What's new

No statute of limitation to hold trial of 1971 genocide by Pakistan army: Indian HC Doraiswami

Status
Not open for further replies.

Atlas

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 2, 2018
4,271
3
4,612
Country
Bangladesh
Location
Bangladesh
Bro, you don't need to explain this to me...I have 3 Bangladeshi neighbors and we are like FAMILIES to each other, they are constantly eating food over at our place and we are constantly over eating food at their place :-), they too say the same thing...they even say that the civil war would've never happened if bhutto had behaved and conceded the election as he should have and the united states hadn't jumped into the mix by pressurizing yahya khan because mujeeb was pro soviet and the u.s. did not want a pro soviet government in Pakistan's both wings. naturally, mujeeb went for independence, not like he had much of a choice and with the majority of the population being in East Pakistan with the bengalis in the military ranks over there naturally rebelling, it was a sealed fate...india is just like that neighborhood widow grandma that tries to take credit for something she never could and never will achieve.

Having said that...the writing is on the wall as far as Bangladesh is concerned, you guys need to start modernizing and strengthening your military with full force, ESPECIALLY the navy and the air force's naval wings...india is in no mood to let Bangladesh act independently and as per my neighbors, india keeps trying to manipulate Bangladesh by trying to block your water...you guys have a good military but only for a short, strictly defensive war lasting a couple of weeks, you need to develop a military that can punitively punish india in an "offensive", long drawn out campaign. We'll be more than happy to give SSMs and other goodies.
Wholeheartedly agree brother with every word of your message.

And specially about military. We are modernizing military but we must seriously look after the airforce and we have to modernize it right now. Now let's see where Allah Rabbul Alamin take us. Please pray for us. Thank you very much for the nice message. :cheers:
 

GumNaam

ELITE MEMBER
Sep 23, 2016
10,481
-1
13,943
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Wholeheartedly agree brother with every word of your message.

And specially about military. We are modernizing military but we must seriously look after the airforce and we have to modernize it right now. Now let's see where Allah Rabbul Alamin take us. Please pray for us. Thank you very much for the nice message. :cheers:
Of course, always. :-)
 

Atlas

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 2, 2018
4,271
3
4,612
Country
Bangladesh
Location
Bangladesh
whoever shows his face on facebook or youtube and goes against BAL is probably asking to be abducted.
Actually bro not that. People don't want to dig deeper and feel deeply . But if you dig deeper , Hasina is playing some games.

Hasina don't like media as she never got proper media backup at past. She also knows that many of her party goons are Indian stooge .

But I feel , she can't go against them directly though, as she will be murdered ( like her father) by the Indian stooge if she completely go against them .

Look at our situation, many people are criticizing Hasina day and night , still they are safe .

Look that quota movement, safe street movement , and later these students are often taking position on the street and doing well.

Only when BNP goes to street , police start serious offense.

It's clear that BNP won't be allowed to do anything as long as they Zia family is neutralised parmanetly from politics .

And I believe it's necessary. Do you know why BAL play the Pakistan and 1971 political card ?

Only because they lost ground to the BNP Jamat propaganda at past .

People of Bangladesh are emotional and they were deceived by the propaganda that BAL is Hindu lover and Indian stooge.

BAL choose 1971 card to counter them.

There were many propaganda of Jamat BNP that 1971 was was a war between Muslim and Hindus aka India Vs Pakistan, but in reality the case is opposite and this propaganda is actually Indian propaganda.

That's the reason when BAL play 1971 card people are convinced and don't pay attention against Jamati propaganda , as all people believe that the Hindu Muslim war propaganda is actually the propaganda of the burglar India , to divide and rule.

And now when BNP Jamat is neutralised ,and Zia family will be forgotten in Bangladesh ,no one will use dirty propaganda card to win election, BAL no longer need to mention 1971 to gain political benefits.

So actually suppressing BNP and raising other political parties is actually the plan of govt I believe ( although I have no evidence ,as such evidences aren't available.

I just dig deeper and analysis the things and equate with the ground reality of Bangladesh.
These Indians are back at it again conspiring when Pakistan= Bangladesh relation seems to be improving

Exactly. Fags claim the credit for 71 when they only participated for 1 week, lost thousands of soldiers and incompetent fucks couldn’t even organize a good tank battle at shiromoni and retreated leaving their tanks.
And later they looted people house like street thugs! Bloody beggar Indian army looted many costly things to even khichuri of panta bhat ( watered rice that is stale) cooked by poor families ! Such pathetic beggars they were!

And what can you expect from the nation of charals!
 
Last edited:

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
16,597
1
26,124
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
Ok cool

Also conduct a trial against your mass murderer PM too for his "performance" in Gujarat in 2002 while you are at it
This guy is a smiling face scumbag breaking all manner of diplomatic norms.

To investigate whether genocide took place by PA is OUR BUSINESS. His "Faida Uthana" statement is not welcome, nor is his poking Indian "Brown nose" into our affairs with Pakistan. He is an Indian guest in our country and should shut his filthy Sanghi mouth, otherwise its back to New Delhi.

While at it, we should also investigate what amount of machinery and arms were stolen from Bangladesh by Indian Army while retreating in early 1972. Indian soldiers even extracted money from the general populace in Bangladesh. Only "chaur, dacoit, harami and badmaash" are good names for such behavior.

We should also see how much in the last fifty or so years India has gained in uneven trade and medical tourism (in India) with Bangladesh. Should be about half a Trillion US dollars, all told.

Accounting should be accurate.
@Baibars_1260

What do you think?
What do YOU think? :lol:

Aadmee to Kolkatta-ka hai....:lol:
 

Baibars_1260

SENIOR MEMBER
Sep 12, 2020
2,203
0
2,154
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Make sure you provide the International War Crimes Tribunal at the Hague with all the evidence this time.......... :azn:...........especially the one where 40,000 lightly armed Pakistani troops kill 3 million bangladeshis and raped millions of bangladeshi women at the same time in just under 5 weeks in 1971..........:azn:.............:disagree:

I actually hope they do and they present a case to the International War Crimes Tribunal at the Hague..........😎

PS This is SO going to turn in to a severe troll thread...........:lol:

Both the governments of India and Bangladesh are involved in revisionist history. War Crimes trials was the last thing India wanted in the aftermath of the 1971 war . Declassified documents 50 years later show how Indira Gandhi and her advisers P.N. Haksar, D.P.Dhar and Indian COAS Sam Manekshaw threw Bangladesh under the bus.
India views at least a rapprochement with Pakistan far more important to its security and regional big power status ambitions, than relations with any other country.

Gary Bass of Princeton University wrote a paper "Bargaining away Justice " with now declassified information. His paper is fascinating because on one hand he laments the miscarriage of justice and on the other hand he gives a blow by blow account of how both India and Pakistan actively colluded to avoid dragging out the aftermath of the civil war in pursuit of their own security priorities.
All Bangladeshis, Pakistanis and Indians should read this.
(
Link )

The following extracts from the paper written by Princeton University Scholar Gary J Bass, "Bargaining away Justice" are extremely interesting.

" The basic reason was not legal, but military: although Indian troops and Bengali guerrillas had won a decisive victory in East Pakistan, the war had been inconclusive on the other front in West Pakistan. "

"As Hans Morgenthau put it, “[T]he principle of the defense of hu- man rights cannot be consistently applied in foreign policy because it can and it must come in conflict with other interests that may be more important than the defense of human rights in a particular instance.”31 In many ways, Bangladesh would seem a propitious case for prosecuting war criminals: there was a military victory by a liberal democracy; that democracy was appalled by the recent atrocities; it held many war crimes suspects in custody; and the per- petrator regime had collapsed. Even so, India, although victorious in the 1971 war, was not dominant enough to force Pakistan to accept humiliating trials of its troops. Instead, India sought its security through seizing a rare opportunity for making peace with Pakistan, embodied in the generous Simla agreement of 1972. With that strategic prize at stake, India proved ready to bargain away the trial of Pakistani war criminals. This was the kind of bargain that Huntington, Snyder, and Vinjamuri would expect.

In Bangladesh, too, international security concerns trumped the drive for retribution against the killers. Newly separate from Pakistan, Bangladesh desperately needed global acceptance as an independent state. With China and the United States hostile to the newborn country, Bangladesh feared lingering in a nether space of nonrecognition, which could tempt revanchism from Pakistan. Pakistan, however, insisted that the price of its recognition—a precedent-setting act of legitimation that would allow other states to follow—was impunity for war criminals. Bangladesh had little real choice but to acquiesce.

"At root, the problem was that India’s military dominance was not comparable to that of the Allies after winning the unconditional surrenders of Germany and Japan in World War II. It was not even as resounding as some less conclusive victories, such as the Allied victory over Germany and the Ottoman Empire in World War I or NATO’s 1995 victory in Bosnia.32 India could not impose its will on a helpless foe; it did not occupy West Pakistan, and could not have. Pakistan, even stripped of Bangladesh, remained capable of defying and provoking India. Under these strategic circumstances of a relatively incon- clusive victory, with the defeated foe’s cooperation needed for future security, some kind of amnesty was likely."

Summing up Gary Bass's paper:

The results of Pakistan's Civil War were not definite, unlike normal Civil Wars where the winning faction gets control of the entire nation. Pakistan retained control of its vital, strategic and far more defensible Western territory along with its rich mineral
and water resources and natural beauty. Pakistan also retained control of the core of its armed forces allowing it to rebuild and threaten India's territories .

Thus Pakistan's defeat was not like Germany or Japan in World War 2.
Pakistan deftly used its international clout to get back its prisoners and territories from India. But most important was India's desire to give preference to building relations with Pakistan over Bangladesh. I never knew this until a few days back when I read the excellent study on this subject that has been done by Princton University Scholar
Gary J Bass in his paper "Bargaining away Justice" . Reading this paper with declassified information now available is an eye opener for Pakistanis, Indians and Bangladeshis, As a Pakistani I felt quite relieved to read this document, and it made me look very differently on India 50 years after our Civil War. I am hopeful that if sense prevails now as it did then we can still avoid nuking ourselves. Then as of now Bangladesh was peripheral to the interests of both Pakistan and India.

Following is clear after reading this paper :

1. Bangladesh is never going to get any sort of "apology " from Pakistan. There will be no war crimes trials. Not even symbolic ones.

2. Semantics aside India is not going to pressurize or intercede with Pakistan on Bangladesh's behalf for war reparations, apologies, trials of "war criminals " nor will any other nation. Bangladesh is alone in dealing with Pakistan.

3. India is primarily concerned with avoiding a showdown with Pakistan, and will look to only display as much military posturing as to prevent a full blown war. There was a brief moment of madness in February 2019 but for now matters are likely to be quiet.

4. Optics aside, Pakistan has no real interest in negotiations or improved relations with Bangladesh, and the last thing Pakistan will discuss is the Civil War. If it had not been for the prisoners of war held by India, Pakistan may never have recognized Bangladesh and nor would the majority of Muslim nations as well as China.

5. Military incompetence has consequences. In the third week of December 1971, Bangladesh and India were at the peak of their friendship and power backed by the Soviet Union. Yet they were not strong enough to crush Pakistan in the West. The fighting in the West was by India alone, but India's failure to break Pakistan ultimately resulted in Bangladesh making a humiliating compromise on prisoners of war trials. So Bangladesh's dependence on India resulted in severe lack of maneuvering room.

Reading these 40 pages made me feel much better as a Pakistani. Deft diplomacy and raw military power worked for my nation. The USA, China and our Arab allies stood by us in those dark days. We have much to be grateful for.

I also ended up viewing India as it was then quite differently, and I regret that an opportunity to settle issues between my nation and India ( as has often happened) has been lost. Regardless, we were able to bring every one of our fighting boys home in dignity and honor, and even as an enemy we must give credit to India for sticking to International Law. Even if I have to say it... I salute India for this act of pragmatism.
 
Last edited:

TheSnakeEatingMarkhur

SENIOR MEMBER
Dec 26, 2018
2,671
6
2,802
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom
Published on 07:07 PM, February 15, 2021
No statute of limitation to hold trial of 1971 genocide by Pakistan army: Indian HC Doraiswami

www.thedailystar.net/world/south-asia/news/no-statute-limitation-hold-trial-1971-genocide-pakistan-army-doraiswami-2045257%3famp


Vikram Doraiswami. File photo
UNB, Dhaka

Indian High Commissioner to Bangladesh Vikram Doraiswami today indicated that the trial of genocide committed by Pakistan army during the 1971 Liberation War can take place anytime as there is no statute of limitations in terms of time.

"I think we should be clear about it without getting into legal formalities…in other words, even [if] something happened long ago," he said when asked which provision of the 1974 tripartite agreement is holding back to try the Pakistani generals who committed genocide during the War of Liberation in 1971.

There is no statute of limitation on any kind of arrangement that may have been arrived in and this is something entirely within [the jurisdiction of] the government of Bangladesh to assess the history and see how this goes forward, said the high commissioner.

"History is history," said Doraiswami noting that the question is relevant this year when Bangladesh is set to celebrate 50 years of its independence.

Bangladesh has recently reiterated the importance of resolving outstanding bilateral issues with Pakistan, including an official apology from Pakistan for the genocide it committed during Bangladesh's Liberation War in 1971.

Bangladesh also sought completion of the repatriation of stranded Pakistanis in Bangladesh, and settling the issue of the division of assets.

Bangladesh also made it clear that it cannot forget the atrocities committed by Pakistan in 1971 and the pain will remain forever.
Will trial include Muktis and some part of Indian army Butchering the West Pakistanis and the Biharis ?
 

masterchief_mirza

ELITE MEMBER
Apr 29, 2019
9,784
17
20,479
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom
All this pip squeak of a (not so) high commissioner seems to be saying here is: "we are getting more and more desperate for Dhaka to say something inflammatory towards Islamabad....anything at all....pretty please."
Both the governments of India and Bangladesh are involved in revisionist history. War Crimes trials was the last thing India wanted in the aftermath of the 1971 war . Declassified documents 50 years later show how Indira Gandhi and her advisers P.N. Haksar, D.P.Dhar and Indian COAS Sam Manekshaw threw Bangladesh under the bus.
India views at least a rapprochement with Pakistan far more important to its security and regional big power status ambitions, than relations with any other country.

Gary Bass of Princeton University wrote a paper "Bargaining away Justice " with now declassified information. His paper is fascinating because on one hand he laments the miscarriage of justice and on the other hand he gives a blow by blow account of how both India and Pakistan actively colluded to avoid dragging out the aftermath of the civil war in pursuit of their own security priorities.
All Bangladeshis, Pakistanis and Indians should read this.
(
Link )

The following extracts from the paper written by Princeton University Scholar Gary J Bass, "Bargaining away Justice" are extremely interesting.

" The basic reason was not legal, but military: although Indian troops and Bengali guerrillas had won a decisive victory in East Pakistan, the war had been inconclusive on the other front in West Pakistan. "

"As Hans Morgenthau put it, “[T]he principle of the defense of hu- man rights cannot be consistently applied in foreign policy because it can and it must come in conflict with other interests that may be more important than the defense of human rights in a particular instance.”31 In many ways, Bangladesh would seem a propitious case for prosecuting war criminals: there was a military victory by a liberal democracy; that democracy was appalled by the recent atrocities; it held many war crimes suspects in custody; and the per- petrator regime had collapsed. Even so, India, although victorious in the 1971 war, was not dominant enough to force Pakistan to accept humiliating trials of its troops. Instead, India sought its security through seizing a rare opportunity for making peace with Pakistan, embodied in the generous Simla agreement of 1972. With that strategic prize at stake, India proved ready to bargain away the trial of Pakistani war criminals. This was the kind of bargain that Huntington, Snyder, and Vinjamuri would expect.

In Bangladesh, too, international security concerns trumped the drive for retribution against the killers. Newly separate from Pakistan, Bangladesh desperately needed global acceptance as an independent state. With China and the United States hostile to the newborn country, Bangladesh feared lingering in a nether space of nonrecognition, which could tempt revanchism from Pakistan. Pakistan, however, insisted that the price of its recognition—a precedent-setting act of legitimation that would allow other states to follow—was impunity for war criminals. Bangladesh had little real choice but to acquiesce.

"At root, the problem was that India’s military dominance was not comparable to that of the Allies after winning the unconditional surrenders of Germany and Japan in World War II. It was not even as resounding as some less conclusive victories, such as the Allied victory over Germany and the Ottoman Empire in World War I or NATO’s 1995 victory in Bosnia.32 India could not impose its will on a helpless foe; it did not occupy West Pakistan, and could not have. Pakistan, even stripped of Bangladesh, remained capable of defying and provoking India. Under these strategic circumstances of a relatively incon- clusive victory, with the defeated foe’s cooperation needed for future security, some kind of amnesty was likely."

Summing up Gary Bass's paper:

The results of Pakistan's Civil War were not definite, unlike normal Civil Wars where the winning faction gets control of the entire nation. Pakistan retained control of its vital, strategic and far more defensible Western territory along with its rich mineral
and water resources and natural beauty. Pakistan also retained control of the core of its armed forces allowing it to rebuild and threaten India's territories .

Thus Pakistan's defeat was not like Germany or Japan in World War 2.
Pakistan deftly used its international clout to get back its prisoners and territories from India. But most important was India's desire to give preference to building relations with Pakistan over Bangladesh. I never knew this until a few days back when I read the excellent study on this subject that has been done by Princton University Scholar
Gary J Bass in his paper "Bargaining away Justice" . Reading this paper with declassified information now available is an eye opener for Pakistanis, Indians and Bangladeshis, As a Pakistani I felt quite relieved to read this document, and it made me look very differently on India 50 years after our Civil War. I am hopeful that if sense prevails now as it did then we can still avoid nuking ourselves. Then as of now Bangladesh was peripheral to the interests of both Pakistan and India.

Following is clear after reading this paper :

1. Bangladesh is never going to get any sort of "apology " from Pakistan. There will be no war crimes trials. Not even symbolic ones.

2. Semantics aside India is not going to pressurize or intercede with Pakistan on Bangladesh's behalf for war reparations, apologies, trials of "war criminals " nor will any other nation. Bangladesh is alone in dealing with Pakistan.

3. India is primarily concerned with avoiding a showdown with Pakistan, and will look to only display as much military posturing as to prevent a full blown war. There was a brief moment of madness in February 2019 but for now matters are likely to be quiet.

4. Optics aside, Pakistan has no real interest in negotiations or improved relations with Bangladesh, and the last thing Pakistan will discuss is the Civil War. If it had not been for the prisoners of war held by India, Pakistan may never have recognized Bangladesh and nor would the majority of Muslim nations as well as China.

5. Military incompetence has consequences. In the third week of December 1971, Bangladesh and India were at the peak of their friendship and power backed by the Soviet Union. Yet they were not strong enough to crush Pakistan in the West. The fighting in the West was by India alone, but India's failure to break Pakistan ultimately resulted in Bangladesh making a humiliating compromise on prisoners of war trials. So Bangladesh's dependence on India resulted in severe lack of maneuvering room.

Reading these 40 pages made me feel much better as a Pakistani. Deft diplomacy and raw military power worked for my nation. The USA, China and our Arab allies stood by us in those dark days. We have much to be grateful for.

I also ended up viewing India as it was then quite differently, and I regret that an opportunity to settle issues between my nation and India ( as has often happened) has been lost. Regardless, we were able to bring every one of our fighting boys home in dignity and honor, and even as an enemy we must give credit to India for sticking to International Law. Even if I have to say it... I salute India for this act of chivalry.
Excellent insights! Not sure I can see this Indian "chivalry" here though. Looks like straightforward pragmatism to me.
 
Last edited:

pakpride00090

SENIOR MEMBER
Feb 28, 2019
2,198
-2
4,393
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Both the governments of India and Bangladesh are involved in revisionist history. War Crimes trials was the last thing India wanted in the aftermath of the 1971 war . Declassified documents 50 years later show how Indira Gandhi and her advisers P.N. Haksar, D.P.Dhar and Indian COAS Sam Manekshaw threw Bangladesh under the bus.
India views at least a rapprochement with Pakistan far more important to its security and regional big power status ambitions, than relations with any other country.

Gary Bass of Princeton University wrote a paper "Bargaining away Justice " with now declassified information. His paper is fascinating because on one hand he laments the miscarriage of justice and on the other hand he gives a blow by blow account of how both India and Pakistan actively colluded to avoid dragging out the aftermath of the civil war in pursuit of their own security priorities.
All Bangladeshis, Pakistanis and Indians should read this.
(
Link )

The following extracts from the paper written by Princeton University Scholar Gary J Bass, "Bargaining away Justice" are extremely interesting.

" The basic reason was not legal, but military: although Indian troops and Bengali guerrillas had won a decisive victory in East Pakistan, the war had been inconclusive on the other front in West Pakistan. "

"As Hans Morgenthau put it, “[T]he principle of the defense of hu- man rights cannot be consistently applied in foreign policy because it can and it must come in conflict with other interests that may be more important than the defense of human rights in a particular instance.”31 In many ways, Bangladesh would seem a propitious case for prosecuting war criminals: there was a military victory by a liberal democracy; that democracy was appalled by the recent atrocities; it held many war crimes suspects in custody; and the per- petrator regime had collapsed. Even so, India, although victorious in the 1971 war, was not dominant enough to force Pakistan to accept humiliating trials of its troops. Instead, India sought its security through seizing a rare opportunity for making peace with Pakistan, embodied in the generous Simla agreement of 1972. With that strategic prize at stake, India proved ready to bargain away the trial of Pakistani war criminals. This was the kind of bargain that Huntington, Snyder, and Vinjamuri would expect.

In Bangladesh, too, international security concerns trumped the drive for retribution against the killers. Newly separate from Pakistan, Bangladesh desperately needed global acceptance as an independent state. With China and the United States hostile to the newborn country, Bangladesh feared lingering in a nether space of nonrecognition, which could tempt revanchism from Pakistan. Pakistan, however, insisted that the price of its recognition—a precedent-setting act of legitimation that would allow other states to follow—was impunity for war criminals. Bangladesh had little real choice but to acquiesce.

"At root, the problem was that India’s military dominance was not comparable to that of the Allies after winning the unconditional surrenders of Germany and Japan in World War II. It was not even as resounding as some less conclusive victories, such as the Allied victory over Germany and the Ottoman Empire in World War I or NATO’s 1995 victory in Bosnia.32 India could not impose its will on a helpless foe; it did not occupy West Pakistan, and could not have. Pakistan, even stripped of Bangladesh, remained capable of defying and provoking India. Under these strategic circumstances of a relatively incon- clusive victory, with the defeated foe’s cooperation needed for future security, some kind of amnesty was likely."

Summing up Gary Bass's paper:

The results of Pakistan's Civil War were not definite, unlike normal Civil Wars where the winning faction gets control of the entire nation. Pakistan retained control of its vital, strategic and far more defensible Western territory along with its rich mineral
and water resources and natural beauty. Pakistan also retained control of the core of its armed forces allowing it to rebuild and threaten India's territories .

Thus Pakistan's defeat was not like Germany or Japan in World War 2.
Pakistan deftly used its international clout to get back its prisoners and territories from India. But most important was India's desire to give preference to building relations with Pakistan over Bangladesh. I never knew this until a few days back when I read the excellent study on this subject that has been done by Princton University Scholar
Gary J Bass in his paper "Bargaining away Justice" . Reading this paper with declassified information now available is an eye opener for Pakistanis, Indians and Bangladeshis, As a Pakistani I felt quite relieved to read this document, and it made me look very differently on India 50 years after our Civil War. I am hopeful that if sense prevails now as it did then we can still avoid nuking ourselves. Then as of now Bangladesh was peripheral to the interests of both Pakistan and India.

Following is clear after reading this paper :

1. Bangladesh is never going to get any sort of "apology " from Pakistan. There will be no war crimes trials. Not even symbolic ones.

2. Semantics aside India is not going to pressurize or intercede with Pakistan on Bangladesh's behalf for war reparations, apologies, trials of "war criminals " nor will any other nation. Bangladesh is alone in dealing with Pakistan.

3. India is primarily concerned with avoiding a showdown with Pakistan, and will look to only display as much military posturing as to prevent a full blown war. There was a brief moment of madness in February 2019 but for now matters are likely to be quiet.

4. Optics aside, Pakistan has no real interest in negotiations or improved relations with Bangladesh, and the last thing Pakistan will discuss is the Civil War. If it had not been for the prisoners of war held by India, Pakistan may never have recognized Bangladesh and nor would the majority of Muslim nations as well as China.

5. Military incompetence has consequences. In the third week of December 1971, Bangladesh and India were at the peak of their friendship and power backed by the Soviet Union. Yet they were not strong enough to crush Pakistan in the West. The fighting in the West was by India alone, but India's failure to break Pakistan ultimately resulted in Bangladesh making a humiliating compromise on prisoners of war trials. So Bangladesh's dependence on India resulted in severe lack of maneuvering room.

Reading these 40 pages made me feel much better as a Pakistani. Deft diplomacy and raw military power worked for my nation. The USA, China and our Arab allies stood by us in those dark days. We have much to be grateful for.

I also ended up viewing India as it was then quite differently, and I regret that an opportunity to settle issues between my nation and India ( as has often happened) has been lost. Regardless, we were able to bring every one of our fighting boys home in dignity and honor, and even as an enemy we must give credit to India for sticking to International Law. Even if I have to say it... I salute India for this act of chivalry.

This guy really has very good geo political knowledge. I would suggest keeping an eye on him and give him some title on PDF.
Well done.

@waz..Just a suggestion.
 

Silverblaze

SENIOR MEMBER
Nov 25, 2012
2,373
3
2,948
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Ok.
Pakistan should immediately demand India to start a trial of Hyderabad genocide under indias own Sunderlal committee report.
 
Last edited:

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
16,597
1
26,124
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
In most years - these days, India's gain in uneven trade, employment of their illegals in Bangladesh (and subsequent remittance to India) and Bangladeshi travel/medical tourism to India is around $50 Billion per year (or possibly more).

Back in the day in the seventies, it was probably around at least half a Billion dollars a year. so if you avg. $10 Billion per year for 50 years it makes $500 Billion altogether.

This is way too much of an underestimation IMHO but goes to illustrate how much Indian chamars gained by 'assisting' Bangladeshis in 1971. It should be a whole lot more.

To say nothing of the wholesale looting of all industrial machinery, vehicles and entire industrial complexes. They cleaned us out. There is proof of all this going around.

Chanakya Niti (policy) was a gainer for India.

And these Indian Hindutvas cry about Bangladeshi infiltrators in India.

And boast in big words about 'loaning' us their ten old junker locomotives, as if they did us "such a friggin' favor'. As if buying parts for the upkeep of this garbage will make them more money hand-over-fist.

I suggest Bangladesh Railway return this junk as soon as we get our US-made broad gauge locos.
 

Jobless Jack

FULL MEMBER
Aug 12, 2012
1,852
0
2,159
Published on 07:07 PM, February 15, 2021
No statute of limitation to hold trial of 1971 genocide by Pakistan army: Indian HC Doraiswami

www.thedailystar.net/world/south-asia/news/no-statute-limitation-hold-trial-1971-genocide-pakistan-army-doraiswami-2045257%3famp


Vikram Doraiswami. File photo
UNB, Dhaka

Indian High Commissioner to Bangladesh Vikram Doraiswami today indicated that the trial of genocide committed by Pakistan army during the 1971 Liberation War can take place anytime as there is no statute of limitations in terms of time.

"I think we should be clear about it without getting into legal formalities…in other words, even [if] something happened long ago," he said when asked which provision of the 1974 tripartite agreement is holding back to try the Pakistani generals who committed genocide during the War of Liberation in 1971.

There is no statute of limitation on any kind of arrangement that may have been arrived in and this is something entirely within [the jurisdiction of] the government of Bangladesh to assess the history and see how this goes forward, said the high commissioner.

"History is history," said Doraiswami noting that the question is relevant this year when Bangladesh is set to celebrate 50 years of its independence.

Bangladesh has recently reiterated the importance of resolving outstanding bilateral issues with Pakistan, including an official apology from Pakistan for the genocide it committed during Bangladesh's Liberation War in 1971.

Bangladesh also sought completion of the repatriation of stranded Pakistanis in Bangladesh, and settling the issue of the division of assets.

Bangladesh also made it clear that it cannot forget the atrocities committed by Pakistan in 1971 and the pain will remain forever.
I wonder how long you will keep beating your dead meat simp lord?
 

Baibars_1260

SENIOR MEMBER
Sep 12, 2020
2,203
0
2,154
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Excellent insights! Not sure I can see this Indian "chivalry" here though. Looks like straightforward pragmatism to me.
My apologies I stand corrected. I will amend that sentence in my post.
Pragmatism is the correct word. It was India that had to deal with a rapidly rearming Pakistan on its border, not Bangladesh. The situation hasn't changed much though. But we can put aside those dark days forever and look to the future with hope and courage.

Not really related to the topic but if ever there was a show of Islamic Ummah solidarity with Pakistan it was during the period from December 16th 1971 to 22 February 1974 when Sheikh Mujib attended the Lahore OIC summit . The bulk of the Muslim majority nations had boycotted Bangladesh for 3 years pressurizing it to drop the demand for war crimes trials. Ultimately on April 9, Bangladesh signed the Delhi Agreement . Our boys were coming home.

This guy really has very good geo political knowledge. I would suggest keeping an eye on him and give him some title on PDF.
Well done.

@waz..Just a suggestion.
Thank you for appreciating. An honest exchange of views is all we require.
I only request that we discuss, with our nation uppermost in our mind. We are Pakistanis first , writing on our own Pakistani forum with respect and love for our nation. We bear no illwill to the peoples of other nations or other faiths. We will speak up for our nation before guests who sometimes insult our hospitality.

Bangladesh and Pakistan are two sovereign independent nations with no geographical boundaries. Our people are different in race, language, culture, cuisine, and dress. Our brief union of 24 years was an artificial one and is gone forever. Both our nations must move on and as a Pakistani I wish Bangladesh well.

Far more important we must look west to our immediate neighbors , Iran and , Afghanistan, with whom we have close cultural similarities. China is our powerful ally. If fate had willed it, then we would also have had peace and friendship with our biggest neighbor India (or in our "dreams" even an alliance). We can't wish India away, and India can't wish us away. Unless, of course we nuke each other...
 
Last edited:

Species

SENIOR MEMBER
Oct 12, 2014
3,274
-6
5,796
Country
Bangladesh
Location
Bangladesh
Not really related to the topic but if ever there was a show of Islamic Ummah solidarity with Pakistan it was during the period from December 16th 1971 to 22 February 1974 when Sheikh Mujib attended the Lahore OIC summit . The bulk of the Muslim majority nations had boycotted Bangladesh for 3 years pressurizing it to drop the demand for war crimes trials. Ultimately on April 9, Bangladesh signed the Delhi Agreement . Our boys were coming home.
Pressure were both on Bangladesh and Pakistan to reconcile and both Mujib and Bhutto had to take fairly non-populist decisions - dropping the demand for war crimes trial and the recognition of Bangladesh.

Countries like Iraq, Algeria, Turkey, Indonesia, Malaysia had already recognized Bangladesh by the end of 1972, way before Pakistan's recognition. Ice began to melt drastically when Bangladesh stood by the Arab cause during the Arab-Israeli war in 1973. Besides, it wasn't seen prudent by the OIC to ignore the second largest Muslim-majority nation at that time. Algerian President Houari Boumédiène himself escorted Sheikh Mujib from Dhaka to the OIC summit at Lahore.
 
Last edited:

Silverblaze

SENIOR MEMBER
Nov 25, 2012
2,373
3
2,948
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
and even as an enemy we must give credit to India for sticking to International Law. Even if I have to say it... I salute India for this act of pragmatism.
Once again a valuable share.
Thanks.

Hindutva india was actually planning to attack West Pakistan. It was international pressure and its own military limitations that halted its plans. Frankly, there was never any desire for peace.

Even then india continued interference in Balochistan and KP erstwhile Nwfp. Large scale operations are testament to that.

Loss of East Pakistan is a loss Pakistan should never forget. If we separated like Czechslovakia, there would not have been any complaints. The manner it happened is what makes it unforgettable.

india has and never will reconcile itself with Pakistan's existence. It is up to Pakistan to carve up a living space for itself.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom