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Movement against rogue establishment!

jamahir

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Rogue establishment conspired to assasinate former prime minister Imran Khan. Only happens in Banana republics.

Chilean president Salvador Allende dies in coup in 1973.
Mursi was killed by Egyptian army under Sisi.

Bhai jaan, please think before equating events. Salvador Allende was a Socialist belonging to the Socialist Party of Chile and was assassinated by CIA because he was a Socialist.

OTOH, Morsi was a mullah belonging to the so-called Muslim Brotherhood and was supported supremely by CIA and NATO. As with any mullah group Morsi was installed into presidency by NATO but millions of people of Egypt rose up against his criminal enterprise, the so-called Muslim Brotherhood, and through al-Sisi they removed him and declared the "M"B as a terrorist organization and it was banned. The "M"B in 1954 tried to assassinate the great Socialist leader of Egypt and the Muslims and generally an inspiration for the world's progressives, Jamal Abdul Nasser, and for that the group's leader Sayyid Qutb was executed later. Nasser said this of the so-called Muslim Brotherhood :
CAIRO – 23 July 2018: Jinx! Gamal Abdel Nasser is not here today to say this term to President Sisi in order to prevent bad luck. It is easy for someone who is used to listening to the current leadership’s statements and Abdel Nasser’s statements as well to know that they sound exactly the same.

13 years after the success of July 23 revolution, which abolished the monarchy, late President Nasser, one of the revolution’s top leaders, described Muslim Brotherhood in one of his speech as people who exploit religion to obtain people’s support and seize power.

“The parties were dissolved, and we clashed with the Muslim Brotherhood party, during the four years, in 1953 and in 1954 … We were embroiled in dispute, they declared war against us, and they shot at me on October, 26, 1954 in Alexandria … Terrorist members in the Muslim Brotherhood party were arrested, and they were judged,” Nasser said during the statement.

“In 1954, we were negotiating with the British [forces occupying Egypt at the time] for the evacuation [deal]. At the same time, the Muslim Brotherhood members were holding secret meetings with the members of the British Embassy. They were telling them: we will be able to seize power,” Nasser said.

The late President said that the Muslim Brotherhood party has never held the patriotic feelings which Egyptians have held, adding: “The Supreme Guide of the Muslim Brotherhood at the time when we were fighting in the Canal was asked: what is your stance on the war in the canal. He said: We are a wide (international) call. Perhaps the war in the canal comes for your benefit here in Egypt, while we think it is beneficial to fight in another country.”

“This is the call of the Muslim Brotherhood. All of [their] speech is full of deception and [exploitation of] religion,” Nasser stated.

Similar to what happened following 2011 revolution when people decided to reconcile with the Muslim Brotherhood, perhaps because the youth who led the January revolution were not familiar with the MB policies, Abdel Nasser said he reconciled with the MB members, explaining that the reconciliation however, failed to turn them into good citizens.

“In 1953, we actually and honestly wanted to cooperate with the Muslim Brotherhood supposing that [this will make its members] take the right path. I met with the General guide of the Muslim Brotherhood. He issued [some] demands,” Nasser said.

The late President said that the MB guide asked him to force Egyptian women to wear Islamic veil and to shut cinemas and theaters.

Nasser said: “He told me that you as a ruler is responsible [for veiling women]. I told him, you have a daughter in the Faculty of Medicine who is unveiled. Why didn’t you force her to wear a veil? If you are not able to make your daughter wear a veil, [how] would you want me to [force] 10 million women to wear veils in the country?”

“Then, [he told me] that women must not [go to] work. I think that when a woman works, we are protecting her [this way]. Why do [some women] go astray? They do so because of the need and poverty. We all know such stories of women whose sons or mothers are sick and they did not find money, so they were forced to sell their bodies. Therefore, work is a protection for women, while preventing women from work [works] against her. We actually liberate women by [allowing] them to work and cooperate with the man,” Nasser added.

“Last year, in 1964, before the constitution, I released them all from the prison, and we issued a law to return every one of them to his work with the same salary and promotion prospects. In 1965, we seized the new conspiracy of the Muslim Brotherhood; secret system, and assassination and destruction plans,” the late President said.

Nasser said that Muslim Brotherhood group says that all the [Egyptian] people are disbelievers, and that the MB members are the only Muslims. According to Nasser, The MB members say they refuse people representation, and the Parliament. He added that the MB group considers the kings and presidents of the Arab and other countries as disbelievers, and that the MB members are the only Muslim people.

“They were arrested, and we also arrested all old MB organizations … It is not about the assassination of Gamal Abdel Nasser. If Abdel Nasser was assassinated, a thousand people similar to Gamal Abdel Nasser would emerge, but we can never accept that [our] people be assassinated,” Nasser stated.

“We started to view [their cases]; all people who participated in these secret organizations will be referred to judgment. All dangerous people who we released in 1964 and had basically represented heads or dangerous members in the secret organizations will be [imprisoned]. After that, the rest of [the MB group members] will be released. We will give them another chance. If somebody of them [commits similar illegal actions] we will arrest him and we will never get him out of prison.”

“It is enough. We cannot take a gamble on the rewards we achieved during the 13 past years,” Nasser stated, adding that the MB group uses Islam to deceive people and grab them to join the party.

Concerning the MB, “they are neither Muslims, nor brothers. They are malevolent … Their leaders outside [the country] cooperated with Baghdad Pact, colonial countries, all our enemies, and Arab reactionary, and proved with clear evidence that the MB party or movement is only a movement that works for the benefit of colonialism and reactionary, by which it is funded.
When Morsi was jailed by then Egyptian people and their appointed representative, al-Sisi, the American government website Foreign Policy allowed a NATO agent, the female "M"B leader from Yemen, Tawakkol Karman, to post an article calling Morsi as the "Mandela of the Arab world", LOL. And when he died the Western governments called him "Egypt's first democratically elected leader". This filthy mullah of the mullah group the so-called Muslim Brotherhood was despised by the Egyptian people but loved by the Crusader NATO governments. As always.
 

Areesh

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Not glorifying but you are not answering the question.
Butto was hanged and body was disrespected. Assuming that was because he was a traitor.
Why Ayub, Yahya, Tikka, AAK Niazi were not hanged? Tried in court?

I don't care

Bhutto was no angel. He used to abduct his opponents just to win elections unopposed

So we can say har sair ko sawa sair hota hai. Same happened with Bhutto
 

Super Falcon

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This is right.
But we need to realize civilian institutions were devastated during martial laws and socalled democratic govt (elected is not necessarily democratic).
Corrput system is required by Zardari sindh ppp and pmln. Establishment is also corrput and a corrput class in itself.
A bitter truth not to trust them. IK learning lesson after assassination attempt. There is immense pressure on him to compromise otherwise face disqualification. I am sure he won't sit back.

Notwithstanding, continuous political engineering and control of judiciary and system by military inc.
I'm only with that leader who come into power and make drastixmc changes in our entire system from establishment judicery politics and constitution
 

airmarshal

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Military establishment does not like to asked questions. It has destroyed Pakistan by pushing the country into American wars in Afghanistan. It hanged an elected (though controversial) PM. It has imposed 4 martial laws.

The nation must get used to asking questions. We should be ruthless. These military officers are servants of the state. Their positions, power, uniforms, pay and pension are all paid by the country, our taxes. How come and when did the servants become the rulers? How come we cant ask them questions or confront them?
 

imadul

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I'm only with that leader who come into power and make drastixmc changes in our entire system from establishment judicery politics and constitution
If PMIK can come again despite Anaconda system of military Inc +judiciary then we can expect that.
If IK fails again we have the fall back position of the spawns of NS (Maryam Nawaz) and Zardari (bilawal).

اس دور کی اسٹیبلشمنٹ نے حسین کو خاندان سمیت قتل کردیا، امت یہی کہ سکی

تم پہ اور میرے آقا کی عنایت نہ سہی
ظالموں کلمہ پڑھانے کا احسان بھی گیا

اقبال کا دانائے یار بھی آہی گیا تھا اس کو مرتے وقت کھٹارا ایمبولینس نصیب ہوئی، لیڈر نہ مرتا تہ یہ اس کو بھی مار دیتے۔

سر آمد روز گارِ ایں فقیرے
دگر دانائے راز آید کہ ناید
 

imadul

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I don't care

Bhutto was no angel. He used to abduct his opponents just to win elections unopposed

So we can say har sair ko sawa sair hota hai. Same happened with Bhutto
..... but you didn't answer the question about sacred evil cows!!???
 

imadul

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Bhai jaan, please think before equating events. Salvador Allende was a Socialist belonging to the Socialist Party of Chile and was assassinated by CIA because he was a Socialist.

OTOH, Morsi was a mullah belonging to the so-called Muslim Brotherhood and was supported supremely by CIA and NATO. As with any mullah group Morsi was installed into presidency by NATO but millions of people of Egypt rose up against his criminal enterprise, the so-called Muslim Brotherhood, and through al-Sisi they removed him and declared the "M"B as a terrorist organization and it was banned. The "M"B in 1954 tried to assassinate the great Socialist leader of Egypt and the Muslims and generally an inspiration for the world's progressives, Jamal Abdul Nasser, and for that the group's leader Sayyid Qutb was executed later. Nasser said this of the so-called Muslim Brotherhood :

When Morsi was jailed by then Egyptian people and their appointed representative, al-Sisi, the American government website Foreign Policy allowed a NATO agent, the female "M"B leader from Yemen, Tawakkol Karman, to post an article calling Morsi as the "Mandela of the Arab world", LOL. And when he died the Western governments called him "Egypt's first democratically elected leader". This filthy mullah of the mullah group the so-called Muslim Brotherhood was despised by the Egyptian people but loved by the Crusader NATO governments. As always.
Guest! You have access to CIA, Pentagon, NSA, Egyptian army, جهاز المخابرات العامة
to know all of that first hand.
Impressive. 👏 👏 👏
 

jamahir

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Guest! You have access to CIA, Pentagon, NSA, Egyptian army, جهاز المخابرات العامة
to know all of that first hand.
Impressive. 👏 👏 👏

What more do you want to start your own search ? I gave you much information including Nasser's own words and you can ask the Egyptian member @Mahmoud_EGY ( though he last posted in 2017 ) about why the Egyptians overthrew Morsi. Were you not on Earth all these years ? Why do you think in 2011 the Libyan Jamahiriya saw the biggest ever invasion force comprising 30+ government militaries of NATO and GCC combined with thousands of Al Qaeda and "Muslim" Brotherhood ? Here's a speech by Nasser that is included in the Egypt Today article but this one has English subtitles and note the reaction of the audience :
 

R2D2

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What more do you want to start your own search ? I gave you much information including Nasser's own words and you can ask the Egyptian member @Mahmoud_EGY ( though he last posted in 2017 ) about why the Egyptians overthrew Morsi. Were you not on Earth all these years ? Why do you think in 2011 the Libyan Jamahiriya saw the biggest ever invasion force comprising 30+ government militaries of NATO and GCC combined with thousands of Al Qaeda and "Muslim" Brotherhood ? Here's a speech by Nasser that is included in the Egypt Today article but this one has English subtitles and note the reaction of the audience :
Saudi Arabia was afraid of Muslim Brotherhood.
 

jamahir

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Saudi Arabia was afraid of Muslim Brotherhood.

Yes but as a movement-form threat to the monarchical structure of Saudia but not an ideological enemy. :) After all in the Libyan invasion of 2011 Saudia and "M"B were happy partners in the NATO-led alliance against Muammar / the Jamahiriya. Please read this article about the love-hate relation between Saudia and "M"B :

Saudi Arabia’s Muslim Brotherhood predicament​

By Stéphane Lacroix
March 20, 2014 at 12:23 p.m. EDT


This article was adapted from a memo prepared for the Project on Middle East Political Science and Ca’ Foscari University “Visions of Gulf Securityworkshop on March 9, 2014 in Venice, Italy.

On March 7, Saudi Arabia named the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist organization, alongside more obvious suspects such as major jihadist groups fighting in Syria. This designation represented a major escalation by Riyadh against the transnational Islamist movement. It also marked a significant departure from its past official stance. In contrast to the fiercely anti-Islamist United Arab Emirates (UAE), where officials have been outspoken in their opposition to the Brotherhood since 2011, the Saudi government has generally avoided explicit attacks on the Brothers. Why the change?

Saudi Arabia hasn’t always had a problem with the Muslim Brotherhood. The kingdom is an avowedly Islamic state, which accords an unusually strong role to its powerful religious establishment. In the 1950s, Saudi Arabia gave shelter to thousands of Brotherhood activists facing harsh repression in Egypt, Syria, and elsewhere. The Brotherhood soon became entrenched both in Saudi society and in the Saudi state, taking a leading role in key governmental ministries. The Muslim Brotherhood’s influence led to the politicization of Saudi Islam. Saudi Islamist movements, known as the Sahwa, grew in later years, with varying degrees of Muslim Brotherhood influence and ideological views, while maintaining a close, non-conflictual relationship with the Saudi state for at least three decades. One of these Sahwa groups even took the name “the Saudi Muslim Brotherhood,” but it functioned independently from the mother organization and its members did not pledge allegiance to the general guide in Cairo.

Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait and the Saudi role in the U.S.-led war that followed created the first major strain in the relationship. Several Brotherhood branches openly criticized the U.S. military presence in Saudi Arabia called for by King Fahd, while the Sahwa launched its own domestic campaign to demand radical political reforms including several unusually direct open letters to the king. By 1994 to 1995, the regime had crushed this campaign, but continued to harbor a deep resentment toward the Brotherhood, which it held responsible for this unprecedented episode of dissent. In a clear sign that the government saw a direct link between the Brothers and the Sahwa, it took measures to curtail the activities of the Sahwa groups and expelled several prominent exiled Muslim Brotherhood (or Muslim Brotherhood-linked, even if not formally members) figures, such as Sayyid Qutb’s brother Muhammad, who taught at Umm al-Qura university. In 2002, in a rare display of anger against the organization, Prince Nayef bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud, then minister of interior, openly accused the Muslim Brotherhood of being the “source of all evils in the Kingdom.”

The next few years witnessed some form of normalization in the relationship, however. The Sahwa was reintegrated to the Saudi religious and social spheres, in exchange for which Sahwa leaders avoided all criticism of the government. This was not only the result of a more accommodating stance on part of the government. After the death of the most respected figures of the official religious establishment, Sheikhs Ibn Baz and Ibn Uthaymin, the royal family needed the Sahwa as an alternative religious establishment to provide for legitimacy as it waged a campaign against jihadist groups such as al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. The royal family’s relationship to the Muslim Brotherhood outside the kingdom simultaneously improved, and contacts that had been suspended were re-established.

The Arab Spring challenged that accommodation, as the Sahwa was tempted to seize the opportunity and make a renewed political stand. Several petitions were published in late February 2011: “Towards a state of rights and institutions,” signed by tens of Sahwa figures including Salman al-Awda; and “A call for reform,” signed by Nasir al-Umar and an array of Sahwa clerics. Al-Awda, in particular, has remained critical of the regime ever since, for instance publishing an open letter to King Abdullah in March 2013. None of those Sahwa leaders supported the call for demonstrations in Riyadh on March 11, 2011, the so-called “day of anger” (which never materialized). Religious institutions benefited from the aid package of tens of billions of dollars announced by King Abdullah to preempt those challenges. Nevertheless, by appearing to back a movement of change that was gaining the whole region, the Sahwa had reawakened the fears of the regime.

When Islamist governments came to power in Egypt and Tunisia, the Saudi regime feared that its own Islamists would feel even more emboldened. The situation in Egypt, the biggest Arab country and one that has close human and economic ties to Saudi Arabia, especially unsettled the Saudi regime. Well aware of the necessity to appease the kingdom’s fears and to obtain Saudi Arabia’s support for the Egyptian economy, President Mohamed Morsi chose Saudi Arabia for his first official visit – a very strong symbol. This, however, wasn’t enough to ease Saudi Arabia’s distrust of the Brothers. Morsi’s apparent willingness to build a “constructive relationship” with Iran – he went to Tehran in August 2012, the first visit of an Egyptian president since Anwar Sadat, and invited Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to Cairo – certainly made things worse. In royal family circles, many seemed convinced that if the Muslim Brotherhood had to choose between Saudi Arabia and Iran, it would choose Iran. All of this led to Saudi Arabia’s support for the coup in Egypt.
This put the royal family in a difficult position at home. During the summer, all the major Sahwa figures signed petitions and statements denouncing the coup, and – in more or less explicit terms – the Saudi government’s support for it. And while some clerics, like Nasir al-Umar, stuck to pure religious rhetoric, arguing that it is “forbidden to rebel against a Muslim ruler” and that what happens in Egypt is “a struggle between the Islamic project and the westernizing project opposed to Islam,” others framed their arguments in more or less explicit terms as a defense of electoral democracy. On Aug. 8, 2013, for instance, 56 sheikhs, some of them known to be close to the Saudi Muslim Brotherhood, condemned the “removal of a legitimately elected president” and a violation of “the will of the people.” They added: “We express our opposition and surprise at the path taken by some countries who have given recognition to the coup … thereby taking part in committing a sin and an aggression forbidden by the laws of Islam – and there will be negative consequences for everyone if Egypt enters a state of chaos and civil war.” On Twitter, in the wake of the Aug. 14, 2013 massacre in Cairo, thousands of Saudis replaced their pictures with the Rabaa sign in solidarity with the Brothers.

This, it seems, was seen by the Saudi regime as a confirmation of its fears. The response was drastic: On the one hand, the government decided to increase its support for the new Egyptian government, providing it with a few extra billion dollars; on the other hand, it launched a new campaign to weaken the Sahwa at home. According to certain sources, a countrywide plan aimed at ridding Saudi universities of “Muslim Brothers” (however this may be understood) was designed. For the first time, all Muslim Brotherhood books were banned at the Riyadh book fair. And several of Al-Awda’s conferences were recently canceled.

But the more drastic measure came on Feb. 4 when a royal decree announced that, from now on, “belonging to intellectual or religious trends or groups that are extremist or categorized as terrorist at the local, regional or international level, as well supporting them, or showing sympathy for their ideas and methods in whichever way, or expressing support for them through whichever means, or offering them financial or moral support, or inciting others to do any of this or promoting any such actions in word or writing” will be punished by a prison sentence “of no less than three years and no more than twenty years.” This decree has several important consequences. First, it endorses the Egyptian designation of the “Muslim Brotherhood” as a terrorist movement. Second, it forbids expressing any form of mere sympathy for the Brothers. Third, it is meant as an impending threat toward the Sahwa and all the groups affiliated with it (obviously, the “Saudi Muslim Brotherhood,” but groups like the “sururis,” a Sahwa affiliate with a more conservative Salafi outlook, could also theoretically be targeted). To increase the pressure, the Saudi ministry of interior made those points explicit in a March 7 statement, which contains a list of groups the kingdom deems “terrorist,” including the Muslim Brotherhood. Also considered “terrorist,” the statement adds, are “all groups that resemble those in the list, in ideology, word or action.”

There remains one core issue on which the regime, the Sahwa, and the Brothers tend to broadly agree: Syria. Yet even here there have been deep tensions, as the Muslim Brotherhood has aligned itself with Qatar and Turkey, often against Saudi clients. There is also a clear connection between the campaign against the Brotherhood and Saudi Arabia’s remarkable March 5 decision to withdraw its ambassador to Qatar. The turmoil within the Syrian rebellion could mark the end of the last field of cooperation between Saudi Arabia and those Islamist movements, and a radical shift in Saudi Arabia’s political strategy.

Although this isn’t the first strain in the Saudi-Muslim Brotherhood relationship, the kingdom is unlikely to backtrack on its anti-Islamist stance – at least anytime soon. The royal family is now convinced by the argument, often made by UAE officials, that the Muslim Brotherhood and all similar groups represent an existential threat for Gulf monarchies. Seen from Riyadh, the solution is to turn the clock back to the pre-1970s era, when the official religious establishment’s quietist brand of Salafism had a monopoly over Saudi Islam. In a globalized kingdom with the largest proportion of social media users in the world, this will not easily succeed.

Stéphane Lacroix is an associate professor of political science at Sciences Po in Paris, France.
 
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imadul

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What more do you want to start your own search ? I gave you much information including Nasser's own words and you can ask the Egyptian member @Mahmoud_EGY ( though he last posted in 2017 ) about why the Egyptians overthrew Morsi. Were you not on Earth all these years ? Why do you think in 2011 the Libyan Jamahiriya saw the biggest ever invasion force comprising 30+ government militaries of NATO and GCC combined with thousands of Al Qaeda and "Muslim" Brotherhood ? Here's a speech by Nasser that is included in the Egypt Today article but this one has English subtitles and note the reaction of the audience :
You are mixing too many things without cohesion.
Nasser came with BH support. The founder hasanul Banna was assassinated and later nasser turned a corner and banned BH and hanged 6 top leaders and imprisoned thousands, many were killed in jail and all were tortured. I don't agree and like religious ideology of BH, JI, and all religious orgs, but I am for human rights, law, and constitution.
Military Inc's of Pakistan, Egypt, and Mayanmar are just a criminal cartel, pakistan Military inc in addition is traitor and mercenary.
 

Enigma SIG

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Cult of Kakul must be reigned in. With their occultist rituals and initiation ceremonies they glorify the international cabal that bestows its satanic blessings and provides them their devilish book that is their playbook to oppression, torture and downright murder of the plebes.
 

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