• Thursday, December 12, 2019

Movies to watch out for, From Pakistan!

Discussion in 'General Photos & Multimedia' started by Umair Nawaz, Jan 13, 2014.

  1. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    Mansha strikes again in ‘Lal Kabootar’

    Mansha’s character, Aliya Malik, is strong-headed to the point of being stubborn but in the trailer we can see that she chooses to put up a fight even though her world has been turned upside down and her life could be in danger.

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    The trailer for Lal Kabootar - an upcoming film directed by Kamal Khan has just been released and it’s the only thing that we can talk about. The movie, which dabbles in a genre that is the first of its kind in the Pakistani film industry, is a suspense thriller starring Ahmed Ali Akbar and Mansha Pasha as the lead roles of the film.

    The two minute trailer is action packed and even though the trailer doesn’t give away too many details of the story line, it sparks an interest as soon as the first sentence is said: “Only fools think dreams can come true”.

    The trailer shows that Ahmed Ali Khan’s character is a taxi-driver looking for a way out of Karachi, and while realizing that he might have to compromise on his dream, he crosses paths with a strong-headed woman who is set in her ways, played by Mansha Pasha.
     
  2. Pak-Canuck

    Pak-Canuck FULL MEMBER

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    New PAF movie Sher Dil. Although it's another teaser it's much more detailed than the last one, seems to have a lot more dogfight action than "Parvaaz Hai Junoon"

     
  3. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    7 must-watch films that have returned to Pakistani cinemas

    After Bollywood films were pulled from cinemas, some Pakistani and Hollywood films are back to take their place

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    With the current tensions between Pakistan and India, local cinema owners have largely removed Bollywood films from their screens.

    As a result, many Pakistani and Hollywood films are getting some additional screen-time. And looking at the options that have returned, we don't mind at all!

    While films like Jurassic World 2, Azaadi and Furious 8 return in select spots, we went through the list and have picked out the films we're happy to see back on the silver screen and we feel you all should visit/revisit while you have the chance.

    1) Jawani Phir Nahi Aani 2


    The JPNA sequel reportedly broke all box office records when it first released, making it the highest grossing film of Pakistan. And we understand why! With non-problematic slapstick humour, the film asks you to suspend your disbelief so that you can get the most laughs out of it. Also, Fahad Mustafa does a great job in the film.

    2) Pinky Memsaab


    What really sets Pinky Memsaab apart is the absence of masala comedy or musical sequences. The Hajra Yamin-starrer is based on a simple idea about a maid living in Dubai who aspires to hold her own. The film is thankfully free of any cringe-worth silly antics to achieve that; instead, it makes an attempt to show the beauty of women supporting women.

    3) Spider-man: Into the Spiderverse


    Spiderverse has won multiple awards since its release in December with the latest being the Oscar and we see why. With beautiful visuals, a promising script and some of the most brilliant artwork ever to have hit the screen, the movie is a landmark film for animation. In many countries it has been on screens since its release and still is. Plus, it's Spider-Man, how can you resist that?

    4) Parwaaz Hai Junoon


    With a stellar cast and an homage to the Pakistan Air Force, PHJ combines romance, drama and tragedy with a sense of pride for the country and balances it all out with some very welcome comedy bits. We all enjoy a good laugh, don't we?

    5) Donkey King


    At this point, we can't tell whether The Donkey King has been brought back in the cinemas or was just on all along, but oh well. The film is one of Pakistan's finest works when it comes to animation and has been received positively with its audience. With cute characters and an unapologetic call out to the corruption within politics, the film is a fun watch and has something in it for everyone.

    6) Bohemian Rhapsody


    Bohemian Rhapsody has been described as a celebration of rock band Queen and is a must watch for any who love the band... and for those living under a rock and aren't familiar with the band's amazing work, it's a great introduction. Rami Malek has numerous accolades under his belt for his portrayal of Queen frontman and vocalist Freddie Mercury and for good reason.

    7) 3 Bahadur: Rise of the Warriors


    3 Bahadur is Pakistan's first 3D animated feature and that's a big milestone. Its third installment boasts a star-studded cast and a plot that children will enjoy, while having major improvements in story and animation as compared to its prequels. We don't have many movies catered directly to children, and for them to have a nice option that offers entertainment along with important social messages is a plus in our books.
     
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  4. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    Film Project Ghazi to be released on March 29

    March 03, 2019


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    Director Nadir Shah's new film "Project Ghazi" will now be released on 29th of this month, instead of 22nd.

    In a media interview, Nadir Shah said that the date has been changed as two Pakistani films Sherdil and Laal Kabooter are also scheduled for release on 22nd.
     
  5. Baby Leone

    Baby Leone SENIOR MEMBER

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    Mehwish Hayat's first look from upcoming film Chhalawa is out

    DESK REPORT

    Is this another runaway bride tale? We hope not


    Wajahat Rauf has kept his upcoming project quite hush-hush and so far we've only seen teasers of what's happening behind-the-scenes.

    In fact, the title of the film was released just a few weeks ago, and it's called Chhalawa. Now, we have a little something more to go by, Mehwish Hayat's first look as lead character Zoya is out and we've got only one question on our minds: is this another runaway bride tale?

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    We honestly hope not.

    Earlier this month, the team shared names of the cast in a short video.


    Announcing my 3rd film today. May Allah give us success, respect and a great reception by audiences throughout the world. @mehwishhayatofficial @zaranoorabbas.official @azfu @asadsidofficial @aashirwajahat @mohsin.jaaz @shaziawajahat

    A post shared by Wajahat Rauf (@wajahatraufofficial) on Mar 4, 2019 at 7:00pm PST



    Chhalawa will feature Azfar Rehman, Zara Noor Abbas, Asad Siddiqui, Mehmood Aslam and Aashir Wajahat, alongside Mehwish Hayat.

    The film will release on Eid ul Fitr.
     
  6. khanasifm

    khanasifm SENIOR MEMBER

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    Are these been released world wide ?? Or just locAl
     
  7. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    SPOTLIGHT: WINGS OF DESIRE
    Mohammad Kamran Jawaid
    March 17, 2019

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    Ahmed Ali Akbar in a still from Laal Kabootar - Photos: Anas Khan

    Even though I was an hour late, I feel I was still too early as I enter the 14th floor apartment with a small chalked blackboard that read ‘Laal Kabootar Meeting’.

    Entering the unfussily decorated space, I wave at a journalist friend who was in the midst of her interview with the film’s lead pair, Mansha Pasha and Ahmed Ali Akbar. At their backs, a full-sized rendition of the film’s title is oil-painted on the wall. The room is big, yet negligibly furnished, with only three small chairs and a poster of the film on a wall in the middle of the room.

    One corridor to the left, a small adjacent office space, is set up as a makeshift waiting area. A copy of Notes on Directing is deliberately laid on a tabletop near a small sofa; its pages yellowing and deliciously acidic (if you haven’t smelled or nibbled a good old book, you don’t know what you’re missing). A whiteboard with the film’s shot-list in coloured markers stands partially hidden behind a table. A paperback of the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo rests on top of three other books in the top-shelf of an open rack. These small, deliberately placed details fill in a lot of answers. I may be talking to a smart bunch who may know what they are talking about.

    The audience has high hopes from director Kamal Khan’s debut feature Laal Kabootar, lined up for release on March 22. Icon finds out what sets the film apart from this year’s other scheduled releases

    The apartment belongs to producers Hania and Kamil Chima, a Harvard-educated brother-sister duo who, inexplicably, pursued filmmaking. Their first film, Laal Kabootar, a thriller, is due out on the 22nd of this month.

    “It’s a desi, murder mystery, crime drama — an entry into Karachi’s darker side,” Kamil tells me as we start the interview.

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    The film is a desi murder mystery and crime drama


    “That still doesn’t tell me anything about the film,” I say.

    We laugh, as if that has really answered my question about the story.

    Opposite me sit Akbar, Pasha, and the two producers. Director Kamal Khan is out of Pakistan.

    Thrillers are a tricky genre, I tell them. The only moderately successful example I can think of was Jalaibee — a stylistic-made crime story that was all over the place storytelling-wise.

    As if things weren’t risky enough, Laal Kabootar recently debuted a Red Band trailer, where expletives run hand-in-hand with subtle insinuations. In one shot, Akbar’s character is seen lying in bed with a woman.

    “I don’t think the two characters were married,” I ask?

    The right casting also made a world of a difference in shaping the story, I’m told. “When the actors came in, the black-and-white turned to technicolor. When Ahmed auditioned, we literally saw the film take life,” Kamil adds. Unlike other film actors, Ahmed auditioned for the role, despite knowing Kamal for the past few years.

    “We’ve cut some elements of the film down, and bleeped swearwords,” says Kamil, explaining that the Sindh Board of Film Censors gave them an unrestricted rating.

    By unrestricted, I am assuming a PG-13 (or equivalent rating). Anything higher, and the film loses a bigger chunk of its business. In an environment where footfalls are already lower than usual, releasing a niche genre film is a risky enough decision as it is.

    “You don’t have to be too explicit to be explicit,” says Pasha. “It’s there, but it’s too nuanced to be immediately noticeable.”

    Kamil and Hania didn’t start the project with the intention of it being too brainy for the masses. “When we were starting off, laying the foundation, we asked ourselves this: if we look back at the last 100 years of cinema, what would be the one thing that is most marketable, or sure-shot sellable to the audience,” Kamil asks.

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    Ahmed Ali Akbar with his female co-star Mansha Pasha


    “Is it CGI, which is a recent invention? Colour grading? No. The answer is: a good story. So, we chased down the story. To make it the best it can be. We didn’t care whether my ego was being hurt, or that ideas were being rejected. Whatever it took, we were open to it. We wanted to tell this story the best way it can be told.”

    Apart from Ali Abbas Naqvi, the screenwriter, the producers had set up a writer’s table, I’m told.

    “I think this film’s development was an evolutionary process,” Kamil continues. “It started when Hania and I came up with the concept, which we brought to Kamal, who took it in a completely different direction. Then we brought in writers, and each new writer would bring their own flavor.”

    The storytelling wasn’t a piece of cake, I’m led to believe. “Every now and then we would hit a wall,” Kamil explained. “For example, we were mostly men writing a female character — Mansha’s character. I realised, that, say, if we were writing an action scene between two men, I would unconsciously have the female character stand on the other side of the room, scared. This wouldn’t be right. I haven’t seen a single woman who would do that. If we had a man in that scene, and not a woman, would he be standing scared like the woman?” he asks.

    The right casting also made a world of a difference in shaping the story, I’m told. “When the actors came in, the black-and-white turned to technicolor. When Ahmed auditioned, we literally saw the film take life,” Kamil adds. Unlike other film actors, Ahmed auditioned for the role, despite knowing Kamal for the past few years.

    “I believe in auditions,” Ahmed says. “It’s healthy for the industry and it’s good for the actor. It lets you know where you stand. It keeps you grounded.

    As far as Pakistani cinema is concerned, everybody wants to make things look pretty, and we’re running into the opposite direction,” says Pasha. “So, we made it look as grungy as possible. Sometimes, Kamal came to me and said, you look pretty. Often he would be kum karo apna make-up [tone down your make-up], it shouldn’t look like we’re trying to make you look pretty.”

    “I was actually rejected for the parts I auditioned for,” Ahmed says. “An established actor wouldn’t be saying that out loud, but when I saw the film, I was like, sahi kara, bilkul theek tha [they were right in not choosing me] — I didn’t fit that role.”

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    “There are so many things you add to the character as the actor and character evolve from paper,” Ahmed says of his journey with his role


    “His audition started when he opened the gate, he was instantly in character,” says Hania. It was, apparently, an amusing experience — one they have contemplated about releasing as a blooper reel once the film comes out.

    “Kamal actually stifled a laugh when I came in,” Ahmed fills in, “but he didn’t cut.

    “There are so many things you add to the character as the actor and character evolve from paper,” Ahmed says of his journey with the character. “Whether it’s the addition of a baali [earring], or the sort of shoes you wear, the moustache, or the jacket, or the walk. Things get plugged in that contribute to the overall personality.”

    Unlike Ahmed, Pasha hadn’t met Kamal before she was contacted for the role, but she did know of him. “I had seen a music video of his, and felt that this man was a visionary.”

    Pasha is referring to The Desert Journey by the music band D/A Method, which came out in 2016; the seven-minute single-take music video was more or less a showcase of the director and his team (Naqvi, was, again, the screenwriter and assistant director, and Mo Azmi, Laal Kabootar’s DoP, also shot that video). The video starred her friend, Suhaee Abro, recalls Pasha, saying she was a bit jealous of Abro at the time.

    [​IMG]
    Shamim Hilali and Mansha Pasha


    “When Kamal called me up for Laal Kabootar, I instantly asked: ‘What’s the role?’ ” she laughs. She plays a desperate woman caught in desperate circumstances.

    “Personally, whenever I tried to play it safe, I’d fail. Whenever I threw myself in the deep end, even in my personal life, I’d come out on top,” Pasha tells me.

    She was smitten by the story in an instant. “When girls start a relationship, they immediately start planning the wedding. That happens to me at work. I begin imagining that I’m at the premiere.”

    Without giving anything away, I’m told that the script was amended during production. “In fact, it was being amended right down to when we were editing. The story didn’t change, but the order of scenes did,” Hania explains. “It’s not as much about the scenes as it is about the delivery,” interjects Pasha. “Even within one scene, the way you say every line will change the meaning of the scene.”

    Pasha elucidates her point by saying ‘Kya kar rahay ho?’ [What are you doing?] in three variants, in a single breath.

    “After rehearsing a scene six times, when we would come to set the next day, the delivery would change completely. ‘You’re not doing that anymore’, Kamal would say. ‘Aisa to karna hi nahi hai [That’s not how it’s supposed to be at all]’, and I would have to completely realign myself to the situation.”

    Even though Kamal wasn’t in the room, the ensuing conversation with the actors is more insightful about the director than a one-on-one interview with him.

    “There is a scene where I would get smacked across the face,” Ahmed recalls. “Without telling me, Kamal tells the other actor to hit me as hard as he can, and my face literally spun towards the camera. The reaction I gave was genuine.”

    Was Kamal dependent on Mo Azmi (the cinematographer), I enquire? The cinematographer, whose credits include O21 and Cake is notorious for his resoluteness on set.

    “It depended on the scene”, Ahmed fills in. “After we would fine-tune the scene, Kamal would bring in Mo Azmi and ask him how he would shoot it.”

    “Mo would see what you’re wearing, and then change the lighting [or maybe] break the outfit by suggesting additions, such as wearing a scarf,” Pasha interjects.

    [​IMG]
    Ahmed plays a guy who is desperate and wants escape


    Often a cinematographer is responsible for the look-development of a film. Isn’t Laal Kabootar’s red colour grade a bit too clichéd, I ask? The palette bears an uncanny similarity to Cake and The Desert Journey. Kamil tells me that the final grade isn’t finished yet. However, he tells me that the murky tone has a philosophy behind it. “The moment you enter the cinema, we want you to be completely immersed in that world and with the characters. You should believe that Ahmed is not Ahmed. He is the guy who is desperate. He wants to escape. And you should connect to that plight. There should be no distraction from that. We chose to go to the underbelly, seeking character. So, even within the city, we tried to make those particular choices.”

    “As far as Pakistani cinema is concerned, everybody wants to make things look pretty, and we’re running in the opposite direction,” says Pasha. “So, we made it look as grungy as possible. Sometimes, Kamal came to me and said, you look pretty — and I was like, ‘Thank you Kamal. Aik scene mein acchi lag rahi hoon [I, at least, look beautiful in one scene]’. Often he would be ‘Kum karo apna make-up [Tone down your make-up], it shouldn’t look like we’re trying to make you look pretty.’

    “You would see each and every pore in our faces. There is no airbrushing — my nostrils look more flared than usual,” she says, pointing at the big poster behind her.

    Looking at the everyday shalwar kameez her character wears in the poster, I suppose they saved a lot on costume design. “It’s more expensive to dress down,” Hania replies. “You have to buy new clothes, but then you would make it look old by throwing dirt on it.”

    Getting the topic back on track, Ahmed says that the production design plays a vital role in the production. “You would see my character’s background by looking at where he lives. You might not immediately pick it up, but there is thought put in it,” he says. “You’ll see his history with the props that are in the scene. With the posters. Things that might not be revealed to the audience. The sewing machine that we placed in the corner has history. The film doesn’t show his mum, so the sewing machine alludes to the fact that she used to sew clothes for a living. The picture he picks up in one shot has a story. You might not even see who the picture is of,” he explains of the film’s ambiguity.

    “Things like the picture aren’t relevant to the audience, but they are for the character,” Kamil says.

    At that moment, I recall the room I was waiting in before the interview. Of things placed round the room which, subconsciously, tell you everything without giving anything away.
     
  8. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    Bilal Abbas Khan's telefilm about Pakistan Navy gets a teaser


    Film Laal will show the journey of a fisherman's son joining the navy

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    We've just got a first look at Bilal Abbas Khan in his role as navy officer in upcoming telefilm Laal!

    In the telefilm's first teaser, we see a prologue to Khan's life and how his character will come into joining the navy.



    The teaser shows the childhood of Khan's character, a fisherman's son who wants more from life, despite being forbidden by his father, played by Saleem Mairaj, to do so. We have to say, the child actor in this film has already won our hearts with his acting skills and we're looking forward to seeing more of him in the film already.

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    We get just a glimpse of Bilal Abbas Khan in the teaser so far. The film also stars Gohar Rasheed and Kubra Khan but they don't appear in the teaser.
    .
    Laal is written by Umera Ahmed and directed by Haseeb Hasan.
     
  9. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    [​IMG]



    The most recent release in this genre is Sherdil, which has been in the limelight for a while now, mainly due to Pak-India tensions and the skyrocketing patriotism experienced by the country over the past month.


    Patriotic films have managed to do well at the box office of late. Most recently, Parwaaz Hai Junoon came out last year and fared quite well. In fact, some theatres are still playing it, which obviously suggests that audiences are enjoying this genre.

    The most recent release in this genre is Sherdil, which has been in the limelight for a while now, mainly due to Pak-India tensions and the skyrocketing patriotism experienced by the country over the past month.
     
  10. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    Telenor Pakistan has announced its partnership with Netflix, the world’s leading internet entertainment service. As part of this partnership, Telenor postpaid and corporate customers in Pakistan will be able to add their Netflix subscription fee to their monthly mobile bill, eliminating the need to share additional credit card or debit card details. New and existing Netflix subscribers in Pakistan will be able to select the option to pay through their Telenor mobile bills from the payments page of Netflix. They can simply complete this process by entering their Telenor mobile number, followed by the OTP (one time password). “Leading Pakistan’s digital transformation, we are always on the lookout for innovative ways to integrate solutions and maximize utility for our customers,” said Sardar Abubakr, Chief Digital & Strategy Officer at Telenor Pakistan.
     
  11. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    Chhalawa teaser promises shaadi festivities and lots of drama


    Won't lie, we're getting some 'Punjab Nahi Jaungi' vibes here

    [​IMG]


    Wajahat Rauf has kept details of his upcoming movie Chhalawa tightly under wraps but now we can speculate on what it's all about.

    The film's teaser just dropped and while we're getting some major Punjab Nahi Jaungi vibes, we're also intrigued.



    The teaser is bright and colourful, showing wedding festivities that will take place in the movie. While we're still not certain about the plot of the film, we do see Azfar Rehman in love with Mehwish Hayat and troubles coming his way. What causes Mehwish's character to be heartbroken in full bridal get up? We shall have to wait and see.

    The film also stars Zara Noor Abbasi, Asad Siddiqui and Mehmood Aslam.

    Chhalawa releases this Eid-ul-Fitr.
     
  12. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    Sherdil fares better than Laal Kabootar at the Pakistani box office


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    Two Pakistani films Sherdil and Laal Kabootar faced off in the cinemas this week, and predictably the patriotic air force film starring Mikaal Zulfikar and Hassan Niazi is ruling the box office.

    Box office portal EntertainmentPk puts Sherdil earnings from Friday, March 22 to Wednesday, March 27 at Rs5.63 crores while Laal Kabootar trailed behind at Rs 1.16crores.

    Speaking to Images, producer Nomaan Khan estimates that the film had crossed Rs6 crores by Thursday. Cinema owner Nadeem Mandviwalla noted that the film "has taken a wonderful start for a non-holiday release and is the highest grosser of 2019 so far".

    When asked how he expects Sherdil to fare with the release of Project Ghazi today, Nomaan Khan appeared unperturbed. "I welcome Project Ghazi and wish it all the success. If any Pakistani film does well, I understand that it means one more cinema."

    "[As far as Sherdil is concerned], we hope to do even better in this week because the word has been spread far and wide. Even now, I've been told that the film is enjoying 80% occupancy in its screens when it typically drops down to 40% in the first week."

    As for Laal Kabootar, producers Hania and Kamil Chima say they're proud of their film generating positive word of mouth, "As a small film the strongest marketing tool at our behest is actually our customer. People walking out of the cinema after watching our film have been highly recommending it to friends and family, be it on social media or otherwise. Where other films can spend big on marketing, our focus has been on presenting a product that markets itself. Our box office has shown very stable numbers over the course of the first week. And so we are excited to move into the second week to see how well we continue to perform."

    About their upcoming competitor Project Ghazi, they said, "We are quite hopeful that Project Ghazi will bring in a fresh batch of people to the cinema this week and keep the cinema going culture alive. Because without footfall all films will suffer."
     
  13. HammerHead081

    HammerHead081 FULL MEMBER

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    Sherdil reviewed by this guy: https://old.reddit.com/r/chutyapa/comments/b6l79o/ziaulhaq_was_right/

    He said it was horrible.
     
  14. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    Galaxy of Pakistani Singers in 1980's

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  15. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    First look of Chhalawa hints at a family entertainer



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    Writer, director and producer Wajahat Rauf’s third film under his banner – Showcase Films – Chhalawa is all set to release on Eid ul Fitr this year alongside Heer Maan Ja. The first look of the film is out and suggests that the production is going to be a family entertainer. “A family, comedy-romance,” as Wajahat put it in an earlier interview with Instep.

    Featuring Mehwish Hayat, Azfar Rehman, Zara Noor Abbas Siddiqui, Asad Siddiqui, Mehmood Aslam and Ashir Wajahat in key roles, the first look teaser is vibrant and layered. It’s a wedding setting in a big house with all family members in presence. However, there is a twist to it. The premise suggests that though the occasion is of Mehwish Hayat’s wedding to another man, she isn’t happy with it. Her love interest, essayed by Azfar Rehman, is also there to win her father’s heart. This certainly reminds us of SRK in Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (DDLJ) as Mehwish says to Azfar when the teaser opens, “I will slap you so hard that the entire Shah Rukh Khan in you will come out.”

    There is music, dance, drama, romance and comedy, and then there is action – making the film a complete entertainment package. Mehwish and Azfar look good together onscreen (the two starred in Wajahat’s first web series Enaaya as well) while off-screen couple Zara and Asad, who are paired in the film as well, share good chemistry too. Zara appears as a cheerful young woman and steals the show in certain scenes, suggesting that she will be seen in a completely different avatar as compared to her small screen roles.