermeasures against the inappropriate extraterritorial law application based on actual conditions and needs.

The new rules came on the heels of a raft of bullying acts by the Trump administration targeting Chinese people and businesses.

The Trump administration has added dozens of senior Chinese officials to its Hong Kong sanction list and put an increasing number of Chinese firms on a trade blacklist.


A man walks near the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on August 31, 2020 at Wall Street in New York City.Photo: CFP

In a sign that the US is spiraling deeper into lawless confusion, the New York Stock Exchange has over recent days twice reversed a plan to delist three Chinese telecom giants in compliance with a Trump executive order that bans US investors from transacting publicly traded securities of firms allegedly linked to Chinese military starting January 11.

In a question-and-answer posted on the Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM)'s website, Han Liyu, a professor at the Law School of Renmin University of China, said that the new measures demonstrate China's firm stance on objecting to inappropriate application of foreign laws or foreign extraterritorial measures, safeguard companys' channels to seek protection of their legitimate rights, and show China's responsibility in defending the international economic and trade order.

Han also stressed that the new measures will not affect China's implementation of international treaties, as foreign agreements with China will not be applicable to the new measures if they involve application of foreign laws or foreign extraterritorial measures.

Han said that the government will give guidance and services to companies to help them cope with relevant foreign laws and foreign extraterritorial measures, and companies can apply to courts for judicial remedy if they suffer losses because of those laws and measures.

Han nevertheless stressed that companies must also "take some necessary responsibilities, such as reporting the situation [to the government], otherwise they will also face penalties."

According to Han, the MOFCOM order provides a legal basis for blocking or restricting improper laws or measures that interfere with normal economic and trade activities of Chinese companies in a third country. The new measures have learned from legislation experience and institutional design from other countries, but have also taken into consideration China's practical needs in coping with improper foreign laws and measures.


Photo:VCG

Prior to the Saturday announcement, China unveiled new rules for reviewing foreign investment on security grounds on December 20 in a major move to align with global practice in regulating foreign investment in the military, key energy and information technology sectors, and financial services.

The National Development and Reform Commission and MOFCOM jointly released the investment rules, scheduled to come into force in 30 days. The 23-clause new rules are based on the Foreign Investment Law and the National Security Law.

Foreign investment in the military sector, among other national defense and security related areas, and investments involving foreigners near military facilities would be subject to the new rules.

https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202101/1212274.shtml

Having been ratified by the State Council, the rules have come into force and are intended to counteract the impact of unjustified extraterritorial application of foreign laws and measures on China, safeguard national sovereignty, security, development interests, and protect the legitimate rights of Chinese citizens, legal persons or other organizations, according to the order signed by Wang Wentao, China's commerce minister.

"Where the working mechanism, upon assessment, confirms that there exists unjustified extra-territorial application of foreign legislation and other measures, it may decide that the competent department of commerce of the State Council shall issue a prohibition order to the effect that, the relevant foreign legislation and other measures are not accepted, executed, or observed," read the new rules.
In the same time, China's also issued a New Law, to slap necessary countermeasures against unjustified extraterritorial application of Chinese foreign legislation or Overseas Chinese in foreign country.

In this case, if :
1. A hostile country issued discrimination law to Chinese Companies or Overseas Chinese, China have right to Slap Countermeasures against that country company, government or citizens operating in China & Overseas.
2. A south Pacific nation unjustified nationalize Chinese mine owned by Chinese company in their country, it will see as a threat to Chinese Development interests, company & citizens. China have rights to slap countermeasure & intervene to teach that rogue country
 
Last edited:

Daniel808

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Christian Le Miere
How China’s defence law changes pave the way for greater global military influence
  • By providing legal support for future overseas adventurism, the law underlines Beijing’s intent to be a more activist military power and expands the reasons it might project its power abroad – a change that could shake up global politics

Illustration: Craig Stephens

Illustration: Craig Stephens

Just as much of the world celebrated the dawning of 2021 and bade good riddance to the much-maligned 2020, China quietly updated key legislation that could change world events.
On January 1, an amended National Defence Law came into effect after having been approved by the National People’s Congress Standing Committee. The seemingly technical, legalistic change would normally be unremarkable, but the amendments that were included could have profound effects on China’s legal standing and willingness to deploy its military overseas.

By providing legal support for China’s future overseas adventurism, the law both underlines Beijing’s intent to be a more activist military power and expands the reasons it might project its power overseas. As such, the little-reported amended law might be the most significant event in global politics for years. Some amendments continue the themes in domestic politics seen in recent years.


For the latter, the new law shifts the balance of responsibility for certain actions from the State Council – currently headed by Premier Li Keqiang, to the Central Military Commission, with Xi as its chair. This commission is now the lead agency in organising and implementing national defence mobilisation.


Of course, there has been little doubt that it is the party organs, and the general secretary in particular, that make decisions over military deployments, mobilisation and utilisation. Nevertheless, these amendments now add de jure confirmation of the minimal role played by the state.

More significant in the new law is the change to “military activities carried out by the state”. Previously, the activities the law applied to were largely a broad description of effectively protecting the homeland, including to “guard and resist aggression” and “safeguard the sovereignty, unification, territorial integrity and security of our country”.


Now, with the addition of just three words, this description has expanded to incorporate far more expansive activities.

One of these words is “disruption”, a vague term that could include anything from protests in Hong Kong, Tibet or Xinjiang to unrest over socio economic conditions. Of even greater international import, though, was the inclusion of the phrase defending “Overseas development interests”. This phrase suggests China now considers all of its investments and economic activity, domestic and overseas, to be worthy of protection by military force.


This is a substantial legal change and reflects long-term trends in China’s military capabilities and defence posture. From the creation of the modern state in 1949, Beijing was primarily worried about protection of the country’s territory and unity from foreign powers.

Its largest military engagements were to protect the country’s borders, such as in clashes with India and the Soviet Union in 1962 and 1969; its claim to territorial sovereignty with clashes against Vietnam in the South China Sea in 1974 and 1988; or to support foreign allies in the Korean war from 1951 and the Sino-Vietnamese War in 1979.


Now, the new defence law theoretically enables China to deploy overseas in support of its economic interests. Given the country’s stellar growth during the past four decades and substantial increase in overseas investments as part of its “go out” policy since the turn of the century, these interests are varied and global.

It is easy to imagine, for instance, Chinese troops being deployed to Pakistan to protect its Belt and Road Initiative investments as part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor from attack by Baloch separatists or Indian Aggression, or Chinese vessels escorting ships in the Persian Gulf and Strategic Strait as regional tensions rise. The People’s Liberation Army could be deployed to a South Pacific island or African state that has descended into ungoverned unrest to secure mining interests and Chinese citizens.


https://www.scmp.com/comment/opinio...-law-changes-pave-way-greater-global-military









China’s military takes charge of war powers with new defence law
Minnie Chan
31 December 2020




China has expanded the power of its Central Military Commission (CMC) – headed by President Xi Jinping – to mobilise military and civilian resources in defence of the national interest, both at home and abroad.

Revisions to the National Defence Law, effective from January 1, weaken the role of the State Council – China’s cabinet – in formulating military policy, handing decision-making powers to the CMC.
For the first time, “disruption” and protection of “development interests” have been added to the legislation as grounds for the mobilisation and deployment of troops and reserve forces.


The legislation also specifically stresses the need to build a nationwide coordination mechanism for the mobilisation of state-owned and private enterprises to take part in research into new defence technologies covering conventional weapons, as well as the non-traditional domains of cybersecurity, space and electromagnetics.

Military and political analysts said the amendments aimed to strengthen the country’s military leadership under Xi, providing it with the legal grounds to respond to the challenges of accelerating confrontations between China and the US.

Deng Yuwen, a former deputy editor of the Communist Party publication Study Times, said the amendments aimed to legalise and formally apply the “special” nature of China’s political and defence system when dealing with situations that could harm the regime at home and abroad.

“China’s political nature is very different from many countries … it’s not surprising for Beijing to enhance the leadership of the CMC when the PLA is going out to defend China’s national interests across the world,” said Deng, who is now an independent political commentator in the US.


China’s success at controlling the Covid-19 pandemic has been seen by Beijing as an endorsement of the Communist Party’s authoritarian rule, particularly as many Western countries are still struggling with rising numbers of infections.

Chen Daoyin, an independent political commentator and former professor at the Shanghai University of Political Science and Law, said the changes showed the regime had gained the confidence to legitimise its long-standing principle that “the party commands the gun” and stamp its “absolute leadership over armed and reserved forces”.

“The move to include ‘Overseas development interests’ as a reason for armed mobilisation and war in the law would provide legal grounds for the country to launch war in the legitimate name of defending national development interests, in domestic and abroad” Chen said.

Zeng Zhiping, a military law expert at Soochow University, said one of the big changes of the law was the downgrading of the State Council’s role in formulating the principles of China’s national defence, and the right to direct and administer the mobilisation of its armed forces.

“The CMC is now formally in charge of making national defence policy and principles, while the State Council becomes a mere implementing agency to provide support to the military,” said Zeng, who is also a retired PLA lieutenant colonel.


“It’s a big contrast when compared with developed countries like Israel, Germany and France, which prefer to put their armed forces under civilian leadership. Even in the US, the civilian-led defence ministry plays a more important role than their military top brass, the Joint Chiefs of Staff.”


Chi said the ultimate goal of the amended defence law could be seen as Beijing’s latest response to the US policy of comprehensive strategic containment of a rising China.

“The Chinese Communist Party now has strong crisis awareness as it faces various new security challenges, pushing the PLA to come up with a new defence policy soon after completing the establishment of top-down commanding and coordinating systems under Xi’s leadership,” Chi said.

“The law revision is also a symbolic battle call by the party to warn all Chinese people to be combat-ready for a nationwide defence mobilisation, which the party has never done since [it came to power] in 1949.”

The amendments were passed by the National People’s Congress on December 26, after two years of deliberation. Three articles were removed, more than 50 were amended, while there were six additions. In a media conference earlier in December, a spokesperson for the CMC’s legislative affairs bureau said the changes gave the PLA a clear direction in its modernisation and development goals.

https://malaysia.news.yahoo.com/chi...GzaBF0NDLYw8FaP1O_sFY0k-vj2E-0z-f78-MRo2LwDQv

China mulls defence law amendments amid profound changes in the world
By Liu Xuanzun and Liu Caiyu Source: Global Times
Published: 2020/10/22 21:04:28 Last Updated: 2020/10/22 22:16:52


Threats to development interests added as reasons for defense mobilization


Making their debut in the general public for the first time, DF-17 missiles join the National Day parade held in Beijing on October 1, 2019. Photo: Fan Lingzhi/GT

China is mulling amendments to its Law on National Defence amid profound changes in the world over the past two decades by adding key formulations, including threats to the country's development interests, as reasons for defense mobilization, and involvement in global security governance.

With China's development interests growing alongside the country's peaceful development, it has more and more overseas interests, including strategic transport lanes and Chinese citizens overseas and investments, which could be vulnerable to terrorism, regional instabilities as well as hostile attacks and lockdowns, with the proposed law amendments aiming to work in tandem with military reform to ensure China's peaceful development and growing interests around the world have the backing of defense forces when needed, analysts said on Thursday.

The amendment draft to the Law on National Defence was released on the website of the National People's Congress (NPC) on Wednesday, soliciting opinions from the general public from Wednesday to November 19, after the draft was deliberated by the NPC Standing Committee at a plenary session in Beijing. General Wei Fenghe, a Central Military Commission (CMC) member, a State Councilor and the Minister of National Defense, explained the draft in detail, media reported on Wednesday.

Wei said that the current Law on National Defense, which came into effect in 1997, cannot fully adapt to new missions and the requirements for the development of national defense and the Chinese military; therefore, it needs to be amended.

The world's strategic situation has undergone profound changes over the last 20 years, as the world has seen international strategic competition on the rise, continually increasing global and regional security issues, non-stop armed conflicts and regional warfare, and increasingly obvious instability and uncertainty in international security, Wei said.

Wei also noted that China is in a key period of strategic opportunity for development and is facing even more complicated security threats and challenges.

The draft amendment states that when China's sovereignty, unity, territorial integrity, and security and development interests are under threat, the country can conduct nationwide or local defense mobilization. The "development interests" part is a new addition to the current law.

China's development interests mainly involve two aspects; that is, domestic and overseas, Xu Guangyu, a senior adviser to the China Arms Control and Disarmament Association, told the Global Times on Thursday.

Domestic development interests include the likes of economical operation, and if these normal activities are contained or sabotaged by external forces by, for example, severe trade blockades, it should be viewed as a serious threat, Xu said.

Overseas development interests include China's overseas economic activities including investments and cooperation, such as China-proposed Belt and Road Initiative. China will need to make countermeasures if these operations are intentionally blocked by regional warfare or lockdowns, Xu said.

China's domestic development relies on overseas transport lanes for trade and energy supplies, and China now has a large number of investments overseas, Song Zhongping, a Chinese military expert and TV commentator, told the Global Times on Thursday.


Two Su-35 fighter jets and a H-6K bomber fly in formation on May 11, 2018. The People's Liberation Army (PLA) air force conducted patrol training over China's island of Taiwan on Friday. Su-35 fighter jets flew over the Bashi Channel in formation with the H-6Ks for the first time, which marks a new breakthrough in island patrol patterns, said Shen Jinke, spokesperson for the PLA air force. Photo: China Military

The draft amendment's addition of "development interest" threats stresses the protection of the overseas transport lanes and overseas Chinese investments that could be vulnerable to terrorism, regional instabilities and hostile attacks and lockdowns, the experts said.

Under the current situation, in which the US is eyeing to rally its so-called allies to contain China's development in many ways, including militarily, having a legal basis to counter threats has significant meaning, analysts said.

Xu said that China's defense mobilization will be on a reciprocal basis. Only when the opponent adopts war-like measures will China counter with its own military measures.

In another proposed addition to the law, the draft amendment said that China could use its armed forces to protect overseas Chinese citizens, organizations, units and facilities, thus safeguarding China's overseas interests, and participating in activities including UN peacekeeping missions, international rescues, maritime escorts, joint exercises and anti-terrorism operations following the basic rules of international relations based on the principles of the UN Charter.

If China's overseas interests are seriously threatened, China would be able to use its military capabilities to effectively safeguard its overseas citizens and organizations so the country's interests are not harmed, Song said.

China's military reform, latest national defense strategy, steadily increasing defense budget and the law amendment work in tandem to achieve this goal, analysts said.

China is eyeing to build a "deep-blue-water" navy, with observers naming aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships and large destroyers as key items in protecting China's overseas interests.

A third and much larger aircraft carrier is under construction in Shanghai, two Type 075 amphibious assault ships have been launched and a third under construction, and eight Type 055 10,000 ton-class destroyers have either entered naval service, preparing for commissioning, or undergoing sea trials, reports said. Another type of more powerful amphibious assault ship, the Type 076, which could feature electromagnetic catapults to launch fixed-wing stealth armed reconnaissance drones, is also under development, foreign reports said.

The draft amendment also states that China will participate in global security governance, join multilateral security talks and push for and set up a set of international rules that is widely accepted, fair and reasonable.

Xu said that such kind of rules are needed as China's economic capacity and global influence grows while having so many connections to other parts of the world at the same time. China also represents many other developing countries that have their own interests to safeguard themselves but do not have loud enough voices to speak for themselves.

Under the amended law, China could send more troops overseas to participate in the likes of UN peacekeeping, anti-piracy, and anti-terrorism operations, Xu predicted.


Vessels in the Taiwan Straits, July 20, 2017. /CGTN Photo

New battlefields


Besides border, maritime and air defense, the draft amendment also states that China should take necessary measures to safeguard activities, assets and other interests in other key security fields including outer space, electromagnetic space and networks.

Beijing-based military expert Li Jie told the Global Times on Thursday that the US and its so-called allies have been attempting to contain China not only in traditional defense approaches, but also new (and less visible) fields such as space and networks.

These fields could become "new battlefields" where no bullet is fired, but gaining superiority in them will hold significant advantages in traditional defense fields by winning the war of information, analysts said.

The draft revisions also aim to make Chinese military service a profession revered by the whole of society, which analysts said will guarantee that they better accomplish missions in emergencies, war and occasions in which national sovereignty, security and development interests are being harmed.


https://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1204388.shtml
 

Daniel808

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With the Launching of Type 003 Aircraft Carrier (CVBG-18) & third Type 075 LHD This year, 2021.
And Started Construction of Type 004 Aircraft Carrier (CVBG-19) & fourth Type 075 LHD.
In the very near future, China will have 8 Aircraft Carrier & Assault Carrier Ready for Combat

Screenshot_20210122-130730_Chrome.jpg
https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202101/1213074.shtml


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2021 3.jpg
2021 4.jpg
2021 5.png

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With that 8 Flat top in Chinese Navy Service (4 Aircraft Carrier & 4 Assault Carrier) :
It will make China Navy the Biggest Air Power & Amphibious Forces in entire South China Sea and Hindian Ocean.

China's Navy PLANS Liaoning (CVBG-16) : 26 J-15/J-35, Total 44 with Rotary Wing.
China's Navy PLANS Shandong (CVBG-17) : 36 J-15/J-35, Total 48 with Rotary WIng.
China's Navy CVBG-18 : 48 J-15/J-35, Total 86-90 with Rotary Wing
China's Navy CVBG-19 : 48 J-15/J-35, Total 86-90 with Rotary Wing

That's bring for : 26+36+48 = 110 Combat Aircraft + 48 (CVBG-19) = 158-160 Combat Aircraft.
With that such Powerful Naval Air Power, China's Navy can easily Take down any Enemy air force in South China Sea & Hindian Ocean
 
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Daniel808

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China's Navy PLANS Liaoning (CVBG-16) : 26 J-15/J-35, Total 44 with Rotary Wing.
China's Navy PLANS Shandong (CVBG-17) : 36 J-15/J-35, Total 48 with Rotary WIng.
China's Navy CVBG-18 : 48 J-15/J-35, Total 86-90 with Rotary Wing
China's Navy CVBG-19 : 48 J-15/J-35, Total 86-90 with Rotary Wing

That's bring for : 26+36+48 = (110) Combat Aircraft + 48 from CVBG-19 = (158-160) Combat Aircraft.

For Comparison :

Phillipines Air Force : 12 FA-50 Light fighter (12)
Vietnam Air Force : 11 Su-27, 35 Su-30 (46)
Brunei Air Force : 0 Combat Aircraft (0)
Malaysia Air Force : 18 Su-30, 8 FA-18 (26)
Indonesia Air Force : 33 F-16, 5 Su-27, 11 Su-30 (49)
Indian Naval Air Force : 36 Mig-29 (36)
Australia Air Force : 30 F-35, 24 FA-18F, 69 FA-18AB (123)
New Zealand Air Force : 0 Combat Aircraft (0)


Anyway this is just only for comparison need, because China have very Good relationship with all those countries. Of course China and all of those countries always pursue peaceful co-existence & prosper together.
Rise Century for all Asian people.

Except for short-minded indian 😉
 
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TaiShang

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This is a natural evolution. Development is Indeed a question of national security. Any threat development interests is a threat to the overall national security. And such threat may require high-politics instruments (both economic and military) to be utilized.

This is imperative for China's trade partners and is a public goods. Given that China is the largest trading nation and largest importer of key commodities, protecting China's development interests equals to protecting global interests, which means international public goods.
 

Viet

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So with this New Defence Law, China will send their Military Expeditionary Forces if :

1. Some hostile country trying to block Persian Gulf, Indian Ocean, Malacca Strait or other strategically strait for Chinese Commercial Ships.
2. Some Rebels, terrorist or hostile country trying to threaten Chinese Overseas Mine, Investment, Facility & Factory.
3. Some terrorist or rogue country trying to threaten the Safety of Overseas Chinese.



And another important point to note also : "Now China Military itself Takes Charge of War Power"
Unlike other countries, that Civilian in charges of Declaring War. In China with this New Defence Law, their Military (under Central Military Commission-CMC) itself in charges of Military Mobilization & Declaring War to other countries that that threatened Chinese "Overseas development interests"


And like we now, the Military people are more Patriot & nationalist than Civilian ones and also more eager to Sent Expeditionary Forces to Protect Chinese Overseas Interests.

So no more like when Chinese sent Expeditionary Troops to intervene in Korea (1950), when Mao Zedong and Peng Dehuai (Military) need to convince Politburo (Civilian) first, the needs to sent Chinese Expeditionary Forces to Korea and Declaring War with The winner of WW2 (USA)

An interesting time ahead 😉








This is the Board of CMC-China Central Military Commission (China Military)

Chairman :

Xi Jinping as Commander-in-chief

Vice Chairman :
General Xu Qiliang (from China's Air Force)
General Zhang Youxia (from China's Army)

Members :
Admiral Miao Hua (From China's Navy)
General Wei Fenghe (from Ministry of National Defence)
General Zhang Shengmin (From China's Rocket Forces)
General Li Zuocheng as Joint Chief of Operation (from China's Army)

View attachment 709271
Great move
Will the PLA launch amphibious assaults on Kuala Lumpur if the Malays harass chinese malay ethnics?
 

TaiShang

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Great move
Will the PLA launch amphibious assaults on Kuala Lumpur if the Malays harass chinese malay ethnics?
With China-ASEAN forming a single mega-region, and then Northeast Asia jumping in, there is no such likelihood. In any case, should it happens, China and ASEAN have lots of communication mechanisms at all levels.

But, I am sure ASEAN would not intervene if the fifth-column in South Vietnam tried to stage a coup and bring down the Communist government. ASEAN has strict non-intervention policy.

But, China would intervene at the invitation of the VCP.

Like you, I am only talking hypothetically.
 

Daniel808

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Great move
Will the PLA launch amphibious assaults on Kuala Lumpur if the Malays harass chinese malay ethnics?
Remembering me about the Malay Incident in 2015

When some Pro Government Malay Radicals threatening to raid Petaling Street Chinatown in KL (Like Glodok Area in Jakarta).

The day before the planned raid, The Chinese Ambassador Come to Petaling street and made a statement to Support Overseas Chinese Ethnic there and Condemn/Criticize Racism & Extremism in Malaysia.

Make Malaysia Govt at that time panic, and forced their own supporters to cancel the raid night before the raid planned.

The Malay Govt than called the Ambassador. But China Govt stand with Overseas Chinese Ethnic in Malaysia, and Supporting the incident. Even condemn and remind Malaysia Govt to maintain the national unity & ethnic harmony :D

https://mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKCN0RS0V520150928


Anyway, NO. Chinese people as Descendants of The Dragon is very Peaceful loving 😉 You can sleep well now, my friend @Viet
With China-ASEAN forming a single mega-region, and then Northeast Asia jumping in, there is no such likelihood. In any case, should it happens, China and ASEAN have lots of communication mechanisms at all levels.

But, I am sure ASEAN would not intervene if the fifth-column in South Vietnam tried to stage a coup and bring down the Communist government. ASEAN has strict non-intervention policy.

But, China would intervene at the invitation of the VCP.

Like you, I am only talking hypothetically.
Of course, Chinese Expeditionary Forces will Intervene & Help Vietnam government from Barbaric colour revolution instigated by CIA.

Chinese will never let their viet little brother become The Next Syria or Libya.

Chinese don't want to see their little brother ruin their own life, and hundred of thousands of viet refugees flock to their Southern Border & Provinces.

Because it will harm Chinese "Overseas Development Interests"

😊
 
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shi12jun

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As China's economy continues to grow, more funds are invested in the development and expansion of military weapons. China will be stronger in ten years :china:
 

Daniel808

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As China's economy continues to grow, more funds are invested in the development and expansion of military weapons. China will be stronger in ten years :china:
Indeed my brother :tup: Time is siding with us, right now

In a mere 4 years (2025-2026), China Economy will overtake US. And then followed by Military.

An interesting time ahead for all of us 😉 @shi12jun Lucky we are born in this era
 

shi12jun

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Indeed my brother :tup: Time is siding with us, right now

In a mere 4 years (2025-2026), China Economy will overtake US. And then followed by Military.

An interesting time ahead for all of us 😉 @shi12jun Lucky we are born in this era
Yes brother, we can witness the rise of Chinese power. The Eastern Dragon takes off again
16c06ca2-0653-43b9-b87c-0e54c5778951.png
 

Viet

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With China-ASEAN forming a single mega-region, and then Northeast Asia jumping in, there is no such likelihood. In any case, should it happens, China and ASEAN have lots of communication mechanisms at all levels.

But, I am sure ASEAN would not intervene if the fifth-column in South Vietnam tried to stage a coup and bring down the Communist government. ASEAN has strict non-intervention policy.

But, China would intervene at the invitation of the VCP.

Like you, I am only talking hypothetically.
You dream. Why should Vcp invite a chinese invasion? It’s like committing suicide.
 

TaiShang

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You dream. Why should Vcp invite a chinese invasion? It’s like committing suicide.
If the US-backed Southern insurgents armed by the West attempted to topple the VCP government, CN would intervene. VCP would invite PLA, just as VN's war against US invasion in the past.
 

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