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Modi's policies loosens China’s ‘String of Pearls’

CONNAN

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Feb 23, 2009
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The island nation of Sri Lanka is famous for tea. But its greatest asset may be its geographical location, just to the south of India and in the center of the sea lane connecting Asia and the Middle East for maritime trade.

China is certainly aware of Sri Lanka’s perfect position. It is understandably concerned about the recent rebellious talk from a nation that until last year was cozy with Beijing.

With the support of a Chinese company, Sri Lanka was able to proceed with an ambitious $1.5 billion plan to build a new port city on reclaimed land offshore of Colombo.

This is a signature project as far as China is concerned. Work began at the site last September, and eventually it will have commercial and sports facilities, and residential housing.

Sri Lanka’s new government suddenly slammed on the brakes in early March, ordering the Chinese company to suspend ongoing work at the site.

The reason given was a lack of transparency in the contract. The Sri Lankan government said it would conduct a review and then decide whether to permit the work to continue. China’s foreign ministry responded by saying it hoped that Sri Lanka would “appropriately resolve the relevant issue.”

Big promises, bigger money

Why did Sri Lanka took this step, knowing it would offend China?

The answer to the $1.5 billion question lies in the change of government that took place in January. In that month’s presidential election, the deeply pro-China administration of Mahinda Rajapaksa was replaced by the new administration of Maithripala Sirisena.

Rajapaksa’s administration improved Sri Lanka’s infrastructure with the help of massive investment from China. Sirisena, however, won the election by criticizing the corruption that accompanied those investments.

People therefore expected the new administration to adjust Sri Lanka’s lock-step course with China. The decision to take the knife to such a feature project, however, took everyone by surprise.

China’s concerns about its relations with Sri Lanka do not end there. In February, Sri Lanka’s new Foreign Minister Mangala Samaraweera said that Chinese submarines would no longer be permitted to dock at the island nation’s ports.

If Sri Lanka upholds the ban, it will impact the China’s submarine activity. “China wants to operate its submarines not only in the South China Sea but also in the Indian Ocean,” explained a Japanese official involved in national defense, “and for that Sri Lanka is an important port of call.” The official said he is watching closely to see what Sri Lanka does next.

China has helped build ports and logistics bases in nations around India, including Myanmar, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Pakistan. This strategy has been dubbed China’s “string of pearls.”

Oceans from Asia to the Middle East are under the de facto control of the U.S. Navy. The string of pearls strategy hints that China wants to secure its own sea lanes so it can safely ship resources such as oil, food and minerals to the mainland.

But Sri Lanka is in the center of this string, and the strategy could falter if this pearl were to break free.


Modi joins the fray ::
India, long suspicious of China’s intentions, was quick to move into the gap.

In mid-March, Narendra Modi made the first visit by an Indian prime minister to Sri Lanka in 28 years. He called for closer ties while there. That is a change from the strained bilateral relations that have characterized regional politics since the Tamil Tigers emerged.

That said, China remains an important economic partner for Sri Lanka and it is hard to imagine the island nation suddenly making an about-face toward India.

For better or worse, Japan’s interests are directly tied to sea lanes from Asia to the Middle East. Sri Lanka is at the epicenter of a struggle between India and China that bears watching.

Sri Lanka shock: China's 'string of pearls' gets looser- Nikkei Asian Review
 

wiseone2

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Feb 25, 2015
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The island nation of Sri Lanka is famous for tea. But its greatest asset may be its geographical location, just to the south of India and in the center of the sea lane connecting Asia and the Middle East for maritime trade.

China is certainly aware of Sri Lanka’s perfect position. It is understandably concerned about the recent rebellious talk from a nation that until last year was cozy with Beijing.

With the support of a Chinese company, Sri Lanka was able to proceed with an ambitious $1.5 billion plan to build a new port city on reclaimed land offshore of Colombo.

This is a signature project as far as China is concerned. Work began at the site last September, and eventually it will have commercial and sports facilities, and residential housing.

Sri Lanka’s new government suddenly slammed on the brakes in early March, ordering the Chinese company to suspend ongoing work at the site.

The reason given was a lack of transparency in the contract. The Sri Lankan government said it would conduct a review and then decide whether to permit the work to continue. China’s foreign ministry responded by saying it hoped that Sri Lanka would “appropriately resolve the relevant issue.”

Big promises, bigger money

Why did Sri Lanka took this step, knowing it would offend China?

The answer to the $1.5 billion question lies in the change of government that took place in January. In that month’s presidential election, the deeply pro-China administration of Mahinda Rajapaksa was replaced by the new administration of Maithripala Sirisena.

Rajapaksa’s administration improved Sri Lanka’s infrastructure with the help of massive investment from China. Sirisena, however, won the election by criticizing the corruption that accompanied those investments.

People therefore expected the new administration to adjust Sri Lanka’s lock-step course with China. The decision to take the knife to such a feature project, however, took everyone by surprise.

China’s concerns about its relations with Sri Lanka do not end there. In February, Sri Lanka’s new Foreign Minister Mangala Samaraweera said that Chinese submarines would no longer be permitted to dock at the island nation’s ports.

If Sri Lanka upholds the ban, it will impact the China’s submarine activity. “China wants to operate its submarines not only in the South China Sea but also in the Indian Ocean,” explained a Japanese official involved in national defense, “and for that Sri Lanka is an important port of call.” The official said he is watching closely to see what Sri Lanka does next.

China has helped build ports and logistics bases in nations around India, including Myanmar, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Pakistan. This strategy has been dubbed China’s “string of pearls.”

Oceans from Asia to the Middle East are under the de facto control of the U.S. Navy. The string of pearls strategy hints that China wants to secure its own sea lanes so it can safely ship resources such as oil, food and minerals to the mainland.

But Sri Lanka is in the center of this string, and the strategy could falter if this pearl were to break free.


Modi joins the fray ::
India, long suspicious of China’s intentions, was quick to move into the gap.

In mid-March, Narendra Modi made the first visit by an Indian prime minister to Sri Lanka in 28 years. He called for closer ties while there. That is a change from the strained bilateral relations that have characterized regional politics since the Tamil Tigers emerged.

That said, China remains an important economic partner for Sri Lanka and it is hard to imagine the island nation suddenly making an about-face toward India.

For better or worse, Japan’s interests are directly tied to sea lanes from Asia to the Middle East. Sri Lanka is at the epicenter of a struggle between India and China that bears watching.

Sri Lanka shock: China's 'string of pearls' gets looser- Nikkei Asian Review
Docking in Sri Lanka was a provocative act by China
 

SuperSubrayan

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Mar 30, 2015
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The island nation of Sri Lanka is famous for tea. But its greatest asset may be its geographical location, just to the south of India and in the center of the sea lane connecting Asia and the Middle East for maritime trade.

China is certainly aware of Sri Lanka’s perfect position. It is understandably concerned about the recent rebellious talk from a nation that until last year was cozy with Beijing.

With the support of a Chinese company, Sri Lanka was able to proceed with an ambitious $1.5 billion plan to build a new port city on reclaimed land offshore of Colombo.

This is a signature project as far as China is concerned. Work began at the site last September, and eventually it will have commercial and sports facilities, and residential housing.

Sri Lanka’s new government suddenly slammed on the brakes in early March, ordering the Chinese company to suspend ongoing work at the site.

The reason given was a lack of transparency in the contract. The Sri Lankan government said it would conduct a review and then decide whether to permit the work to continue. China’s foreign ministry responded by saying it hoped that Sri Lanka would “appropriately resolve the relevant issue.”

Big promises, bigger money

Why did Sri Lanka took this step, knowing it would offend China?

The answer to the $1.5 billion question lies in the change of government that took place in January. In that month’s presidential election, the deeply pro-China administration of Mahinda Rajapaksa was replaced by the new administration of Maithripala Sirisena.

Rajapaksa’s administration improved Sri Lanka’s infrastructure with the help of massive investment from China. Sirisena, however, won the election by criticizing the corruption that accompanied those investments.

People therefore expected the new administration to adjust Sri Lanka’s lock-step course with China. The decision to take the knife to such a feature project, however, took everyone by surprise.

China’s concerns about its relations with Sri Lanka do not end there. In February, Sri Lanka’s new Foreign Minister Mangala Samaraweera said that Chinese submarines would no longer be permitted to dock at the island nation’s ports.

If Sri Lanka upholds the ban, it will impact the China’s submarine activity. “China wants to operate its submarines not only in the South China Sea but also in the Indian Ocean,” explained a Japanese official involved in national defense, “and for that Sri Lanka is an important port of call.” The official said he is watching closely to see what Sri Lanka does next.

China has helped build ports and logistics bases in nations around India, including Myanmar, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Pakistan. This strategy has been dubbed China’s “string of pearls.”

Oceans from Asia to the Middle East are under the de facto control of the U.S. Navy. The string of pearls strategy hints that China wants to secure its own sea lanes so it can safely ship resources such as oil, food and minerals to the mainland.

But Sri Lanka is in the center of this string, and the strategy could falter if this pearl were to break free.


Modi joins the fray ::
India, long suspicious of China’s intentions, was quick to move into the gap.

In mid-March, Narendra Modi made the first visit by an Indian prime minister to Sri Lanka in 28 years. He called for closer ties while there. That is a change from the strained bilateral relations that have characterized regional politics since the Tamil Tigers emerged.

That said, China remains an important economic partner for Sri Lanka and it is hard to imagine the island nation suddenly making an about-face toward India.

For better or worse, Japan’s interests are directly tied to sea lanes from Asia to the Middle East. Sri Lanka is at the epicenter of a struggle between India and China that bears watching.

Sri Lanka shock: China's 'string of pearls' gets looser- Nikkei Asian Review
Not exactly . At some points we have achieved it. Still long way to go . Unless we fund and equip our brothers in Vietnam China will keep arming Pakistan. Tejas can strengthen Vietnam airforce as soon work will progress on bramos mini . If we can break Chinese Pakistan cooperation this whole plan will fall. Now we need to walk the talk. Stop delayed delivery . Work fur the nation and complete ssn at faster manner as we planned . Good but without execution it doesn't matter
 

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