What's new

Most Dangerous Battle Tanks in Pakistani Service: From Al Khalid I to the T-80

Zarvan

ELITE MEMBER
Apr 28, 2011
50,772
81
56,249
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Faced by much larger armoured units deployed by the Indian Army on its borders, Pakistan has long placed a high emphasis on fielding modern and sophisticated tank units to complement asymmetric assets such as ballistic missiles and nuclear rocket artillery with a powerful conventional force on the ground. Despite having a fully professional army without reliance on conscription, Pakistan’s armoured divisions are still among the largest in the world with around 2,500 tanks thought to be in service. The large majority of tanks in service are either Chinese designs or jointly developed Sino-Pakistani platforms, with China’s emergence as a world leader in the field of armoured warfare technologies having benefited Pakistan’s situation considerably. The only exception to the South Asian states reliance on Chinese designs was the acquisition of the T-80UD tank from Ukraine, which are the heaviest tanks in the Pakistani Army today. An evaluation and ranking of the most capable tanks in Pakistani service is given below:





VT-4 Battle Tank



VT-4

The Pakistani Army’s purchase of the Norinco VT-4 battle tank from China was confirmed in February 2020, with the South Asian state expected to eventually receive over 300 of the platforms. The tank was notably developed specifically for export, and represents by far most capable tank in the country’s inventory. The VT-4 has access to a range of advanced specialised munitions to engage specific types of targets, and comes equipped with either a 125mm or 120mm cannon depending on the kind of munitions the client seeks to use. With China having emerged as a world leader in the development of armour penetrating rounds, the latest of which are compatible with the VT-4’s gun, Pakistani armoured units using the new tank will have a significant firepower advantage over other units which will be further augmented by much greater accuracy. The tank is prized for its GL5 active protection system which can detect incoming projectiles and fire pairs of rockets at them with its double detonation sufficient to neutralise most threats.





Pakistani Al Khalid Battle Tank



Al Khalid I

Entering service from 2001, the Al Khalid program was pursued in parallel to both the less ambitious Al Zarrar program and Pakistani purchases of Ukrainian T-80 tanks in to revolutionise the country's armoured warfare capabilities. The tank is currently operated by three other Chinese defence clients including Myanmar, Bangladesh and Morocco. The tank can fire indigenous Naiza 125 mm depleted uranium anti armour rounds, and benefits from a muzzle reference system and dual-axis stabilisation. Auto tracking for its primary and secondary weapons allows it to cue the targeting of multiple threats at once, while its Integrated Battlefield Management System and digital communications system were among the features placing it ahead of the T-80UD and older Chinese designs in sophistication. For protection the tank benefits from composite armour, explosive reactive armour and the Varta Active protection system. The Al Khalid I represents an enhanced variant of the original design with a capacity for ten more rounds, bringing it up to 49, and a more advanced multi process fire control computer. The tank has improved detection and engagement ranges, an improved rate of fire, new sensors and a new electro-optical jammer. The newer variant is also equipped with indigenous AORAK Mk.2 explosive reactive armour which is highly resistant to various anti armour weapons. Around 50 Al Khalid I tanks are thought to be in service alongside 300 of the original Al Khalid design.





Pakistani T-80UD Battle Tank



T-80UD

Despite having been a longstanding adversary the Soviet Union, Pakistan was able to acquire the most elite class of Soviet battle tank in the aftermath of the superpower’s collapse which was widely considered the most powerful tank of the Cold War period. The heavyweight design was a direct successor to the T-64 and IS-3 tanks, and was never offered for export by the Soviet Union due to the sensitivity of its technologies. The tank was a heavier and more capable counterpart to the T-72 and T-90A tanks, although its high maintenance and operational costs and very high fuel consumption led Russia to prefer the lighter designs, and the T-90 in particular. Ukraine produced the T-80 in limited numbers domestically after the Soviet collapse and provided around 320 of the tanks to the Pakistani Army between 1997 and 2002. Among the T-80’s most notable features are its gas turbine engine, which provide a significant performance boost but also limit endurance due to a far higher rate of fuel consumption, as well as a relatively fast autoloader and a very high level of protection from composite armour and active protection systems. Pakistani T-80 variants are notably much older and less sophisticated than the most advanced T-80BVM variants in Russian service which are technologically over two decades ahead, leaving their ability to counter the most advanced Indian tanks such as the T-90MS highly questionable.





Pakistani Al Zarrar Battle Tank



Al Zarrar

Entering service from 2004, the Al Zarrar tank represents a heavily upgraded version of the Soviet T-54/55 tank which first entered service over half a century prior in 1947. Despite the design’s age, its Chinese and Pakistani developers managed to revolutionise its capabilities providing a cost effective and very low maintenance tank which is well equipped for 21st century combat. The tank’s 125 mm smoothbore gun places its firepower on par with the most heavily armed platforms in the world, and ahead of designs such as the German Leopard II which use smaller cannon. At 44 tons, is 22% heaver than the original T-55 design and has an engine almost 50% more powerful at 730hp. The Al Zarrar program succeed in offering a replacement to for the Chinese Type 59 in Pakistani service without requiring much more maintenance as heavier and more complex designs such as the T-80, or other Chinese tanks offered for export such as the Type 88 or Type 96, would have. The tank benefits from modular composite armour and explosive relative armour for improved survivability, and makes use of modern fire control systems, laser range finders, and a range of advanced munition types including Pakistani manufactured depleted uranium rounds designed for armour penetration. Around 500 Al Zarrar tanks are thought to be in service.





Pakistani Type 85 Battle Tank



Type 85

Formerly forming the elite of Pakistan’s armoured units, around 400 of the Cold War era Type 85 tank are currently in service. The Type 85 was a direct successor to China’s first fully indigenous class of battle tank the Type 69 and inherited many of the same features. The tanks were among the first to feature a 125mm gun providing much improved firepower over previous generations, and had a hemispherical turret similar to the older Type 59. Although not seeing combat, the older Type 69 benefitted from extensive combat testing particularly in Iranian and Iraqi hands which is thought to have influenced the newer design. The tanks were among the first to incorporate appliqué composite armour. Despite their considerable firepower the tanks' designers maintained a very light at around 40 tons, and the design benefits from reduced crew requirements from four to three and from relatively low maintenance requirements.

Most Dangerous Battle Tanks in Pakistani Service: From Al Khalid I to the T-80 (militarywatchmagazine.com)
 

Desert Fox 1

FULL MEMBER
Aug 11, 2020
334
0
579
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
The most dangerous is the mindset of the common Pak folks itself, not the machinery...
Yes, you are very right. Infact it has been the difference of mindsets of not only people after the partition but the overall physcological difference between the people of the indus and Gangetic region. We have been believing and still believe that they(the Hindus) are pretty weak( both physically and morally/mentally). This aggressive, confident and raw mindset is actually the thing that has kept us from not being shaken by the numerical and technological might of India. "India cannot deter Pakistan". And among many reasons for this is the historical command we have had over them backed by religious zeal. Indians on the other hand are good only at mind games. The fact that a hindu cannot put up a good fight against others is prevailent among the common people. We infact enjoy war you may see the casual attitude of Pakistanis towards india although it is much stronger than us on paper. This has to do both with religion as well as history. We infact consider India is against the course and flow of history. And that
"The destiny of Pakistan is the destiny of mankind".
(Gen Hameed Gul)

This kind of fearless mindset is keeping us aloft of all the problems we have been facing all the questions being raised on the so called existenal threats that Pakistan was facing.
 

Hakikat ve Hikmet

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 14, 2015
11,763
13
29,453
Country
United States
Location
United States
Yes, you are very right. Infact it has been the difference of mindsets of not only people after the partition but the overall physcological difference between the people of the indus and Gangetic region. We have been believing and still believe that they(the Hindus) are pretty weak( both physically and morally/mentally). This aggressive, confident and raw mindset is actually the thing that has kept us from not being shaken by the numerical and technological might of India. "India cannot deter Pakistan". And among many reasons for this is the historical command we have had over them backed by religious zeal. Indians on the other hand are good only at mind games. The fact that a hindu cannot put up a good fight against others is prevailent among the common people. We infact enjoy war you may see the casual attitude of Pakistanis towards india although it is much stronger than us on paper. This has to do both with religion as well as history. We infact consider India is against the course and flow of history. And that
"The destiny of Pakistan is the destiny of mankind".
(Gen Hameed Gul)

This kind of fearless mindset is keeping us aloft of all the problems we have been facing all the questions being raised on the so called existenal threats that Pakistan was facing.
The Turkish folks talk about going to war at as if they're going to lunch - President Donald Trump

We're born at our homes, and we die at the battle fields - a Turkish saying
 

iLION12345_1

FULL MEMBER
May 1, 2016
417
2
757
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Please discuss new features of T85UG i.e upgraded ones,
Most of them are already upgraded. They get the engine from the AZ (730 HP).
FCS and GCS from the AKA new auto loader (similar to the one in the AK), among other upgrades.
This was posted by Dazzler a while back:
I am not aware of specific details.
But possible area of upgradation will be in fire control system.
I believe this technically makes them superior to the Al-Zarrar, though ERA is missing on these tanks, I wonder if it can be added (there is a chinese version with ERA so it wouldn’t be too hard to add some mounts and put ERA on it for increased protection, but it might have something to do with weight, even though AZ carries a lot of ERA)

Also I believe our T80UDs were being upgraded as well? They already have many features from T84 as they are very late model tanks but I heard they were getting more upgrades from the oplot.
 

Attachments

Desert Fox 1

FULL MEMBER
Aug 11, 2020
334
0
579
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Most of them are already upgraded. They get the engine from the AZ (730 HP).
FCS and GCS from the AKA new auto loader (similar to the one in the AK), among other upgrades.
This was posted by Dazzler a while back:


I believe this technically makes them superior to the Al-Zarrar, though ERA is missing on these tanks, I wonder if it can be added (there is a chinese version with ERA so it wouldn’t be too hard to add some mounts and put ERA on it for increased protection, but it might have something to do with weight, even though AZ carries a lot of ERA)

Also I believe our T80UDs were being upgraded as well? They already have many features from T84 as they are very late model tanks but I heard they were getting more upgrades from the oplot.
Thanks. I believe type85 is a pretty underrated tank with respect to subcontinent theatre. But the speed is quite low
 

iLION12345_1

FULL MEMBER
May 1, 2016
417
2
757
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Thanks. I believe type85 is a pretty underrated tank with respect to subcontinent theatre. But the speed is quite low
With the new engine it has a similar Power to weight ratio to the AZ. They are not the fastest tanks but they also aren’t front lines machines. VT4, AK/AK1 and T80UDs can handle that. Having a thousand second line tanks is a good idea. Especially since India deploys so many T72s. The Indian T72s when compared to Type85 and AZ are better in some areas and worst in some. (for example The firepower on AZ and Type85 is much better due to the advanced rounds they can fire, Naiza and BTA4.)
But T72 does probably have better protection.
 

Signalian

PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT
Aug 18, 2015
6,947
224
18,681
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Faced by much larger armoured units deployed by the Indian Army on its borders, Pakistan has long placed a high emphasis on fielding modern and sophisticated tank units to complement asymmetric assets such as ballistic missiles and nuclear rocket artillery with a powerful conventional force on the ground. Despite having a fully professional army without reliance on conscription, Pakistan’s armoured divisions are still among the largest in the world with around 2,500 tanks thought to be in service. The large majority of tanks in service are either Chinese designs or jointly developed Sino-Pakistani platforms, with China’s emergence as a world leader in the field of armoured warfare technologies having benefited Pakistan’s situation considerably. The only exception to the South Asian states reliance on Chinese designs was the acquisition of the T-80UD tank from Ukraine, which are the heaviest tanks in the Pakistani Army today. An evaluation and ranking of the most capable tanks in Pakistani service is given below:





VT-4 Battle Tank



VT-4

The Pakistani Army’s purchase of the Norinco VT-4 battle tank from China was confirmed in February 2020, with the South Asian state expected to eventually receive over 300 of the platforms. The tank was notably developed specifically for export, and represents by far most capable tank in the country’s inventory. The VT-4 has access to a range of advanced specialised munitions to engage specific types of targets, and comes equipped with either a 125mm or 120mm cannon depending on the kind of munitions the client seeks to use. With China having emerged as a world leader in the development of armour penetrating rounds, the latest of which are compatible with the VT-4’s gun, Pakistani armoured units using the new tank will have a significant firepower advantage over other units which will be further augmented by much greater accuracy. The tank is prized for its GL5 active protection system which can detect incoming projectiles and fire pairs of rockets at them with its double detonation sufficient to neutralise most threats.





Pakistani Al Khalid Battle Tank



Al Khalid I

Entering service from 2001, the Al Khalid program was pursued in parallel to both the less ambitious Al Zarrar program and Pakistani purchases of Ukrainian T-80 tanks in to revolutionise the country's armoured warfare capabilities. The tank is currently operated by three other Chinese defence clients including Myanmar, Bangladesh and Morocco. The tank can fire indigenous Naiza 125 mm depleted uranium anti armour rounds, and benefits from a muzzle reference system and dual-axis stabilisation. Auto tracking for its primary and secondary weapons allows it to cue the targeting of multiple threats at once, while its Integrated Battlefield Management System and digital communications system were among the features placing it ahead of the T-80UD and older Chinese designs in sophistication. For protection the tank benefits from composite armour, explosive reactive armour and the Varta Active protection system. The Al Khalid I represents an enhanced variant of the original design with a capacity for ten more rounds, bringing it up to 49, and a more advanced multi process fire control computer. The tank has improved detection and engagement ranges, an improved rate of fire, new sensors and a new electro-optical jammer. The newer variant is also equipped with indigenous AORAK Mk.2 explosive reactive armour which is highly resistant to various anti armour weapons. Around 50 Al Khalid I tanks are thought to be in service alongside 300 of the original Al Khalid design.





Pakistani T-80UD Battle Tank



T-80UD

Despite having been a longstanding adversary the Soviet Union, Pakistan was able to acquire the most elite class of Soviet battle tank in the aftermath of the superpower’s collapse which was widely considered the most powerful tank of the Cold War period. The heavyweight design was a direct successor to the T-64 and IS-3 tanks, and was never offered for export by the Soviet Union due to the sensitivity of its technologies. The tank was a heavier and more capable counterpart to the T-72 and T-90A tanks, although its high maintenance and operational costs and very high fuel consumption led Russia to prefer the lighter designs, and the T-90 in particular. Ukraine produced the T-80 in limited numbers domestically after the Soviet collapse and provided around 320 of the tanks to the Pakistani Army between 1997 and 2002. Among the T-80’s most notable features are its gas turbine engine, which provide a significant performance boost but also limit endurance due to a far higher rate of fuel consumption, as well as a relatively fast autoloader and a very high level of protection from composite armour and active protection systems. Pakistani T-80 variants are notably much older and less sophisticated than the most advanced T-80BVM variants in Russian service which are technologically over two decades ahead, leaving their ability to counter the most advanced Indian tanks such as the T-90MS highly questionable.





Pakistani Al Zarrar Battle Tank



Al Zarrar

Entering service from 2004, the Al Zarrar tank represents a heavily upgraded version of the Soviet T-54/55 tank which first entered service over half a century prior in 1947. Despite the design’s age, its Chinese and Pakistani developers managed to revolutionise its capabilities providing a cost effective and very low maintenance tank which is well equipped for 21st century combat. The tank’s 125 mm smoothbore gun places its firepower on par with the most heavily armed platforms in the world, and ahead of designs such as the German Leopard II which use smaller cannon. At 44 tons, is 22% heaver than the original T-55 design and has an engine almost 50% more powerful at 730hp. The Al Zarrar program succeed in offering a replacement to for the Chinese Type 59 in Pakistani service without requiring much more maintenance as heavier and more complex designs such as the T-80, or other Chinese tanks offered for export such as the Type 88 or Type 96, would have. The tank benefits from modular composite armour and explosive relative armour for improved survivability, and makes use of modern fire control systems, laser range finders, and a range of advanced munition types including Pakistani manufactured depleted uranium rounds designed for armour penetration. Around 500 Al Zarrar tanks are thought to be in service.





Pakistani Type 85 Battle Tank



Type 85

Formerly forming the elite of Pakistan’s armoured units, around 400 of the Cold War era Type 85 tank are currently in service. The Type 85 was a direct successor to China’s first fully indigenous class of battle tank the Type 69 and inherited many of the same features. The tanks were among the first to feature a 125mm gun providing much improved firepower over previous generations, and had a hemispherical turret similar to the older Type 59. Although not seeing combat, the older Type 69 benefitted from extensive combat testing particularly in Iranian and Iraqi hands which is thought to have influenced the newer design. The tanks were among the first to incorporate appliqué composite armour. Despite their considerable firepower the tanks' designers maintained a very light at around 40 tons, and the design benefits from reduced crew requirements from four to three and from relatively low maintenance requirements.

Most Dangerous Battle Tanks in Pakistani Service: From Al Khalid I to the T-80 (militarywatchmagazine.com)
Dangerous to T-59 bhi hay, issi liye to mountain peak pe ussay bithaya hua hay :laugh:

Its not beneficial to underestimate a tank. Correct placement of the shot is what it takes.
 

farooqbhai007

FULL MEMBER
Feb 18, 2019
148
3
328
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Dangerous to T-59 bhi hay, issi liye to mountain peak pe ussay bithaya hua hay :laugh:

Its not beneficial to underestimate a tank. Correct placement of the shot is what it takes.
yea ,on a side note, abhi LAC mey kuch areas par chinese type 59s versus BMP-2s hai , udhar dekho kya hota hai agar goli chal gayi , BMP go boom , This is for some areas though , in other areas the indians have T-72s and t-90s the chinese ZTQ-15s & Type 99As
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom