What's new

New Zealand leader Ardern takes tougher stance on China

rent4country

BANNED
Jul 31, 2020
1,360
-6
757
Country
United States
Location
United States
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern took a tougher stance on China's human rights record Monday by saying it was getting harder to reconcile differences as China's role in the world grows.

While Ardern's language remained moderate when compared with that of many other leaders, it still marked a significant shift for a country which relies on China as its largest trading partner. Ardern in past speeches has often avoided direct criticism of China.

New Zealand has been trying to strike the right tone on China in recent weeks after finding itself on the defensive with its Five Eyes security allies by resisting speaking out in unison with them against China on certain human rights issues.


New Zealand Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta caused a diplomatic stir last month when she discussed her reluctance to expand the role of the Five Eyes to include joint positions on human rights. The alliance among New Zealand, the U.S., the U.K, Australia and Canada has its origins in World War II cooperation.

In her speech to the China Business Summit in Auckland on Monday, Ardern said New Zealand has raised “grave” concerns with China on human rights issues, including the situation of Uyghurs in the Xinjiang region and people who live in Hong Kong.

“And it will not have escaped the attention of anyone here that as China’s role in the world grows and changes, the differences between our systems – and the interests and values that shape those systems – are becoming harder to reconcile,” Ardern told the audience.

Stephen Noakes, the director of the China Studies Centre at the University of Auckland, said he wouldn't have expected to hear such language from New Zealand even a couple of years ago. He said some of it sounded like a wink to the Five Eyes to let them know that although New Zealand might have economic dependencies on China, it wasn't being soft.

 

Feng Leng

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 3, 2017
4,332
-17
10,605
Country
China
Location
China
LOL you are all fooled by Arden's lip service. She already told the USA to take a hike. She won't sacrifice her country's interests for USA's agenda.
 

rent4country

BANNED
Jul 31, 2020
1,360
-6
757
Country
United States
Location
United States
LOL you are all fooled by Arden's lip service. She already told the USA to take a hike. She won't sacrifice her country's interests for USA's agenda.
That's sad how much you crave to be liked and are in denial when you don't get it.

How many leaders have to disrespect you daily for you Chinese to have an ounce of shame. lol
 

CAPRICORN-88

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 19, 2015
2,601
-4
5,190
Country
Singapore
Location
Malaysia
If one were to investigate the first case of all these nations including India, none of them came from China nor have the patient ever been to Wuhan e.g. Japan first confirmed case came from Hawaii, Italy from USA, etc

But all the triple mutant Indian variants came from India.
 

CAPRICORN-88

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 19, 2015
2,601
-4
5,190
Country
Singapore
Location
Malaysia
How on earth did the crews and sailors of USN warships e.g. its Aircraft Carriers out in Pacific contacted COVID since it was out in the sea months before Wuhan first case?
None of the crews ever been to China?
 

jupiter2007

SENIOR MEMBER
Feb 19, 2007
4,371
-1
3,170
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern took a tougher stance on China's human rights record Monday by saying it was getting harder to reconcile differences as China's role in the world grows.

While Ardern's language remained moderate when compared with that of many other leaders, it still marked a significant shift for a country which relies on China as its largest trading partner. Ardern in past speeches has often avoided direct criticism of China.

New Zealand has been trying to strike the right tone on China in recent weeks after finding itself on the defensive with its Five Eyes security allies by resisting speaking out in unison with them against China on certain human rights issues.


New Zealand Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta caused a diplomatic stir last month when she discussed her reluctance to expand the role of the Five Eyes to include joint positions on human rights. The alliance among New Zealand, the U.S., the U.K, Australia and Canada has its origins in World War II cooperation.

In her speech to the China Business Summit in Auckland on Monday, Ardern said New Zealand has raised “grave” concerns with China on human rights issues, including the situation of Uyghurs in the Xinjiang region and people who live in Hong Kong.

“And it will not have escaped the attention of anyone here that as China’s role in the world grows and changes, the differences between our systems – and the interests and values that shape those systems – are becoming harder to reconcile,” Ardern told the audience.

Stephen Noakes, the director of the China Studies Centre at the University of Auckland, said he wouldn't have expected to hear such language from New Zealand even a couple of years ago. He said some of it sounded like a wink to the Five Eyes to let them know that although New Zealand might have economic dependencies on China, it wasn't being soft.

Do they not see human right abuse in India? Killing of Muslims, Christians and low chaste Hindus?
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom