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N africa & Middle East :Is there a common thread?

third eye

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Seeing the events as they unfold in the Muslim countries in N Africa & Middle east one cannot but help wonder if there is a common thread running along all of them.

While the urge for democracy is understandable & quite natural considering how authoritarian the regimes that fell & those that will fall were / are. It does seem strange that these are happening in concert . What is not unusual that it has happened but what appears unusual is the concerted action across the nations ( & they are not small nation states ).

This speaks of a wider network that existed / exists which had done a great deal of home work behind the lines.

AQ seems the logical first choice upon whom the needle of suspicion moves to. These nations represent a fertile breeding ground upon which the ' yeast' can be applied to achieve rapid fermentation.

Next, these nations are astride the most important waterways of the world & their ' loss' can represent a major setback the world. Even in nations where Dictators have fallen there is no clear road map on what to expect next .Organizations like the Muslim Brotherhood may just be a front for AQ or groups with similar fundamentalist views & inclinations.

KSA may just be next followed by Syria & Jordan ? They all technically fit the bill for similar insurrections followed by religiously inclined regimes. The Army is holding out in Turkey but the simmerings have been visible for long. The division of Sudan may reduce its ' vulnerability' to similar ventures .

To me there is more than what meets the eye. Having been thwarted in Af and Pak not ' falling' to them as possibly planned the next option would logically be the Middle East and what better than these nations ?

Is there anything in common ?

Your views please.
 

third eye

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AT PENPOINT The ferment continues | Pakistan | News | Newspaper | Daily | English | Online

AT PENPOINT The ferment continues

Even before the trouble in Tunisia spread to Egypt, the worry was expressed that it would. And it did, leading to the exit from office of President Hosni Mubarak after almost 30 years in office. Once Mubarak fell, it was predicted that now the entire Arab world was destabilised. That no one expected the next on the list to be Muammar Gaddafi of Libya was not an extrapolation of the absence of the causes of disaffection, but was a backhanded compliment to the ferocity of his regime. Gaddafi was popular enough in Pakistan for this aspect of his rule to be ignored, but the fact is that the Libyan security forces have taken more lives in their attempt to keep him in office than have been killed in the rest of the Middle East, something which has prompted the Libyan Ambassador to India to resign.

The surprise at this revulsion by the Libyan people is also something of an error, because the country is flanked by Tunisia to its West and Egypt to its East, and thus was almost certain to end up in the same way. Add to that the factor of Gaddafi having been in office since 1969, and thus having presided over a generation of Libyans, and having moved from a youthful involvement with revolutionaries to a more staid relationship with the main customers of his country’s oil, from the Lockerbie bombings to his apology for them to the grand payout accompanying the apology he made, from the starting of a nuclear programme to handing it over to the USA, from the assistance to terrorists to helping the USA in its war on terror. He has already killed over 1,000 of his people to hold on to office, but even if he survives, it is probable that he will find his regime even more restricted than before.
If he falls, that will leave only Algeria and Morocco of the Maghreb with regimes still in place, though both countries have seen demonstrations. However, both have already had the rebellions quelled, though without any bloodshed. That implies that the protests have been purely imitative, but that would be to ignore that both countries are also suffering from the same problems that have caused rebellions elsewhere: food inflation, youth unemployment, corruption.

However, it must also be noted that the currents proceeding across the Arab world have not been analysed. First, it is not clear what the rebellions stand for. It is reasonably clear what they are against: the misrule they have suffered. There has been a labelling of these as ‘democratic’ revolutions, and a hasty denial of their having any Islamic content. There are two reasons for this. First, to speak of Islam is to raise Israeli hackles. Second, throughout the Arab world, the Islamic Brotherhood is seen as the main Islamist political force, and it has not had a major role in the actual prote[/B]sts (the regime in Egypt is talking to the Brotherhood because there was no one else to talk to).

It is possible to talk of the Arab world because of the remnants of Arab nationalism, something which Gaddafi tried to use in his early days, but which had much older roots, dating back to the 19th century, when the Arab world was firmly under Ottoman rule. Even though some of the Maghreb came under colonial rule in the 19th century, it was only with the fall of the Ottomans, and the end of the Caliphate, that the Arab lands of the Levant came under the League of Nations and became European Protectorates. That was when Libya became an Italian colony, for example. Apart from the abiding European interest in the Levant, the southern and eastern coasts of the Mediterranean were Arab, and thus of abiding interest to European powers trading to them, which meant that the UK got involved in a big way, especially after it took over Egypt because of the Suez Canal and the route it offered to India. It also took the Trucial States of the Gulf (now the UAE), as a colony after World War I and the collapse of the Ottomans. It was perhaps no coincidence that the USA got involved in the area then, and in the Arabian Peninsula, at this time, just as oil in this area began to grow important.
 

below_freezing

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If it's Al Qaeda, it's CIA too. Don't forget, Al Qaeda was a purely US creation, paid for and supported by the CIA. I think it's pure CIA. They're just changing the dictators, nothing to see here. Egypt will be a dictatorship within 3 months. Tunisia and Libya will follow. The difference is, Libya will be even more open to US oil companies. The big prize is Sudan, but the people of Sudan have taken a difficult choice: amputate the infected leg, and save the body.
 

Tractor

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If it's Al Qaeda, it's CIA too. Don't forget, Al Qaeda was a purely US creation, paid for and supported by the CIA. I think it's pure CIA. They're just changing the dictators, nothing to see here. Egypt will be a dictatorship within 3 months. Tunisia and Libya will follow. The difference is, Libya will be even more open to US oil companies. The big prize is Sudan, but the people of Sudan have taken a difficult choice: amputate the infected leg, and save the body.
The knowledge in last sentence you said learn from earthquake.
 

hembo

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If I were a conspiracy theorist, I would not rule out CIA role in the recent events..
 

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