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New Crises: Najam Sethi believes PM Khan has 6 months left in office

M.Bison

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Not sure if the awaam will be happy with wardi wala but Pakistan is already under martial law under the guise of a puppet party (PTI), but when it does happen, I believe DG ISI Faiz Hameed sb will take up the role.
Awaam is a collective sheep. In my humble opinion, it is better to be the puppet of the army than to be the puppet of India or whoever else.

A country like Pakistan will always have a political Army. As long as there is India, there will be a General somewhere whose balls are itching to take power. It is just the hand we have been dealt with. Pakistan is surrounded by enemies and there is no way human beings won't take advantage of that.

Now the issue of Imran being a puppet of the Army. There might be some truth to that but I highly doubt it. You can say that Imran Khan cooperates with the military but I do think that he was put into power by the army.

If the army is handling Imran khan.. then why wasn't he given full power? He has an extremely weak government as evident by Sharif's release. The people crying wolf about sharif are the same people that made a coalition government with Imran.

If the "political wing" of ISI exists and is involved then there would have been a massive propaganda campaign against the PPP and PMN. Remember they have years of experience from the Soviet war in Afghanistan. If the army was handling Imran Khan they would have had been working to bring him to power over years and years. They would have laid a propper network to get rid of the other two parties or at least make one of them their friend while working on the other. The fact that Imran Khan is failing proves that the army is not the puppeteer.

ISI is very competent and they would have taken care of the fiefdoms and worked to make the central government extremely strong with Imran Khan being the puppet. It is not like that at all. This dude doesn't even have the majority in parliament. They would have worked to get rid of the parliament. I would give general zia's rule and the rise and fall of MQM as an example.
This is actually a red herring used by Imran Khan's opponents. His ideas are too revolutionary and that is an easy excuse.

Never a ruling general fired so many people in bureaucracy as current PM did.
Without doubt, we are living in dictatorial rule, same is Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, who used to insult army officers and bureaucracy alike.

We don't know what happens next moment but no sky will fall, if donkey kingdom is relieved of their charge. Public will welcome it.
He could have fired them because they were incompetent. Bureaucracy in Pakistan is extremely incompetent and the foreign office is proof of that.
I mean go to Allama Iqbal Airport and you will know Pakistani bureaucracy first hand. Some of the richest Individuals in Pakistan are bureaucrats and they have held the people hostage. IMO they are just as bad as the corrupt politicians and need to be brought to justice.

Giving extension to CoAS is not legal, as per current constitution.
Imran Khan, as usual tried to dictate his will over the constitution of Pakistan, which has been rightfully striked down by CJ.
at least something is beyond the prerogative of IK.
Law is open to interpretation. There is no legal document in the world that is all-encompassing including the Pakistani Constitution. So to say that an extension to any officer of the government is illegal is a stretch and misleading.
The CoAS is a position appointed by the ruling party and it is their prerogative to extend his tenure or frankly kick him out. There are many things that the government does that are not in the constitution so we cannot cherry-pick what we like.
Are the Chief justices extenstions illegal too?
 

Yaseen1

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no chief justice is given extension in Pakistan like coas are given extensions
Awaam is a collective sheep. In my humble opinion, it is better to be the puppet of the army than to be the puppet of India or whoever else.

A country like Pakistan will always have a political Army. As long as there is India, there will be a General somewhere whose balls are itching to take power. It is just the hand we have been dealt with. Pakistan is surrounded by enemies and there is no way human beings won't take advantage of that.

Now the issue of Imran being a puppet of the Army. There might be some truth to that but I highly doubt it. You can say that Imran Khan cooperates with the military but I do think that he was put into power by the army.

If the army is handling Imran khan.. then why wasn't he given full power? He has an extremely weak government as evident by Sharif's release. The people crying wolf about sharif are the same people that made a coalition government with Imran.

If the "political wing" of ISI exists and is involved then there would have been a massive propaganda campaign against the PPP and PMN. Remember they have years of experience from the Soviet war in Afghanistan. If the army was handling Imran Khan they would have had been working to bring him to power over years and years. They would have laid a propper network to get rid of the other two parties or at least make one of them their friend while working on the other. The fact that Imran Khan is failing proves that the army is not the puppeteer.

ISI is very competent and they would have taken care of the fiefdoms and worked to make the central government extremely strong with Imran Khan being the puppet. It is not like that at all. This dude doesn't even have the majority in parliament. They would have worked to get rid of the parliament. I would give general zia's rule and the rise and fall of MQM as an example.
This is actually a red herring used by Imran Khan's opponents. His ideas are too revolutionary and that is an easy excuse.



He could have fired them because they were incompetent. Bureaucracy in Pakistan is extremely incompetent and the foreign office is proof of that.
I mean go to Allama Iqbal Airport and you will know Pakistani bureaucracy first hand. Some of the richest Individuals in Pakistan are bureaucrats and they have held the people hostage. IMO they are just as bad as the corrupt politicians and need to be brought to justice.



Law is open to interpretation. There is no legal document in the world that is all-encompassing including the Pakistani Constitution. So to say that an extension to any officer of the government is illegal is a stretch and misleading.
The CoAS is a position appointed by the ruling party and it is their prerogative to extend his tenure or frankly kick him out. There are many things that the government does that are not in the constitution so we cannot cherry-pick what we like.
Are the Chief justices extenstions illegal too?
 

AZ1

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So this is what it comes to now Credible Sethi and Hamid Mir lefafa lol. Really hater of IK living in dream land.

Day after day, Week after week and month after month for end of PTI govt.
 

Syed1.

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Hahahha buhat boray din chal rahay hain agar Sethi pe umeed lagayi hoi hai :partay:



Kabhi kabar mein sochta hoon Immy ne kuch zayda hi zulm kardiya hai patwari qaum pe, leken phir yeh patwari moh kholtay hain aur mein majboor hojata hoon kehnay ke liyay shaba Immy do more :enjoy:
 

Thorough Pro

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This is 5th generation warfare. Create a lie and then keep feeding it to public day and night until they start to believe it.

I hope Musharrf burns in hell for allowing so many tv stations that have only helped spread lies, corruption, unrest and stress.







New Crisis
November 29, 2019
By Najam Sethi


View attachment 592128

The gallery is sorely disappointed. Shouts of “Noora Kushti”, “Topi Drama”, and many foul expletives deleted that leave nothing to the imagination rend the air. The people are variously cynical or outraged.

But Imran Khan, for one, has tweeted his delight that the opposition’s hopes of a clash of institutions have been dashed. After the short order, the two most incompetent spokespersons of the PTI government, Firdaus Awan and Farogh Nasim, were veritably sweating with relief.

Is the crisis over? Have the judges resolved the crisis? Will everything be hunky dory now?

No, on all counts. A new political crisis has just begun. Consider
.

The short order sets out to clarify some murky areas that have historically bedeviled civil-military relations and tilted the balance in the Miltablishment’s favour. After the fallout, the legal and constitutional ambiguities in favour of the Miltablishment will inevitably be ironed out in favour of civil society. The fact that the judges have only given a sitting army chief a reprieve of six months and put the selected government on notice to sort out the matter in the highest civilian forum of the country, parliament, is sufficient proof of this mood. That is the good part.

The case exposes the PTI government to be unprecedentedly incompetent and dangerously stupid.
It is bound to trigger some serious rethink in the Miltablishment about the quality, reliability and sustainability of such a sole political partner for the breadth of socio-economic transformation it has in mind. By dragging the army chief into the dock, yoking him with a six-month extension and compelling the brass to go back to the drawing board and war game the near political future, it has opened the floodgates of nasty debates and speculation about his person no less than his institution. The “same page” narrators must be seething with rage at the exposure of their hollow claims. This is also all for the good.

If truth be told, the judges could not, realistically speaking, have sent an army chief packing. Nor could they have ignored the blatant errors of omission and commission by the PTI government. They have done the next best thing: kept the ball in flight and kicked it in the direction of parliament where it belongs.

Two broad conflicts will open shortly. The first is legal. Does the order envisage a constitutional amendment or will a simple act of parliament suffice to resolve the matter? The debate will rage far and wide. The first requires a 2/3 majority in parliament which cannot be obtained without the support of the opposition. There’s no way the opposition can concede it without a big quid pro quo, as much from the PTI as from the Miltablishment, unless it is ready to commit political hara kiri exactly when it can smell its enemy’s blood. The other option will be challenged in parliament and in the courts again, making it a long drawn out and noisy affair that will keep everyone guessing while destabilizing economy and society.

The second is political. Resolving the matter in six months without the opposition’s agreement is going to be a tall order. If, as is likely, Imran Khan persists with his victimization campaign, the opposition will see the political wisdom of not succumbing to any Miltablishment pressure. This may provoke the Miltablishment to lose patience with Imran Khan and fall back on Plan B. If Nawaz Sharif’s recent “relief” case is an indication of the suspicions aroused in the PM’s camp, which led to tensions with the judges and Miltablishment, we can imagine a worse scenario in the near future.

While new confrontational fronts are going to open, we can be sure that existing ones will be accentuated as a perception grows that the PTI’s expiry date is nearing with the Miltablishment’s Khan romance on the wane. The foreign funding case is “open and shut”, and if the current Chief Justice of Pakistan doesn’t deliver justice, the next one is going to be under greater pressure to assert his honour. Similarly, the judges may drag their feet on the Musharraf case but the verdict cannot be sidestepped much longer. If the Miltablishment’s back is going to be scratched in one case, a balance is likely to be struck by spiking Imran Khan in the other.

Whichever way one looks at it, it will require a Herculean effort of stupidity by the combined opposition to fritter away the best opportunity to come their way in a long time to drive an irrevocable wedge between the PTI and Miltablishment. Either the Miltablishment can continue on a path with the PTI that has brought anguish and discredit to it or it can ditch it, making new allies and cutting its losses. Certainly, the current junta has lost face in the eyes of the people.

If Pakistan’s power-stakeholders are not to confirm the country’s “banana republic” status in a moment of national crisis, they should help restore law and democratic order under a competent consensus government.

https://www.thefridaytimes.com/new-crisis/

 

Hakikat ve Hikmet

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Looks like this folk would die of a heart attack due to an acute depression if Pak remains on in the current track for six more months...

No doubt his monthly income from RAW, CIA, MOSAD etc. has had a drastic cut recently, and it’ll be all gone after six months...

Bastards....

God willing, there will be a day when Pak folks will find these traitors with slashed throats being swamped in their own poops and peeps....
 
Last edited:

SIPRA

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First, these people were saying that something is going to happen in December. Now they have gone for six months.
 

Verve

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New Crisis
November 29, 2019
By Najam Sethi


View attachment 592128

The gallery is sorely disappointed. Shouts of “Noora Kushti”, “Topi Drama”, and many foul expletives deleted that leave nothing to the imagination rend the air. The people are variously cynical or outraged.

But Imran Khan, for one, has tweeted his delight that the opposition’s hopes of a clash of institutions have been dashed. After the short order, the two most incompetent spokespersons of the PTI government, Firdaus Awan and Farogh Nasim, were veritably sweating with relief.

Is the crisis over? Have the judges resolved the crisis? Will everything be hunky dory now?

No, on all counts. A new political crisis has just begun. Consider
.

The short order sets out to clarify some murky areas that have historically bedeviled civil-military relations and tilted the balance in the Miltablishment’s favour. After the fallout, the legal and constitutional ambiguities in favour of the Miltablishment will inevitably be ironed out in favour of civil society. The fact that the judges have only given a sitting army chief a reprieve of six months and put the selected government on notice to sort out the matter in the highest civilian forum of the country, parliament, is sufficient proof of this mood. That is the good part.

The case exposes the PTI government to be unprecedentedly incompetent and dangerously stupid.
It is bound to trigger some serious rethink in the Miltablishment about the quality, reliability and sustainability of such a sole political partner for the breadth of socio-economic transformation it has in mind. By dragging the army chief into the dock, yoking him with a six-month extension and compelling the brass to go back to the drawing board and war game the near political future, it has opened the floodgates of nasty debates and speculation about his person no less than his institution. The “same page” narrators must be seething with rage at the exposure of their hollow claims. This is also all for the good.

If truth be told, the judges could not, realistically speaking, have sent an army chief packing. Nor could they have ignored the blatant errors of omission and commission by the PTI government. They have done the next best thing: kept the ball in flight and kicked it in the direction of parliament where it belongs.

Two broad conflicts will open shortly. The first is legal. Does the order envisage a constitutional amendment or will a simple act of parliament suffice to resolve the matter? The debate will rage far and wide. The first requires a 2/3 majority in parliament which cannot be obtained without the support of the opposition. There’s no way the opposition can concede it without a big quid pro quo, as much from the PTI as from the Miltablishment, unless it is ready to commit political hara kiri exactly when it can smell its enemy’s blood. The other option will be challenged in parliament and in the courts again, making it a long drawn out and noisy affair that will keep everyone guessing while destabilizing economy and society.

The second is political. Resolving the matter in six months without the opposition’s agreement is going to be a tall order. If, as is likely, Imran Khan persists with his victimization campaign, the opposition will see the political wisdom of not succumbing to any Miltablishment pressure. This may provoke the Miltablishment to lose patience with Imran Khan and fall back on Plan B. If Nawaz Sharif’s recent “relief” case is an indication of the suspicions aroused in the PM’s camp, which led to tensions with the judges and Miltablishment, we can imagine a worse scenario in the near future.

While new confrontational fronts are going to open, we can be sure that existing ones will be accentuated as a perception grows that the PTI’s expiry date is nearing with the Miltablishment’s Khan romance on the wane. The foreign funding case is “open and shut”, and if the current Chief Justice of Pakistan doesn’t deliver justice, the next one is going to be under greater pressure to assert his honour. Similarly, the judges may drag their feet on the Musharraf case but the verdict cannot be sidestepped much longer. If the Miltablishment’s back is going to be scratched in one case, a balance is likely to be struck by spiking Imran Khan in the other.

Whichever way one looks at it, it will require a Herculean effort of stupidity by the combined opposition to fritter away the best opportunity to come their way in a long time to drive an irrevocable wedge between the PTI and Miltablishment. Either the Miltablishment can continue on a path with the PTI that has brought anguish and discredit to it or it can ditch it, making new allies and cutting its losses. Certainly, the current junta has lost face in the eyes of the people.

If Pakistan’s power-stakeholders are not to confirm the country’s “banana republic” status in a moment of national crisis, they should help restore law and democratic order under a competent consensus government.

https://www.thefridaytimes.com/new-crisis/

This terrorist again ... Only idiots give his words any weight! Exiled to London like that murderer Altaf, he keeps barking ..
 

BATMAN

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So this is what it comes to now Credible Sethi and Hamid Mir lefafa lol. Really hater of IK living in dream land.

Day after day, Week after week and month after month for end of PTI govt.
Nop... actually if you watch video, he is trying to build or showing way to IK how to build political alliance to get the desired amendments in law, which will give PM full control over army, as well.
 

Flight of falcon

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Nop... actually if you watch video, he is trying to build or showing way to IK how to build political alliance to get the desired amendments in law, which will give PM full control over army, as well.

After doing everything possible under the sun to hurt IK combined kanjars opposition has now decided to commit mass suicide to register their protest...... when asked to lead diesel claimed he is too fat and heavy to be hanged in public. He has suggested Bilawal’s name.
 

Jinn Baba

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Unless something drastically changes, I dont think this government is going anywhere.

In any case IMO they MUST complete their tenure! And at the end of it - the people (if there are free elections) can decide whether to keep them in power or bring someone else in.

The problem we have had in the past was that governments would not complete their full terms and then claim themselves to be victims or use that as an excuse to explain their failures. Look when PPP completed its term! And when N completed its term. If people voted PTI, then let them complete their term and then decide how good or bad they have been.
 

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