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Nasrin | The most important film you will watch this year

sammuel

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Nasrin | The most important film you will watch this year

channal24 Herman Eloff




In a documentary brilliantly crafted by Jeff Kaufman and Marcia Ross, the inspiring story of Nasrin Sotoudeh's fight for equality and her own freedom from an Iranian prison is bravely captured on film. News24's lifestyle editor Herman Eloff sits down with the filmmakers to discuss the making of the film.


This week marked the third year that human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh has been incarcerated as a political prisoner in the most dangerous and worst prison in Iran known for its inhumane medical and psychological conditions.

Surviving Covid-19, heart issues, and a 40-day hunger strike, her incredibly inspiring story of resilience and her fight for equal rights are bravely captured in the critically acclaimed documentary Nasrin.


Created by Jeff Kaufman and Marcia Ross and narrated by Academy Award-winning actor Olivia Colman, the must-see film is a harrowing tale that exposes the injustices Nasrin and many others have suffered in Iran.

Nasrin, often referred to as the Nelson Mandela of Iran, is one of the world's most courageous human rights lawyers and a leading figure in Iran's remarkably resilient women's rights movement.

The documentary - which was secretly filmed in Iran by men and women who risked arrest to get the footage out - includes interviews with acclaimed filmmaker Jafar Panahi, Nobel Peace laureate Shirin Ebadi, journalist Ann Curry, and Nasrin's husband and fellow-activist Reza Khandan.

Nasrin, who represented imprisoned Iranian opposition activists and politicians following the disputed June 2009 Iranian presidential elections, was first arrested in September 2010 and put in solitary confinement in Evin Prison. She was released in September 2013 after a worldwide campaign supported by Amnesty International.

In June 2018, she was imprisoned again. She is currently being held in Qarchak prison as an international #FreeNasrin campaign, supported by millions of people from over 200 nations, is putting pressure on the Iranian government to have her released.

"We heard from her husband a couple of times last week. It's been hard, but her spirit is strong," writer and director Jeff Kaufman tells me on Saturday evening via a Zoom call from Los Angeles. We are joined by his wife and fellow filmmaker, Marcia.



According to Jeff, Nasrin is living in horrible conditions in Qarchak, a women's prison east of Tehran in the desert: "It's so unsanitary. She almost instantly got Covid. So, she's been dealing with Covid and a heart condition. She was on short medical leave where she had an angioplasty. Just last week she released a public statement on behalf of another prisoner, which tells you a lot about her character. She's in a very small cell, crowded with other prisoners, with no windows, no ventilation, bad water, bad food, and a terrible smell. It's a crime."

Jeff and Nasrin's paths crossed in 2011 while working on the 30-minute documentary, Education Under Fire. The film spotlighted the persecution of the Baha'is of Iran, with a special focus on the at-risk Baha'i Institute for Higher Education (BIHE).

Many of the Baha'i Faith are arrested, tortured, and even executed in Iran if they refuse to recant their beliefs. In a poignant scene in the new documentary, Nasrin speaks of receiving an anonymous call from someone who demanded to know if she was Muslim or Baha'i. The simplest and safest answer would be to state that she is indeed Muslim, but Nasrin refuses to answer. Instead, she fearlessly opts to keep her religion private. She refuses to protect herself, knowing that there are people who aren't free to practise their religion.



Getting Olivia Colman on board as narrator

"Our commitment is to what Nasrin stands for, to telling her story, but now it's also to getting her out of prison. When we first reached out to Nasrin to do this film, she - as it's so common for her - said: 'Okay, but I really hope it's about others as well.' That was always our intent. So, whenever we talk about Nasrin, we remind people that in every country, there are people like Nasrin, and they all deserve our support," Jeff adds.

One of the biggest challenges that faced Jeff and Marcia was that they simply couldn't go to Iran themselves to film the documentary due to their previous work in exposing injustices in the country. "Even if we could have gone, it wouldn't be a great way to get the kind of access we wanted for this film," Jeff says, adding, "If we're walking around with an American film crew, you're going to get arrested, you're not going to get good footage. So, we were able to work with some remarkable individuals who put themselves at risk to make this film with Nasrin.

"We're just so grateful to what they did and their access. One person has since had to flee Iran, not because of our film but because of other work they've done in the past. It shows the pressure that people like that are put under. We want to honour what they did."

Although most of the film is in Farsi, letters and news articles highlighted throughout are narrated in English by The Crown actor Olivia Colman. Getting Colman on board was something both Jeff and Marcia really wanted to accomplish, and this in itself warranted some manoeuvring to make it all come together.

Marcia explains: "We had all these letters and poems, which was another element to film. We wanted to find somebody to do it who kind of embodied Nasrin. The right person who had the combination of strength and vulnerability and made that connection.

"In Jeff's homework, he found that Olivia had a history of human rights activism. We had initially approached her, but she was very busy. We looked into some other people, but we just decided to go back to her. I'm a casting director, so I know all these agents and these managers. I called her London agent. She's got an agent specifically for her voice work. Forty-eight hours later, they were like: 'Yeah, we just need to get her cleared from The Crown.'

"Jeff flew over there for literally a day to have three hours working with her in a studio. Honestly, she had been on vacation with her family, they had gotten back on Wednesday, she was doing this with Jeff on Thursday, she had fittings for the next season of The Crown, and she was going back to work on the following Monday. It was amazing. She was just incredible, and she so related to Nasrin."

According to Jeff, Olivia was wholly blown away by Nasrin's courage and tenacity in pursuing equality. "She just embodies something special that Nasrin has. Midway through the voiceover, she's in her booth, and the engineer and I are in the other room looking through the glass, and she's doing the read, and all of a sudden, she just slams down her fist and says: 'Damn this woman is amazing,' and she goes on," he says before adding with a smile: "And it wasn't the word 'damn' by the way."

As our call comes to an end, Jeff reveals that Nasrin managed to smuggle a letter to them a couple of years ago in which she thanked them for the work they had done. "In it, she said something like: 'We walk towards each other in freedom.' I love that idea of coming together across cultures, trying to find common ground and friendship.

"It's such a difficult world right now, and we see democracy at risk of slipping away in country after country after country. Especially when people have fought so hard for it in the first place. I think the inspiration of someone like Nasrin; it's not just about her, it becomes about something bigger.

"Nasrin's story, like all stories that are happening, is ongoing. We wanted to tell the story not just of her work and her arrest but how things carry on beyond that. We kept working on the film for another few months after her arrest and were able to incorporate some remarkable footage. The film ends, but the story doesn't end. The sequel is really what we all decide to make out of it."




~
 

SalarHaqq

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Raisi's democratic election is hurting that much? Hahahaha.

No Iranian user here is going to read this piece, let alone watch a zionist/western propaganda film on Iran packed with disinformation.
 

mohsen

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A spy is called political prisoner, I will wait for your next comedy movie to call ISIS and Al-Qaeda terrorists as freedom fighters!

Here is your script:
bin laden.jpg
 

mohsen

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Yesterday ISIS terrorist group (MOSAD freedom fighters) published a statement against Hamas and demanded uprising against them!

Idiots (in CIA and MOSAD) really think they can use this card forever!
 

sammuel

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Raisi's democratic election is hurting that much?

A brave woman , who scarified her freedom only to defend others ,is in some hellhole prison and this is the best you can come up with ?

But since you bring it up , was not this Raisi person , chief of justice ( yeh " justice " right ) , when Nasrin was serving time in prison.

I remember people where actually encouraged to write to him , in the hope he would release her when she got sick in prison :


Head of judiciary, Ebrahim Raisi
c/o H.E. Majid Takht Ravanchi
Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran
622 Third Avenue, 34th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Phone: 212 687-2020 I Fax: 212 867 7086
Email: iran@un.int
Twitter: @Iran_UN
Salutation: Dear Ambassador

SAMPLE LETTER

Dear Mr Ebrahim Raisi,

On 10 August 2020, unjustly jailed human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh, aged 57, began a hunger strike in protest at the Iranian authorities’ ongoing abuses in the criminal justice system. On 19 September 2020, Nasrin Sotoudeh, whose health deteriorated on hunger strike, was transferred to a hospital outside of prison. Reza Khandan, Nasrin Sotoudeh’s husband, said on Twitter at the time that she was in “dire health” and was suffering from an irregular heartbeat, low blood pressure, and shortness of breath making her unable to complete sentences. After she was transferred to Tehran’s Evin prison on 23 September, she communicated in a phone call that she needed a medical procedure on her heart according to doctors who treated her in the hospital outside prison. She is now held in the women’s ward quarantine section of Evin prison while on hunger strike, without the round-the-clock presence of health professionals monitoring her condition. Her transfer from hospital to the quarantine section of the prison raises serious concerns that she is not receiving the specialized medical care she requires. During her hospitalization, security forces barred her family from communicating with her and her family was not able to access her treating physicians or test results. Nasrin Sotodueh was sentenced to a total of 38 years and six months in prison and 148 lashes following two grossly unfair trials in 2016 and 2018 for her peaceful human rights work, including opposing Iran’s abusive, degrading and discriminatory forced veiling laws and the death penalty. In late March 2020, a prison official verbally told Nasrin Sotoudeh that she had been granted a pardon for the 2016 sentence, but she has not been formally notified in writing. If this pardon applies, under Iran’s sentencing guidelines, she must serve 12 years.

I urge you to release Nasrin Sotoudeh immediately and unconditionally as she is a prisoner of conscience, jailed solely for her peaceful human rights work. Pending her release, ensure that she is provided with the specialized health care she needs outside prison, in compliance with medical ethics, including the principles of confidentiality, autonomy and informed consent, and that she has family visits. I also urge you to ensure an end to state harassment and intimidation of her family.

Yours sincerely,

[YOUR NAME]


Same initiative was taken by the German lawyers association :


Chief Justice

Mr. Ebrahim Raisi

c/o Permanent Mission of Iran to the United Nations

Chemin du Petit-Saconnex 28 1209 Geneva

SWITZERLAND Berlin,

05.11.2020

Human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh

Dear Mr. Raisi,

I am turning to you to express my grave concern with regard to the life-threatening situation of imprisoned Iranian human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh.

The Bundesrechtsanwaltskammer (The German Federal Bar) represents the interests of the 28 German Bars and thus of the entire legal profession in the Federal Republic of Germany, which currently consists of approximately 166,000 lawyers, vis-à-vis authorities, courts and organisations – at national, European and international level.

As the presentative of the German legal profession, we are committed - also at the international level - to defending the independence of lawyers. This independence is the only way to guarantee that lawyers are able to fulfil their role on an equal footing alongside judges and public prosecutors in a State governed by the rule of law. Lawyers are indispensable organs of the proper administration of justice and they contribute to the realization of the rule of law. We pay particular attention to lawyers who are put in danger, who are constrained in the free exercise of their professional activities, who are threatened or persecuted, and who are exposed to repression going as far as imprisonment, because they are particularly committed to human rights.

Nasrin Sotoudeh is one of Iran’s most prominent human rights lawyers. She represented young people who were facing the death penalty, women, political prisoners and civil rights activists. She received numerous prizes, only recently she was awarded the Human Rights Prize of the Association of German Judges and the Alternative Nobel Prize.

For her activity as a lawyer and her tireless commitment to human rights, Nasrin Sotoudeh was again arrested and put in prison in 2018. She was sentenced to 38 years in prison and 148 lashes.

To draw attention to the spreading COVID-19 pandemic and the lack of safety measures to protect the prisoners, she went on a hunger strike on 10 August 2020.

On 19 September 2020, Nasrin Sotoudeh, suffering from a severe deterioration of her health during the hunger strike, was transferred from prison to a hospital. It has been reported that she requires medical treatment for a heart condition. Without granting such treatment, she was moved backed to Evin prison.

On 20 October 2020 she was asked to get ready for transfer to a hospital. However, she was not transported to a hospital, but to Shar-e Rey prison, also called Qarchak prison. Detention conditions in this prison are said to be even worse than in Evin prison. Placing Nasrin Sotoudeh in such unhygienic conditions without the necessary medical care means that she is deliberately exposed to the danger of death.

I am extremely concerned about Nasrin Sotoudeh’s health, in particular due to the fact that she is left at the mercy of the Coronavirus without defence.

I would urge you to release Nasrin Sotoudeh immediately and unconditionally. She is a political prisoner held in prison only because of her peaceful human rights work as a lawyer. In this context, I would like to refer to Article 16 of the UN Basic Principles on the Role of Lawyers (1990):

“Governments shall ensure that lawyers (a) are able to perform all of their professional functions without intimidation, hindrance, harassment or improper interference; … (c) shall not suffer, or be threatened with, prosecution or administrative, economic or other sanctions for any action taken in accordance with recognized professional duties, standards and ethics.”

Please make sure that up until her release she is given access to the urgent specialist medical treatment outside the prison. I would furthermore ask you to ensure that she is granted contact with her family and, lastly, to prevent any harassment or intimidation of her family by the authorities

Yours respectfully,


Yours respectfully,

Dr. Ulrich Wessel

Rechtsanwalt und Notar



 

SalarHaqq

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A brave woman , who scarified her freedom only to defend others ,is in some hellhole prison and this is the best you can come up with ?

But since you bring it up , was not this Raisi person , chief of justice ( yeh " justice " right ) , when Nasrin was serving time in prison.

I remember people where actually encouraged to write to him , in the hope he would release her when she got sick in prison :


Head of judiciary, Ebrahim Raisi
c/o H.E. Majid Takht Ravanchi
Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran
622 Third Avenue, 34th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Phone: 212 687-2020 I Fax: 212 867 7086
Email: iran@un.int
Twitter: @Iran_UN
Salutation: Dear Ambassador

SAMPLE LETTER

Dear Mr Ebrahim Raisi,

On 10 August 2020, unjustly jailed human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh, aged 57, began a hunger strike in protest at the Iranian authorities’ ongoing abuses in the criminal justice system. On 19 September 2020, Nasrin Sotoudeh, whose health deteriorated on hunger strike, was transferred to a hospital outside of prison. Reza Khandan, Nasrin Sotoudeh’s husband, said on Twitter at the time that she was in “dire health” and was suffering from an irregular heartbeat, low blood pressure, and shortness of breath making her unable to complete sentences. After she was transferred to Tehran’s Evin prison on 23 September, she communicated in a phone call that she needed a medical procedure on her heart according to doctors who treated her in the hospital outside prison. She is now held in the women’s ward quarantine section of Evin prison while on hunger strike, without the round-the-clock presence of health professionals monitoring her condition. Her transfer from hospital to the quarantine section of the prison raises serious concerns that she is not receiving the specialized medical care she requires. During her hospitalization, security forces barred her family from communicating with her and her family was not able to access her treating physicians or test results. Nasrin Sotodueh was sentenced to a total of 38 years and six months in prison and 148 lashes following two grossly unfair trials in 2016 and 2018 for her peaceful human rights work, including opposing Iran’s abusive, degrading and discriminatory forced veiling laws and the death penalty. In late March 2020, a prison official verbally told Nasrin Sotoudeh that she had been granted a pardon for the 2016 sentence, but she has not been formally notified in writing. If this pardon applies, under Iran’s sentencing guidelines, she must serve 12 years.

I urge you to release Nasrin Sotoudeh immediately and unconditionally as she is a prisoner of conscience, jailed solely for her peaceful human rights work. Pending her release, ensure that she is provided with the specialized health care she needs outside prison, in compliance with medical ethics, including the principles of confidentiality, autonomy and informed consent, and that she has family visits. I also urge you to ensure an end to state harassment and intimidation of her family.

Yours sincerely,

[YOUR NAME]


Same initiative was taken by the German lawyers association :


Chief Justice

Mr. Ebrahim Raisi

c/o Permanent Mission of Iran to the United Nations

Chemin du Petit-Saconnex 28 1209 Geneva

SWITZERLAND Berlin,

05.11.2020

Human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh

Dear Mr. Raisi,

I am turning to you to express my grave concern with regard to the life-threatening situation of imprisoned Iranian human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh.

The Bundesrechtsanwaltskammer (The German Federal Bar) represents the interests of the 28 German Bars and thus of the entire legal profession in the Federal Republic of Germany, which currently consists of approximately 166,000 lawyers, vis-à-vis authorities, courts and organisations – at national, European and international level.

As the presentative of the German legal profession, we are committed - also at the international level - to defending the independence of lawyers. This independence is the only way to guarantee that lawyers are able to fulfil their role on an equal footing alongside judges and public prosecutors in a State governed by the rule of law. Lawyers are indispensable organs of the proper administration of justice and they contribute to the realization of the rule of law. We pay particular attention to lawyers who are put in danger, who are constrained in the free exercise of their professional activities, who are threatened or persecuted, and who are exposed to repression going as far as imprisonment, because they are particularly committed to human rights.

Nasrin Sotoudeh is one of Iran’s most prominent human rights lawyers. She represented young people who were facing the death penalty, women, political prisoners and civil rights activists. She received numerous prizes, only recently she was awarded the Human Rights Prize of the Association of German Judges and the Alternative Nobel Prize.

For her activity as a lawyer and her tireless commitment to human rights, Nasrin Sotoudeh was again arrested and put in prison in 2018. She was sentenced to 38 years in prison and 148 lashes.

To draw attention to the spreading COVID-19 pandemic and the lack of safety measures to protect the prisoners, she went on a hunger strike on 10 August 2020.

On 19 September 2020, Nasrin Sotoudeh, suffering from a severe deterioration of her health during the hunger strike, was transferred from prison to a hospital. It has been reported that she requires medical treatment for a heart condition. Without granting such treatment, she was moved backed to Evin prison.

On 20 October 2020 she was asked to get ready for transfer to a hospital. However, she was not transported to a hospital, but to Shar-e Rey prison, also called Qarchak prison. Detention conditions in this prison are said to be even worse than in Evin prison. Placing Nasrin Sotoudeh in such unhygienic conditions without the necessary medical care means that she is deliberately exposed to the danger of death.

I am extremely concerned about Nasrin Sotoudeh’s health, in particular due to the fact that she is left at the mercy of the Coronavirus without defence.

I would urge you to release Nasrin Sotoudeh immediately and unconditionally. She is a political prisoner held in prison only because of her peaceful human rights work as a lawyer. In this context, I would like to refer to Article 16 of the UN Basic Principles on the Role of Lawyers (1990):

“Governments shall ensure that lawyers (a) are able to perform all of their professional functions without intimidation, hindrance, harassment or improper interference; … (c) shall not suffer, or be threatened with, prosecution or administrative, economic or other sanctions for any action taken in accordance with recognized professional duties, standards and ethics.”

Please make sure that up until her release she is given access to the urgent specialist medical treatment outside the prison. I would furthermore ask you to ensure that she is granted contact with her family and, lastly, to prevent any harassment or intimidation of her family by the authorities

Yours respectfully,


Yours respectfully,

Dr. Ulrich Wessel

Rechtsanwalt und Notar



Can anyone explain to me what this subject, who legitimizes violent physical attacks against Iranian citizens simply because they were trying to exercise their democratic right to vote at a presidential election; who applauds censorship against Iranian news outlets and against media that do not follow the zionist line against Iran; who is seeking to pass off spies as angelic journalists, is spamming the Iranian forum section for?

New guidelines, in reaction to president-elect Ebrahim Ra'isis phenomenal victory at the democratic election? No doubt, the apartheid regime in Tel Aviv, which came into being through ethnic "cleansing" and has since strived on continuous rights violations and war crimes, is definitely beyond desperate! Everyone here can sense it. How brilliantly its supporters are exposing their sentiments.
 
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mohsen

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So this woman is a spy now . Please enlighten us what top secret information , this woman has passed on ?




~
Not every spy steals the information. anybody who works with enemy intelligence services is a spy regardless of his/her role.

Under the cover of a lawyer and human right classes she was tasked to train the terrorists the techniques to deceive and escape the security and judiciary forces.

If I had any position in this country I would have executed her like the terrorists she was helping.
 

TheImmortal

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So this woman is a spy now . Please enlighten us what top secret information , this woman has passed on ?




~
You do realize the central importance of recruiting a spy is to pick someone who is unlikely to be suspected of spying?

I been to Iran many times and am dual citizen who has written about the Iranian government in both positive and negative light. Yet I am always treated with respect over there. I am sure intelligence services know who I am.

So the central motto here is if you get suspected of spying in Iran chances are you did do something to piss the intelligence services enough to apprehend you. They tolerate a decent amount of dissent.
 

sammuel

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Not every spy steals the information. anybody who works with enemy intelligence services is a spy regardless of his/her role.

Under the cover of a lawyer and human right classes she was tasked to train the terrorists the techniques to deceive and escape the security and judiciary forces.

If I had any position in this country I would have executed her like the terrorists she was helping.
You do realize the central importance of recruiting a spy is to pick someone who is unlikely to be suspected of spying?

I been to Iran many times and am dual citizen who has written about the Iranian government in both positive and negative light. Yet I am always treated with respect over there. I am sure intelligence services know who I am.

So the central motto here is if you get suspected of spying in Iran chances are you did do something to piss the intelligence services enough to apprehend you. They tolerate a decent amount of dissent.

It is sad to see people here are willing to condemn this woman without putting forward even a shred of evidence.

Falsely accusing someone of something he did not do is a terrible sin. Again and again the importance of fair trial was stressed out by all religions. No wonder it was included the 10 commandments.

The ninth commandment :

"Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour"

(Exodus 20:16)

Same principle in the Quran :

O you who believe, be persistently standing firm for Allah as witnesses in justice, and do not let the hatred of a people prevent you from being just. Be just, for that is nearer to righteousness. Fear Allah, for verily, Allah is aware of what you do.

Surat Al-Ma’idah 5:8

This woman was denied any shred of fair trial , no wonder non of you can put forward anything to support your claims against her , as she was trialed behind closed doors with no one to witness the unfair proceeding.

She was not even allowed a solicitor to represent her , so she was trialed and judged with out anyone representing her side , or speaking on her behalf.

Yet some here are bald enough to call that Justice ?


~
 
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mohsen

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It is sad to see people here are willing to condemn this woman without putting forward even a shred of evidence.

Falsely accusing someone of something he did not do is a terrible sin. Again and again the importance of fair trial was stressed out by all religions. No wonder it was included the 10 commandments.

The ninth commandment :

"Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour"

(Exodus 20:16)

Same principle in the Quran :

O you who believe, be persistently standing firm for Allah as witnesses in justice, and do not let the hatred of a people prevent you from being just. Be just, for that is nearer to righteousness. Fear Allah, for verily, Allah is aware of what you do.

Surat Al-Ma’idah 5:8

This woman was denied any shred of fair trial , no wonder non of you can put forward anything to support your claims against her , as she was trialed behind closed doors with no one to witness the unfair proceeding.

She was not even allowed a solicitor to represent her , so she was trialed and judged with out anyone representing her side , or speaking on her behalf.

Yet some here are bald enough to call that Justice ?


~
lol, evidences are discussed in the curt, not in a random forum. she had access to everything both in the curt and in the prison, lots of her husband's propaganda materials are creatd by her when she was in prison (such a brutal condition!) ,espionage related trials are always confidential.

It's funny how countries in which citizen of other countries are imprisoned without even a trial dare to talk about justice, perhaps you expect the Israeli style of justice in which Bulldozers run over women (Rachel Corrie), that must be the ultimate definition of justice!


For 7 crimes this woman was sentenced to overall 33 years of prison, but unfortunately, unlike western countries, Iran's law doesn't allow to sum the imprisonment years, instead the longest period which in this case was12 years is applied. really pity.
 

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