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Nuclear Pakistan - credit where it is due

M. Sarmad

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Which would be used to kill the political opponents of the father of jamhoriyat
That's mostly propaganda by Zia regime (Masood Mahmood was surely a 'wrong choice' though), but that's another debate. Let's not derail this thread.
 

Brass Knuckles

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That's mostly propaganda by Zia regime (Masood Mahmood was surely a 'wrong choice' though), but that's another debate. Let's not derail this thread.
So you are saying Bhutto didn't killed his opponents
Bhutto was the only dictator Pakistan ever had he ruled like a dictator
 
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ProudPak

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Why so offensive? I can google & I can read. But Google & Wikipedia are no places for research or to gain knowledge from. Talk about JStore and the likes of it. But that's beside the point. The point is whether you can prove congruency, causal mechanism and causal links between Bhutto's speech and actions and the fall of Dhaka? There is no one in Pakistan today making controversial statements against Balochs, yet we have Baloch insurgency. Congruence and causal explanations are very simple research methods. Since you are fond of Google, do a search on these methods and put whatever literature you have been reading to test to prove (or disprove) your argument. Bhutto at best was one of the last intervening phenomena and by no means the antecedent phenomenon in the creation of Bangladesh. In simple, he is "ONE" of the last straws that broke the camel's back. But his worth was exactly that of straw compared to the burden put on East Pakistan by the West Pakistani establishment.

Coming to the topic, Bhutto is the soul and sole mastermind of Pakistan's nuclear weapons programme. Had there been someone else in his place I don't see Pakistan with nukes then. He came up with the proposal in the 1960s and the establishment scoffed at him. Post-1979, that very same establishment appointed itself as the hero and saviour of the programme, which it definitely is, but credit is due where credit belongs.
I see u like waffling.
 

ghazi52

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A heroes welcome..
The team of Pakistani nuclear scientists who conducted nuclear tests on 28th of May 1998 coming back from test site and meeting the journalists..
Due to secrecy most of the scientists were not known to the press and nobody knew their names.


 

El Sidd

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Nuclear Pakistan - credit where it is due

Lt Gen Ghulam Mustafa (Retd)

May 28, 2019


The scale and magnitude of the success of Pakistan’s nuclear program can only be understood if it is placed in some kind of measurable context. Let me try doing that.

Read the book titled” Two Minutes Over Baghdad”; it’s a fascinating story about how Israeli Air Force destroyed Iraq’s nuclear Reactor “ Tammuz One” on 7 June 81 and with it Saddam Hussein’s ambitions of leading Iraq into leadership role of the Arab/ Muslim world. Destruction of this reactor was accompanied by murder of many of Iraq’s leading scientists and engineers effectively sealing any possibility of Iraq going at it again.

That’s how serious the world was then against any Muslim country becoming nuclear power.

More recently, Iran’s nuclear ambitions are one of the major reasons for pushing it back into sanctions yet again. And it is not easy for Iranians despite being major oil exporters. When push came to shove, even its strategic ally, India, took no time in deserting it. These sanctions are being enforced through brutal power with more to come because Americans didn’t have to make major naval and other redeployments focused around the Strait of Hormuz merely as show of force.

In this backdrop, it is pretty sobering to think that technologically primitive Pakistan, not as well-endowed financially as Iraq or Iran and also not as important for anyone as Israel is for America , went around everything and everyone to become a recognised nuclear power and a Muslim country too. If asked to express themselves frankly, only a handful of countries would like Pakistan’s nuclear capability. In fact quite a few would actually vote to take it back. Some wouldn’t mind destroying it physically if possible.

If ever documented, Pakistan’s journey from apparently innocuous KANUPP (Karachi Nuclear Power Plant) to KRL ( Khan Research Laboratory) onto Chagai Hills would pale the combined genius of John Le Carre, Robert Ludlum and Frederick Forsyth.

From Dr Usmani to Dr Qadeer and Dr Samar Mubarakmand, from Ayub Khan to Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, Ishaq khan, Ziaul Haq and Mian Nawaz Sharif, there’s a long list of scientists, engineers and leaders who rightly deserve to be credited for their contributions in developing Pakistan’s nuclear capability. It will be unfair not to recognised Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (ZAB) for the lions share in this regard. By his own admission, even the wiliest of foxes, Dr Henry Kissinger couldn’t help recognising his genius when he outwitted the good doctor twice. Once on Lahore Airport when Henry Kissinger wanted to discuss Pakistan’s nuclear program, ZAB told him politely that he couldn’t talk about it because of impending elections in Pakistan in 1977 and second time the Dr got hold of ZAB on Paris Airport where he was told that it was pointless to talk about it, this time because of impending elections in America. Only ZAB could do that to Henry Kissinger

ZAB also doesn’t get credit for one more critical decision that proved to be the game changer. He took this project out of routine bureaucratic channels and set up a special system involving only the most essential offices and persons. He put Army in charge with COAS coordinating all aspects of the program and reporting directly to the PM/ Chief Executive. Everything and everyone else kept changing but this constant, the Army, didn’t. It not only ensured much needed continuity, smooth and easy execution of the program removing all possible administrative and other hurdles but guarded it jealousy the way only army can. But for this crucial measure, who knows what would have happened given the uncertainties and lethargy that afflicts us as a nation.

Just one of the many incidents to make it clearer; Gen Abdul Waheed Kakar, on his first ever visit to USA was told that Americans are very keen to discuss this program. He response was sharp and clear, “No, Pakistan’s nuclear program is off limits”. As he landed in Washington and was being driven to his hotel, he was informed that Americans are adamant and will bring this subject up during negotiations. They were messing with wrong man. Gen Waheed Kakar ordered his staff there and then, “We are going back. Book our tickets back for Pakistan on the first available flight. I will never talk about something absolutely crucial for Pakistan’s security”. Americans had to concede to the will of this diminutive but rock solid COAS. Others preceding or following him didn’t waver either.

When we eulogise all others for their great contributions in giving us across the spectrum strategic deterrence, don’t forget this singular and crucial role played by our army. It will also be unfair if we don’t recognise the brave and courageous people of Pakistan without whose unflinching support we would be nowhere.
#ThankYouMohsinOfPakistan
#NuclearQadir
 

M. Sarmad

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Let's not forget to thank Mr. Samuel Martin Burke, one of the best career diplomats we ever had, who, as Pakistan’s High Commissioner to Canada (1959-61), signed the agreement for the peaceful uses of atomic energy which enabled Pakistan to purchase uranium from Canada. Before that, he was appointed in Washington when Pakistan had requested military assistance from the United States, and to earn American goodwill Burke and his English-born wife Louise undertook nationwide speaking tours... He successfully convinced USA and Canada of Pakistan’s need of nuclear reactors....

 
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MastanKhan

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Nuclear Pakistan - credit where it is due

Lt Gen Ghulam Mustafa (Retd)

May 28, 2019


The scale and magnitude of the success of Pakistan’s nuclear program can only be understood if it is placed in some kind of measurable context. Let me try doing that.

Read the book titled” Two Minutes Over Baghdad”; it’s a fascinating story about how Israeli Air Force destroyed Iraq’s nuclear Reactor “ Tammuz One” on 7 June 81 and with it Saddam Hussein’s ambitions of leading Iraq into leadership role of the Arab/ Muslim world. Destruction of this reactor was accompanied by murder of many of Iraq’s leading scientists and engineers effectively sealing any possibility of Iraq going at it again.

That’s how serious the world was then against any Muslim country becoming nuclear power.

More recently, Iran’s nuclear ambitions are one of the major reasons for pushing it back into sanctions yet again. And it is not easy for Iranians despite being major oil exporters. When push came to shove, even its strategic ally, India, took no time in deserting it. These sanctions are being enforced through brutal power with more to come because Americans didn’t have to make major naval and other redeployments focused around the Strait of Hormuz merely as show of force.

In this backdrop, it is pretty sobering to think that technologically primitive Pakistan, not as well-endowed financially as Iraq or Iran and also not as important for anyone as Israel is for America , went around everything and everyone to become a recognised nuclear power and a Muslim country too. If asked to express themselves frankly, only a handful of countries would like Pakistan’s nuclear capability. In fact quite a few would actually vote to take it back. Some wouldn’t mind destroying it physically if possible.

If ever documented, Pakistan’s journey from apparently innocuous KANUPP (Karachi Nuclear Power Plant) to KRL ( Khan Research Laboratory) onto Chagai Hills would pale the combined genius of John Le Carre, Robert Ludlum and Frederick Forsyth.

From Dr Usmani to Dr Qadeer and Dr Samar Mubarakmand, from Ayub Khan to Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, Ishaq khan, Ziaul Haq and Mian Nawaz Sharif, there’s a long list of scientists, engineers and leaders who rightly deserve to be credited for their contributions in developing Pakistan’s nuclear capability. It will be unfair not to recognised Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (ZAB) for the lions share in this regard. By his own admission, even the wiliest of foxes, Dr Henry Kissinger couldn’t help recognising his genius when he outwitted the good doctor twice. Once on Lahore Airport when Henry Kissinger wanted to discuss Pakistan’s nuclear program, ZAB told him politely that he couldn’t talk about it because of impending elections in Pakistan in 1977 and second time the Dr got hold of ZAB on Paris Airport where he was told that it was pointless to talk about it, this time because of impending elections in America. Only ZAB could do that to Henry Kissinger

ZAB also doesn’t get credit for one more critical decision that proved to be the game changer. He took this project out of routine bureaucratic channels and set up a special system involving only the most essential offices and persons. He put Army in charge with COAS coordinating all aspects of the program and reporting directly to the PM/ Chief Executive. Everything and everyone else kept changing but this constant, the Army, didn’t. It not only ensured much needed continuity, smooth and easy execution of the program removing all possible administrative and other hurdles but guarded it jealousy the way only army can. But for this crucial measure, who knows what would have happened given the uncertainties and lethargy that afflicts us as a nation.

Just one of the many incidents to make it clearer; Gen Abdul Waheed Kakar, on his first ever visit to USA was told that Americans are very keen to discuss this program. He response was sharp and clear, “No, Pakistan’s nuclear program is off limits”. As he landed in Washington and was being driven to his hotel, he was informed that Americans are adamant and will bring this subject up during negotiations. They were messing with wrong man. Gen Waheed Kakar ordered his staff there and then, “We are going back. Book our tickets back for Pakistan on the first available flight. I will never talk about something absolutely crucial for Pakistan’s security”. Americans had to concede to the will of this diminutive but rock solid COAS. Others preceding or following him didn’t waver either.

When we eulogise all others for their great contributions in giving us across the spectrum strategic deterrence, don’t forget this singular and crucial role played by our army. It will also be unfair if we don’t recognise the brave and courageous people of Pakistan without whose unflinching support we would be nowhere.
Hi,

Doesn't pakistan's journey start with Pinstech---because without it---there was no collection of brainpower of scientists to do the job---.
 

ghazi52

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Hi,

Doesn't pakistan's journey start with Pinstech---because without it---there was no collection of brainpower of scientists to do the job---.
True. Started from Ayub Khan with PINSTECH and laid foundation of first Nuclear Power Plant Karachi, KANNUP.

 

MastanKhan

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True. Started from Ayub Khan with PINSTECH and laid foundation of first Nuclear Power Plant Karachi, KANNUP.

Hi,

1968-1970 is the time frame when all the top pakistani scientists started coming back to pakistan and took over their positions at Pinstech.

Something was happening at that time---even before Bhutto came into power---.

These scientists were all prepped---positioned and ready for the big job even before Bhutto made the 'decision' to go nuclear---.
 

ghazi52

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All ground was in place before Bhutto.
In 1965, Abdus Salam traveled to United States, where in a ceremony, Canada and Pakistan signed a nuclear energy pact with Canadian General Electric (now GE Canada) establishing the country's first nuclear plant. Per agreement, the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission's engineers and scientists led the construction of the project, while GE Canada provided funds and natural uranium fuel. Parvez Butt, a nuclear engineer, was the chief designer of the plant at the GE Canada's designing office. In 1966, construction started, and it was completed in 1971. On November 28, 1972 then-President Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, accompanied by Abdus Salam and the PAEC's newly appointed Chairman Munir Ahmad Khan, inaugurated the first unit of the Karachi Nuclear Plant.
 

M. Sarmad

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All ground was in place before Bhutto.

In 1965, Abdus Salam traveled to United States, where in a ceremony, Canada and Pakistan signed a nuclear energy pact with Canadian General Electric (now GE Canada) establishing the country's first nuclear plant.
Bhutto had been arguing for a nuclear Pakistan since early 1960's in Pakistan’s cabinet as well as publicly but Ayub Khan was focused towards conventional superiority and building strong alliance with the US. Ayub was a supporter of Eisenhower's 'Atom for Peace' program. When Glenn Seaborg, the chairman of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, informed Ayub Khan in 1967 that India might have gained the capability of producing nuclear weapons, Ayub Khan, for the first time, expressed his 'concern' but he remained inclined towards the US and well-received the US president later that year.

The first thing Bhutto did after assuming office following the fall of Dhaka was to convene a meeting of nuclear scientists in Quetta (later moved to Multan) in Jan 1972 and task them to begin building a bomb. But the support for the nuclear weapons program was far from unanimous among the scientists who assembled at Multan. Neither Abdus Salam, nor Ishrat Usmani (head of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission) supported Bhutto's nuclear weapons program. Before that, the Bengali conflict contributed to an exodus of key scientists, technicians, and leaders from Pakistan, which had significantly stunted progress on the nuclear program. But Bhutto decided to go ahead with the Bomb despite all odds.

In November 1972, ZAB decided to withdraw Pakistan from SEATO and then immediately established formal diplomatic relations with North Korea. Persistent pressure by the US compelled Canada and France to refuse to live up to the agreements they had with Pakistan. But in September, 1974, Bhutto had received a letter via Pakistan’s Ambassador in Netherlands from a Pakistani nuclear scientist, A.Q. Khan. Khan had gained knowledge of centrifuge-based enrichment processes by working at the Uranium Enrichment Consortium (UNRENCO) in Netherlands. The rest is history.
 
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