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Muhammad Ali Jinnah - The Great Leader

ghazi52

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Muhammad Ali Jinnah
Did you know?

The New York Times listed Mr. Jinnah as 1946's best-dressed man in the British Empire.
Jinnah dressed himself perfectly, his elegant and magnificent personality gave him respect wherever he went. It is narrated that on visit to London for political meeting he stayed in hotel. In the morning, he descended from his hotel suite into the breakfast hall, using stairs. When the people present in the restaurant noticed him they all rose involuntary and stood up as a gesture of respect to him.

Jinnah was one of the New York Times best dressed men of 1946. Expressing his thoughts on Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Lord Wavell (Viceroy of India, 1943-1947) said, "Mr. Jinnah was one of the handsomest men I have ever seen; he combined the clear cut, almost Grecian features of the West with oriental grace and movement."

A research states that one of the main reasons why Muhammad Ali Jinnah is considered one of the most well dressed men in history has to do with the fact that he was a huge supporter and wearer of the well-tailored suit. Never one to sit back and wear whatever came through the door. It is said that before independence, Jinnah came to own over 200 suits, which he wore with heavily starched shirts with detachable collars. As a barrister, he never wore same silk tie twice. Even on his deathbed, he insisted to be formally dressed saying: "I will not travel in my pajamas."

Jinnah's outfits were always unique; he rarely appeared wearing the same thing more than once. In a time when poverty ran rampant, Jinnah was one of the few who was able to partake in the wondrous ways of fashion. Congratulations to Muhammad Ali Jinnah for being voted the Fifth Best-Dressed World Leader of all-time.

After meeting Jinnah at the Viceroy's dinner in Simla, a British general's wife wrote to her mother in England: "After dinner, I had Mr. Jinnah to talk to. He has a great personality. He talks the most beautiful English. He models his clothes and his manners on Du Maurier..., and his English on Burke's speeches. I have always wanted to meet him and now I had my wish."

His monocle, his double-breasted jackets, and his Craven "A" cigarettes gave his personality a unique style. He was fond of smoking expensive and finest 'Craven A cigarettes. He also smoked a special kind of 'Havana' cigars, and sometimes a pipe.

When Allama Inayatullah Khan Mashriqi, the founder of the Khaksar Movement, was released from a U.P. jail, the Quaid-i-Azam, on the advice of some of his friends, went to see him along with his colleagues. He was accompanied by Liaquat Ali Khan, Sir Abdullah Haroon and Pir Ali Mohammad Rashidi. In Qarul Bagh, Allama Mashriqi was staying in a huge tent in the middle of the Khaksar Camp. An ordinary dari had been spread on the floor inside the camp. There was no chair.

The Quaid-i-Azam was wearing a white suit of China silk. He was not in the habit of sitting on the ground. However, as there was no alternative, he sat down on the floor after shaking hands with Allama Mashriqi. The Quaid then took out his cigarette case and offered a cigarette to him. Allama took the cigarette and tried to give two paisas to the Quaid. The Quaid-i-Azam asked: What is this? Allama said: A Khaksar does not accept any thing without paying its price. On hearing this, the Quaid took back his cigarette from Allama and said: The price of my cigarette is much more than two paisas and I don't think you can afford it.

His monocle was a part of his majestic personality. In a court of law while making arguments, monocle, which Jinnah was using, for reading from his notes slipped from his eye and dropped on the floor. The magistrate mischievously grinned and felt delighted, anticipating that Jinnah would have to bend in his court to pick up the monocle. He was disappointed when Jinnah put his hand in his pocket, brought out another monocle, and applied it to his eye while continuing the arguments.

By the late 1930s, He was mostly seen wearing a 'Karakul' hat, also known as 'Jinnah Cap,' over his western clothing. The moment he became a leader of a Muslim country, he chose to wear a sherwani. He stopped wearing the UP and Delhi style chooridar or tight pyjamas, and preferred a loose fitting 'Shalwar' the Jinnah cap and white or cream colored sherwani become the trend of that time. Meanwhile, he wore suits for his day-to-day office work and on informal occasions.

The Quaid's magnificent personality traits left deep impact to everyone. Patrick Spens, the last Chief Justice of undivided India, paid the following tribute to Jinnah: "The tallness of the man, the immaculate manner in which he turned out, the beauty of his features and the extreme courtesy with which he treated all; no one could have made a more favorable impression than he did. There is no man or woman living who imputes anything against his honor or his honesty. He was the most outright person that I know."

The Quaid usually travelled by train during the pre-independence time. Journalist once confronted Jinnah with a question as to how Congress leadership travelled in third class like the working class while he enjoys the first class journey. Quaid's reply was sharp. He said that he travelled in first class but pays from his own pocket to buy the ticket, while the congress leaders travel in third class without ticket. It made headlines. Dear father of the nation you will be in our memories forever.

P. S: Please bear with me for making you read such a long write up on a person par excellence I have admired the most and adulated & emulated as my leader .. Mr Muhammad Ali Jinnah our Father of the Nation. I assure you his personality couldn't be described in fewer words than these. May his soul rest in peace, Ameen.



1627500873405.png
 

POPEYE-Sailor

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Muhammad Ali Jinnah
Did you know?

The New York Times listed Mr. Jinnah as 1946's best-dressed man in the British Empire.
Jinnah dressed himself perfectly, his elegant and magnificent personality gave him respect wherever he went. It is narrated that on visit to London for political meeting he stayed in hotel. In the morning, he descended from his hotel suite into the breakfast hall, using stairs. When the people present in the restaurant noticed him they all rose involuntary and stood up as a gesture of respect to him.

Jinnah was one of the New York Times best dressed men of 1946. Expressing his thoughts on Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Lord Wavell (Viceroy of India, 1943-1947) said, "Mr. Jinnah was one of the handsomest men I have ever seen; he combined the clear cut, almost Grecian features of the West with oriental grace and movement."

A research states that one of the main reasons why Muhammad Ali Jinnah is considered one of the most well dressed men in history has to do with the fact that he was a huge supporter and wearer of the well-tailored suit. Never one to sit back and wear whatever came through the door. It is said that before independence, Jinnah came to own over 200 suits, which he wore with heavily starched shirts with detachable collars. As a barrister, he never wore same silk tie twice. Even on his deathbed, he insisted to be formally dressed saying: "I will not travel in my pajamas."

Jinnah's outfits were always unique; he rarely appeared wearing the same thing more than once. In a time when poverty ran rampant, Jinnah was one of the few who was able to partake in the wondrous ways of fashion. Congratulations to Muhammad Ali Jinnah for being voted the Fifth Best-Dressed World Leader of all-time.

After meeting Jinnah at the Viceroy's dinner in Simla, a British general's wife wrote to her mother in England: "After dinner, I had Mr. Jinnah to talk to. He has a great personality. He talks the most beautiful English. He models his clothes and his manners on Du Maurier..., and his English on Burke's speeches. I have always wanted to meet him and now I had my wish."

His monocle, his double-breasted jackets, and his Craven "A" cigarettes gave his personality a unique style. He was fond of smoking expensive and finest 'Craven A cigarettes. He also smoked a special kind of 'Havana' cigars, and sometimes a pipe.

When Allama Inayatullah Khan Mashriqi, the founder of the Khaksar Movement, was released from a U.P. jail, the Quaid-i-Azam, on the advice of some of his friends, went to see him along with his colleagues. He was accompanied by Liaquat Ali Khan, Sir Abdullah Haroon and Pir Ali Mohammad Rashidi. In Qarul Bagh, Allama Mashriqi was staying in a huge tent in the middle of the Khaksar Camp. An ordinary dari had been spread on the floor inside the camp. There was no chair.

The Quaid-i-Azam was wearing a white suit of China silk. He was not in the habit of sitting on the ground. However, as there was no alternative, he sat down on the floor after shaking hands with Allama Mashriqi. The Quaid then took out his cigarette case and offered a cigarette to him. Allama took the cigarette and tried to give two paisas to the Quaid. The Quaid-i-Azam asked: What is this? Allama said: A Khaksar does not accept any thing without paying its price. On hearing this, the Quaid took back his cigarette from Allama and said: The price of my cigarette is much more than two paisas and I don't think you can afford it.

His monocle was a part of his majestic personality. In a court of law while making arguments, monocle, which Jinnah was using, for reading from his notes slipped from his eye and dropped on the floor. The magistrate mischievously grinned and felt delighted, anticipating that Jinnah would have to bend in his court to pick up the monocle. He was disappointed when Jinnah put his hand in his pocket, brought out another monocle, and applied it to his eye while continuing the arguments.

By the late 1930s, He was mostly seen wearing a 'Karakul' hat, also known as 'Jinnah Cap,' over his western clothing. The moment he became a leader of a Muslim country, he chose to wear a sherwani. He stopped wearing the UP and Delhi style chooridar or tight pyjamas, and preferred a loose fitting 'Shalwar' the Jinnah cap and white or cream colored sherwani become the trend of that time. Meanwhile, he wore suits for his day-to-day office work and on informal occasions.

The Quaid's magnificent personality traits left deep impact to everyone. Patrick Spens, the last Chief Justice of undivided India, paid the following tribute to Jinnah: "The tallness of the man, the immaculate manner in which he turned out, the beauty of his features and the extreme courtesy with which he treated all; no one could have made a more favorable impression than he did. There is no man or woman living who imputes anything against his honor or his honesty. He was the most outright person that I know."

The Quaid usually travelled by train during the pre-independence time. Journalist once confronted Jinnah with a question as to how Congress leadership travelled in third class like the working class while he enjoys the first class journey. Quaid's reply was sharp. He said that he travelled in first class but pays from his own pocket to buy the ticket, while the congress leaders travel in third class without ticket. It made headlines. Dear father of the nation you will be in our memories forever.

P. S: Please bear with me for making you read such a long write up on a person par excellence I have admired the most and adulated & emulated as my leader .. Mr Muhammad Ali Jinnah our Father of the Nation. I assure you his personality couldn't be described in fewer words than these. May his soul rest in peace, Ameen.



View attachment 765924
If u love this man u will cry after watch this video

 

WaqarZ

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Yes that's very nice dear, but Pakistan is about more than just any one man. We know all this history since childhood. In fact what to speak of Jinnah, Allah almighty had said about humankind's final prophet upon whom be peace: He is a prophet, like other before, and should he pass away will you wallow and turn, flee and stagnate in what you want to do?
 

krash

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"I was born plain Mr. Jinnah and I will die plain Mr. Jinnah".....little did you know Quaid-e-Azam.

Yes that's very nice dear, but Pakistan is about more than just any one man. We know all this history since childhood. In fact what to speak of Jinnah, Allah almighty had said about humankind's final prophet upon whom be peace: He is a prophet, like other before, and should he pass away will you wallow and turn, flee and stagnate in what you want to do?
What's your point?
 

Surya 1

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Muhammad Ali Jinnah
Did you know?

The New York Times listed Mr. Jinnah as 1946's best-dressed man in the British Empire.
Jinnah dressed himself perfectly, his elegant and magnificent personality gave him respect wherever he went. It is narrated that on visit to London for political meeting he stayed in hotel. In the morning, he descended from his hotel suite into the breakfast hall, using stairs. When the people present in the restaurant noticed him they all rose involuntary and stood up as a gesture of respect to him.

Jinnah was one of the New York Times best dressed men of 1946. Expressing his thoughts on Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Lord Wavell (Viceroy of India, 1943-1947) said, "Mr. Jinnah was one of the handsomest men I have ever seen; he combined the clear cut, almost Grecian features of the West with oriental grace and movement."

A research states that one of the main reasons why Muhammad Ali Jinnah is considered one of the most well dressed men in history has to do with the fact that he was a huge supporter and wearer of the well-tailored suit. Never one to sit back and wear whatever came through the door. It is said that before independence, Jinnah came to own over 200 suits, which he wore with heavily starched shirts with detachable collars. As a barrister, he never wore same silk tie twice. Even on his deathbed, he insisted to be formally dressed saying: "I will not travel in my pajamas."

Jinnah's outfits were always unique; he rarely appeared wearing the same thing more than once. In a time when poverty ran rampant, Jinnah was one of the few who was able to partake in the wondrous ways of fashion. Congratulations to Muhammad Ali Jinnah for being voted the Fifth Best-Dressed World Leader of all-time.

After meeting Jinnah at the Viceroy's dinner in Simla, a British general's wife wrote to her mother in England: "After dinner, I had Mr. Jinnah to talk to. He has a great personality. He talks the most beautiful English. He models his clothes and his manners on Du Maurier..., and his English on Burke's speeches. I have always wanted to meet him and now I had my wish."

His monocle, his double-breasted jackets, and his Craven "A" cigarettes gave his personality a unique style. He was fond of smoking expensive and finest 'Craven A cigarettes. He also smoked a special kind of 'Havana' cigars, and sometimes a pipe.

When Allama Inayatullah Khan Mashriqi, the founder of the Khaksar Movement, was released from a U.P. jail, the Quaid-i-Azam, on the advice of some of his friends, went to see him along with his colleagues. He was accompanied by Liaquat Ali Khan, Sir Abdullah Haroon and Pir Ali Mohammad Rashidi. In Qarul Bagh, Allama Mashriqi was staying in a huge tent in the middle of the Khaksar Camp. An ordinary dari had been spread on the floor inside the camp. There was no chair.

The Quaid-i-Azam was wearing a white suit of China silk. He was not in the habit of sitting on the ground. However, as there was no alternative, he sat down on the floor after shaking hands with Allama Mashriqi. The Quaid then took out his cigarette case and offered a cigarette to him. Allama took the cigarette and tried to give two paisas to the Quaid. The Quaid-i-Azam asked: What is this? Allama said: A Khaksar does not accept any thing without paying its price. On hearing this, the Quaid took back his cigarette from Allama and said: The price of my cigarette is much more than two paisas and I don't think you can afford it.

His monocle was a part of his majestic personality. In a court of law while making arguments, monocle, which Jinnah was using, for reading from his notes slipped from his eye and dropped on the floor. The magistrate mischievously grinned and felt delighted, anticipating that Jinnah would have to bend in his court to pick up the monocle. He was disappointed when Jinnah put his hand in his pocket, brought out another monocle, and applied it to his eye while continuing the arguments.

By the late 1930s, He was mostly seen wearing a 'Karakul' hat, also known as 'Jinnah Cap,' over his western clothing. The moment he became a leader of a Muslim country, he chose to wear a sherwani. He stopped wearing the UP and Delhi style chooridar or tight pyjamas, and preferred a loose fitting 'Shalwar' the Jinnah cap and white or cream colored sherwani become the trend of that time. Meanwhile, he wore suits for his day-to-day office work and on informal occasions.

The Quaid's magnificent personality traits left deep impact to everyone. Patrick Spens, the last Chief Justice of undivided India, paid the following tribute to Jinnah: "The tallness of the man, the immaculate manner in which he turned out, the beauty of his features and the extreme courtesy with which he treated all; no one could have made a more favorable impression than he did. There is no man or woman living who imputes anything against his honor or his honesty. He was the most outright person that I know."

The Quaid usually travelled by train during the pre-independence time. Journalist once confronted Jinnah with a question as to how Congress leadership travelled in third class like the working class while he enjoys the first class journey. Quaid's reply was sharp. He said that he travelled in first class but pays from his own pocket to buy the ticket, while the congress leaders travel in third class without ticket. It made headlines. Dear father of the nation you will be in our memories forever.

P. S: Please bear with me for making you read such a long write up on a person par excellence I have admired the most and adulated & emulated as my leader .. Mr Muhammad Ali Jinnah our Father of the Nation. I assure you his personality couldn't be described in fewer words than these. May his soul rest in peace, Ameen.



View attachment 765924
I read first three paragraphs in hope of knowing his great leadership quality. What I read was that he was very well dressed.
 

Rahil khan

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I read first three paragraphs in hope of knowing his great leadership quality. What I read was that he was very well dressed.
So you have got a problem with that ? If you wanna know about his leadership abilities, just a read a book of Jaswant Singh " Jinnah: India, Partition, Independence." You will have an idea that how Jinnah was demonized by Indian press in 1940s and how Nehru's contradictory approach resulted in division of India.
 

Surya 1

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So you have got a problem with that ? If you wanna know about his leadership abilities, just a read a book of Jaswant Singh " Jinnah: India, Partition, Independence." You will have an idea that how Jinnah was demonized by Indian press in 1940s and how Nehru's contradictory approach resulted in division of India.
I don't have any problem in accepting Jinha as a great leader He was from near my native place. However, to justify his leadership, if his well dressing is argued, it is a great injustices to him.
 

Myth_buster_1

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Muhammad Ali Jinnah
Did you know?

The New York Times listed Mr. Jinnah as 1946's best-dressed man in the British Empire.
Jinnah dressed himself perfectly, his elegant and magnificent personality gave him respect wherever he went. It is narrated that on visit to London for political meeting he stayed in hotel. In the morning, he descended from his hotel suite into the breakfast hall, using stairs. When the people present in the restaurant noticed him they all rose involuntary and stood up as a gesture of respect to him.

Jinnah was one of the New York Times best dressed men of 1946. Expressing his thoughts on Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Lord Wavell (Viceroy of India, 1943-1947) said, "Mr. Jinnah was one of the handsomest men I have ever seen; he combined the clear cut, almost Grecian features of the West with oriental grace and movement."

A research states that one of the main reasons why Muhammad Ali Jinnah is considered one of the most well dressed men in history has to do with the fact that he was a huge supporter and wearer of the well-tailored suit. Never one to sit back and wear whatever came through the door. It is said that before independence, Jinnah came to own over 200 suits, which he wore with heavily starched shirts with detachable collars. As a barrister, he never wore same silk tie twice. Even on his deathbed, he insisted to be formally dressed saying: "I will not travel in my pajamas."

Jinnah's outfits were always unique; he rarely appeared wearing the same thing more than once. In a time when poverty ran rampant, Jinnah was one of the few who was able to partake in the wondrous ways of fashion. Congratulations to Muhammad Ali Jinnah for being voted the Fifth Best-Dressed World Leader of all-time.

After meeting Jinnah at the Viceroy's dinner in Simla, a British general's wife wrote to her mother in England: "After dinner, I had Mr. Jinnah to talk to. He has a great personality. He talks the most beautiful English. He models his clothes and his manners on Du Maurier..., and his English on Burke's speeches. I have always wanted to meet him and now I had my wish."

His monocle, his double-breasted jackets, and his Craven "A" cigarettes gave his personality a unique style. He was fond of smoking expensive and finest 'Craven A cigarettes. He also smoked a special kind of 'Havana' cigars, and sometimes a pipe.

When Allama Inayatullah Khan Mashriqi, the founder of the Khaksar Movement, was released from a U.P. jail, the Quaid-i-Azam, on the advice of some of his friends, went to see him along with his colleagues. He was accompanied by Liaquat Ali Khan, Sir Abdullah Haroon and Pir Ali Mohammad Rashidi. In Qarul Bagh, Allama Mashriqi was staying in a huge tent in the middle of the Khaksar Camp. An ordinary dari had been spread on the floor inside the camp. There was no chair.

The Quaid-i-Azam was wearing a white suit of China silk. He was not in the habit of sitting on the ground. However, as there was no alternative, he sat down on the floor after shaking hands with Allama Mashriqi. The Quaid then took out his cigarette case and offered a cigarette to him. Allama took the cigarette and tried to give two paisas to the Quaid. The Quaid-i-Azam asked: What is this? Allama said: A Khaksar does not accept any thing without paying its price. On hearing this, the Quaid took back his cigarette from Allama and said: The price of my cigarette is much more than two paisas and I don't think you can afford it.

His monocle was a part of his majestic personality. In a court of law while making arguments, monocle, which Jinnah was using, for reading from his notes slipped from his eye and dropped on the floor. The magistrate mischievously grinned and felt delighted, anticipating that Jinnah would have to bend in his court to pick up the monocle. He was disappointed when Jinnah put his hand in his pocket, brought out another monocle, and applied it to his eye while continuing the arguments.

By the late 1930s, He was mostly seen wearing a 'Karakul' hat, also known as 'Jinnah Cap,' over his western clothing. The moment he became a leader of a Muslim country, he chose to wear a sherwani. He stopped wearing the UP and Delhi style chooridar or tight pyjamas, and preferred a loose fitting 'Shalwar' the Jinnah cap and white or cream colored sherwani become the trend of that time. Meanwhile, he wore suits for his day-to-day office work and on informal occasions.

The Quaid's magnificent personality traits left deep impact to everyone. Patrick Spens, the last Chief Justice of undivided India, paid the following tribute to Jinnah: "The tallness of the man, the immaculate manner in which he turned out, the beauty of his features and the extreme courtesy with which he treated all; no one could have made a more favorable impression than he did. There is no man or woman living who imputes anything against his honor or his honesty. He was the most outright person that I know."

The Quaid usually travelled by train during the pre-independence time. Journalist once confronted Jinnah with a question as to how Congress leadership travelled in third class like the working class while he enjoys the first class journey. Quaid's reply was sharp. He said that he travelled in first class but pays from his own pocket to buy the ticket, while the congress leaders travel in third class without ticket. It made headlines. Dear father of the nation you will be in our memories forever.

P. S: Please bear with me for making you read such a long write up on a person par excellence I have admired the most and adulated & emulated as my leader .. Mr Muhammad Ali Jinnah our Father of the Nation. I assure you his personality couldn't be described in fewer words than these. May his soul rest in peace, Ameen.



View attachment 765924
Why would pakistanis take pride in this?? This man was well dressed because he was pampered by british empire just like rest of elite muslims of brtish empire.
Unlike empires of the past, british empire used local leaders to work for british exit strategy.
In reality it was brtish empire who created pakistan just like they created india and rest of the nations that were once under its empire.
 

ghazi52

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Mohammed Ali Jinnah, also called Qaid-i-Azam (Arabic: “Great Leader”), (born December 25, 1876?, Karachi, India [now in Pakistan]—died September 11, 1948, Karachi), Indian Muslim politician, who was the founder and first governor-general (1947–48) of Pakistan.


Early years

Jinnah was the eldest of seven children of Jinnahbhai Poonja, a prosperous merchant, and his wife, Mithibai. His family was a member of the Khoja caste, Hindus who had converted to Islam centuries earlier and who were followers of the Aga Khan. There is some question about Jinnah’s date of birth: although he maintained that it was December 25, 1876, school records from Karachi (Pakistan) give a date of October 20, 1875.

After being taught at home, Jinnah was sent in 1887 to the Sind Madrasat al-Islam (now Sindh Madressatul Islam University) in Karachi. Later he attended the Christian Missionary Society High School (also in Karachi), where at the age of 16 he passed the matriculation examination of the University of Bombay (now University of Mumbai, in Mumbai, India). On the advice of an English friend, his father decided to send him to England to acquire business experience. Jinnah, however, had made up his mind to become a barrister. In keeping with the custom of the time, his parents arranged for an early marriage for him before he left for England.


In London he joined Lincoln’s Inn, one of the legal societies that prepared students for the bar. In 1895, at the age of 19, he was called to the bar. While in London Jinnah suffered two severe bereavements—the deaths of his wife and his mother. Nevertheless, he completed his formal studies and also made a study of the British political system, frequently visiting the House of Commons. He was greatly influenced by the liberalism of William E. Gladstone, who had become prime minister for the fourth time in 1892, the year of Jinnah’s arrival in London. Jinnah also took a keen interest in the affairs of India and in Indian students. When the Parsi leader Dadabhai Naoroji, a leading Indian nationalist, ran for the British Parliament, Jinnah and other Indian students worked day and night for him. Their efforts were crowned with success: Naoroji became the first Indian to sit in the House of Commons.When Jinnah returned to Karachi in 1896, he found that his father’s business had suffered losses and that he now had to depend on himself. He decided to start his legal practice in Bombay (now Mumbai), but it took him years of work to establish himself as a lawyer.


It was nearly 10 years later that he turned actively toward politics. A man without hobbies, he divided his interest between law and politics. Nor was he a religious zealot: he was a Muslim in a broad sense and had little to do with sects. His interest in women was also limited, to Rattenbai (Rutti)—the daughter of Sir Dinshaw Petit, a Bombay Parsi millionaire—whom he married in 1918 over tremendous opposition from her parents and others. The couple had one daughter, Dina, but the marriage proved an unhappy one, and Jinnah and Rutti soon separated. It was his sister Fatima who gave him solace and company.


Entry into politics

Jinnah first entered politics by participating in the 1906 session of the Indian National Congress (Congress Party) held at Calcutta (now Kolkata), in which the party began to split between those calling for dominion status and those advocating independence for India. Four years later he was elected to the Imperial Legislative Council—the beginning of a long and distinguished parliamentary career. In Bombay he came to know, among other important Congress Party personalities, Gopal Krishna Gokhale, the eminent Maratha leader. Greatly influenced by those nationalist politicians, Jinnah aspired during the early part of his political life to become “a Muslim Gokhale.” Admiration for British political institutions and an eagerness to raise the status of India in the international community and to develop a sense of Indian nationhood among the peoples of India were the chief elements of his politics. At that time, he still looked upon Muslim interests in the context of Indian nationalism.


But, by the beginning of the 20th century, the conviction had been growing among the Muslims that their interests demanded the preservation of their separate identity rather than amalgamation in the Indian nation that would for all practical purposes be Hindu. Largely to safeguard Muslim interests, the All-India Muslim League was founded in 1906. But Jinnah remained aloof from it. Only in 1913, when authoritatively assured that the league was as devoted as the Congress Party to the political emancipation of India, did Jinnah join the league. When the Indian Home Rule League was formed, he became its chief organizer in Bombay and was elected president of the Bombay branch.


Political unity

Jinnah’s endeavours to bring about the political union of Hindus and Muslims earned him the title of “the best ambassador of Hindu-Muslim unity,” an epithet coined by Gokhale. It was largely through his efforts that the Congress Party and the Muslim League began to hold their annual sessions jointly, to facilitate mutual consultation and participation. In 1915 the two organizations held their meetings in Bombay and in 1916 in Lucknow, where the Lucknow Pact was concluded. Under the terms of the pact, the two organizations put their seal to a scheme of constitutional reform that became their joint demand vis-à-vis the British government. There was a good deal of give and take, but the Muslims obtained one important concession in the shape of separate electorates, already conceded to them by the government in 1909 but hitherto resisted by Congress.


Meanwhile, a new force in Indian politics had appeared in the person of Mohandas (Mahatma) Gandhi. Both the Home Rule League and the Congress Party had come under his sway. Opposed to Gandhi’s noncooperation movement and his essentially Hindu approach to politics, Jinnah left both the league and the Congress Party in 1920. For a few years he kept himself aloof from the main political movements. He continued to be a firm believer in Hindu-Muslim unity and constitutional methods for the achievement of political ends. After his withdrawal from Congress, he used the Muslim League platform for the propagation of his views. But during the 1920s the Muslim League, and with it Jinnah, had been overshadowed by Congress and the religiously oriented Muslim Khilafat movement.


When the failure of the noncooperation movement and the emergence of Hindu revivalist movements led to antagonism and riots between Hindus and Muslims, the Muslim League began to lose strength and cohesion, and provincial Muslim leaders formed their own parties to serve their needs. Thus, Jinnah’s problem during the following years was to convert the Muslim League into an enlightened, unified political body prepared to cooperate with other organizations working for the good of India. In addition, he had to convince the Congress Party, as a prerequisite for political progress, of the necessity of settling the Hindu-Muslim conflict.


To bring about such a rapprochement was Jinnah’s chief purpose during the late 1920s and early 1930s. He worked toward this end within the legislative assembly, at the Round Table Conference in London (1930–32), and through his “14 points,” which included proposals for a federal form of government, greater rights for minorities, one-third representation for Muslims in the central legislature, separation of the predominantly Muslim Sindh region from the rest of the Bombay province, and introduction of reforms in the North-West Frontier Province. His failure to bring about even minor amendments in the Nehru Committee proposals (1928) over the question of separate electorates and reservation of seats for Muslims in the legislatures frustrated him. He found himself in a peculiar position at that time: many Muslims thought that he was too nationalistic in his policy and that Muslim interests were not safe in his hands, while the Congress Party would not even meet the moderate Muslim demands halfway. Indeed, the Muslim League was a house divided against itself.

The Punjab Muslim League repudiated Jinnah’s leadership and organized itself separately. In disgust, Jinnah decided to settle in England. From 1930 to 1935 he remained in London, devoting himself to practice before the Privy Council. But when constitutional changes were in the offing, he was persuaded to return home to head a reconstituted Muslim League.


Soon preparations started for the elections under the Government of India Act of 1935. Jinnah was still thinking in terms of cooperation between the Muslim League and the Hindu-controlled Congress Party and with coalition governments in the provinces. But the elections of 1937 proved to be a turning point in the relations between the two organizations. Congress obtained an absolute majority in six provinces, and the league did not do particularly well. The Congress Party decided not to include the league in the formation of provincial governments, and exclusive all-Congress governments were the result. Relations between Hindus and Muslims started to deteriorate, and soon Muslim discontent became boundless.


Creator of Pakistan

Jinnah had originally been dubious about the practicability of Pakistan, an idea that the poet and philosopher Sir Muhammad Iqbal had propounded to the Muslim League conference of 1930, but before long he became convinced that a Muslim homeland on the Indian subcontinent was the only way of safeguarding Muslim interests and the Muslim way of life. It was not religious persecution that he feared so much as the future exclusion of Muslims from all prospects of advancement within India, as soon as power became vested in the close-knit structure of Hindu social organization. To guard against that danger, he carried out a nationwide campaign to warn his coreligionists of the perils of their position, and he converted the Muslim League into a powerful instrument for unifying the Muslims into a nation.


Jinnah, Mohammed Ali


At that point, Jinnah emerged as the leader of a renascent Muslim nation. Events began to move fast. On March 22–23, 1940, in Lahore, the league adopted a resolution to form a separate Muslim state, Pakistan. The Pakistan idea was at first ridiculed and then tenaciously opposed by the Congress Party. But it captured the imagination of the Muslims. Pitted against Jinnah were many influential Hindus, including Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru. And the British government seemed to be intent on maintaining the political unity of the Indian subcontinent. But Jinnah led his movement with such skill and tenacity that ultimately both the Congress Party and the British government had no option but to agree to the partitioning of India. Pakistan thus emerged as an independent state in 1947.


Jinnah became the first head of the new state. Faced with the serious problems of a young country, he tackled Pakistan’s problems with authority. He was not regarded as merely the governor-general. He was revered as the father of the nation. He worked hard until overpowered by age and disease in Karachi, the place of his birth, in 1948.
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Stanley Wolpert, giving a speech in honour of Jinnah in 1998, deemed him Pakistan's greatest leader.

“Few individuals significantly alter the course of the history. Fewer still modify the map of the world. Hardly anyone can be credited with creating a nation-state. Muhammad Ali Jinnah did all three.”

(Stanley Wolpert)
 

El Sidd

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I don't have any problem in accepting Jinha as a great leader He was from near my native place. However, to justify his leadership, if his well dressing is argued, it is a great injustices to him.
It's how the Americans make life easier for themselves.

Naked Man versus Man in a Suit.

They still struggle to cloth Indians in their theaters.
 

ghazi52

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This picture seems to be that of the quaid’s arrival in Pakistan just before the transfer of power and at the airport. The people in the background seem to be welcoming him.


1627597419765.png
 

ghazi52

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Founder and the Governer-General of Pakistan Muhammad Ali Jinnah addressing at the opening ceremony of the State Bank of Pakistan.
Date: July 01 1948


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1627604395395.png


Zahid Hussain first Governor State Bank of Pakistan addressing at the occasion
 

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