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Mumtaz Qadri Hanged in Adiyala Jail

Musafir117

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Here's d "Minister of State for Religious Affairs" eulogizing #MumtazQadri ,hailed him a hero in his recent presser.
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MUmtaz Qadri lovers ?
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@MaarKhoor @Winchester @Irfan Baloch @Spring Onion @Shamain
Hang them too or dozen then see " the Followers " like punctured tube. Jail
 

Solomon2

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Thousands in Pakistan Attend Funeral of Convicted Murderer


People hold the photo of police officer Mumtaz Qadri, the convicted killer of a former governor, during his funeral, in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

Ayesha Tanzeem
March 01, 2016 11:53 AM

RAWALPINDI/ISLAMABAD —
Tens of thousands of people in Pakistan Tuesday attended the funeral of a man executed a day earlier for the killing in 2011 of a powerful politician who criticized the country's blasphemy laws.

Funeral prayers for Mumtaz Qadri were held in Rawalpindi’s Liaquat Bagh park, the same place where former prime minister Benazir Bhutto was assassinated in December 2007.

The crowd carried the body more than 20 kilometers to bury it in a place called Bhara Kahu, near Islamabad, the nation's capital. All roads leading to Islamabad were blocked for traffic with heavy shipping containers guarded by police in riot gear.

Schools and most marketplaces in Rawalpindi were closed for the day.

Earlier, the crowd chanted slogans in favor of Qadri and against the government and judiciary. His supporters hailed him as a hero and a defender of the faith.

The head of the Council of Islamic Ideology in Pakistan, Maulana Mohammad Shirani, however, said Monday that Qadri was punished for taking the law into his own hands.

“No one is above the law,” Shirani told journalists.

Anti-media sentiment seemed high among the crowd Tuesday, possibly due to muted coverage of protests over Qadri’s hanging.



A supporter of a religious political party holds a banner of convicted killer Mumtaz Qadri during a demonstration against Qadri's sentence, in Karachi, Pakistan, March 9, 2015.

Qadri supporters had beaten up some members of the media, including a Reuters cameraman, on Monday and smashed his equipment. Anticipating further violence directed toward them Tuesday, both local and foreign electronic media mostly stayed away from the funeral. No television cameras could be seen on site in a country where such crowds are usually covered live by multiple stations.

Qadri, who worked for the elite unit of the police and was on duty to guard the governor of Punjab province, Salman Taseer, shot him almost 30 times outside a popular market in Islamabad. When Qadri arrived at court to stand trial in Taseer's death, he was showered with rose petals by lawyers who offered to take his case for free.

Taseer was a vocal supporter of a Christian woman, Asia Bibi, who was accused of blasphemy. He wanted the country's blasphemy laws amended.

A few weeks after Taseer was killed, another politician, Minority Affairs Minister Shahbaz Bhatti, was gunned down. Bhatti also advocated reforming the blasphemy laws.

Human rights activists have long complained that the blasphemy laws are abused to settle personal scores or land disputes. People accused of blasphemy, they say, often do not get a fair trial because lower court judges are afraid to rule in their favor.

An accusation of blasphemy is considered a de-facto death sentence in Pakistan. At least 65 people have been murdered in connection with blasphemy allegations since 1990, according to the Center for Research and Security Studies and a tally by the Reuters news agency.

Qadri’s execution, however, shows the government is toughening its stance on hardliners carrying out vigilante justice.
 

IceCold

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Today during Jumma the imam masjid refered to him as Hazarat Mumtaz Qadri ramtulla and I was like wtf? Than after prayers during dawa he said us ka darjaat bulund hoon or huma be aisa logon main shamal hona ki taufeeq kera. I was literally what the hell are we doing. Most people were saying loud ameen over this. I sincerely believe no mullah should be allowed to become Imam Masjid and offer khutba without some sort of degree in Islam. These bull shitters are dividing an already divided nation and this would only bring more chaos and destruction to an already terrorised country
 

Raja.Pakistani

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Ye " molvie " meri jutte ki nokk pe hain " Tohin e Molvi is the big factor behind his murder, otherwise he repeatedly claim that he is in favor of re look in law as it using unfairly. Molvie was target him and find Qadri most suitable zombie to achieve the target.
Yes salman taseer was Gustakh e Molvi and did hurt the egos of movli so seem personal revenge..Its very irritating when people associate act of killing with love of Prophet Muhammad(PBUH)..no sane person has right to take the life of any individual in his personal capacity ..funny that he was appointed as protector of the guy whom he killed so he was not even loyal and honest to his job let alone with Islam..We have many illiterate mullah who lack reasoning and wisdom and they are the reason of incidents like this in our soceity

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Jungibaaz

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45 pages, and I've not made a comment on this matter on the forum, a fair bit of discussion with friend and family.
Just in case you were wondering, I'd say justice was served and he got what was coming to him.

I'm ready to move on, I suggest you all do too.
 

All-Green

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Hi,

The govt should take over.

Shrines are a highly successful business venture in our part of the world...

I do not think it shall be possible for the government to step in and stop people over visiting a grave or construction of a fully functional shrine...unfortunately this person has already become a holy avenger/saint to some.

There are graver threats at hand which demand swift action but are unchecked due to our government's political requirements severely denting the state's narrative and boundaries.
The government has been maintaining and communicating a very irresponsible/ambiguous stance on extremism in order to appease certain segments of their votebank/political leaders or seeking political regression of its opponents.

A case in point is the role of this government in supporting a fanatical cleric against a former dictator to seek sweet revenge...Pakistan be damned!
When we have a known terrorist sympathizer in the form of Maulana Abdul Aziz openly propagating anti State views from Islamabad with veiled/unveiled threats of terrorism as means to an end, surely we lack people who posses clear thinking and can take decisive action in time.
On the other hand we appoint and empower people like Rana Sanaullah, who see no evil in the largest province of Pakistan.

Only focus on education, social uplift, awareness through propagation of a clear state narrative and an effective targeting/political isolation of the extremist sympathizers can lead to a long term change.
 

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