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Misery Index: Who's Less Miserable? India or Pakistan?

Bilal9

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Great informative and humble post.
Yes, BD maybe over-crowded but it does have lots of water and arable land. Plus other factors as you mentioned.
People also need to realize that a large part of Pakistan is desert/arid and yet the population of Pakistan is bigger than BD.
I tend to think Pakistan's problems/not realizing full potentials are deeply rooted in geopolitics. Unlike BD, Pakistan is in really tough geopolitical situation and I think the approximate two decades lost by Pakistan since 1989, on top of huge spending and focus on defense matters since 1947, had a direct connection with geopolitical events. BD is very lucky--or wise--on that count.
Bhai it is a sad statement that due to the miscalculation of some of our politicians on both sides (and of course Indian saajish) our countries became separated. Otherwise we had a dynamic combination and complementary economies as two wings of Pakistan. Our politicians failed to see the potential beyond the petty "Udhar tum, Idhar hum" philosophy. Together we could have beaten Indian economy handily, the way investments before 1971 were going. The lost decades in Pakistan were a drag as well. Bangladesh post 1971 became an economic vassal of India and a captive market, improving Indian economy far beyond the proportion of population in Bangladesh. This was a huge net gain for Indian economy post 1971 and continues to be crucially important to Indian economy to this day, which they hardly admit.

Lately there has been a lot of heartburn in Indian Sanghi leader circles because of the fact that China became a closer trade partner in lieu of India. Now we need to do the same thing with Pakistan as well.

When you see Bangladeshi twenty somethings cheer for Pakistan winning against their own team in cricket matches then you realize the depth of fellow feeling Bangladeshis have for Pakistan. We should really work against Indian machinations to improve our mutual trade and cultural exchanges (along with same ties with China, Turkey and Indonesia) to bring us together again. at least economically. This alone will provide a bulwark against Indian expansionism.

People do not realize how important this is, Bangladesh reducing trade dependency with India. The sooner we do this, the better it is. Only Bangladeshis and Pakistanis should trade and mutually benefit each other, benefitting India trade wise to the tune of hundreds of Billions annually helps none of our two nations.
 
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Vapnope

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India has not counted number of poor people since 2011, i am not even sure how they try to compare poverty level with Pakistan. Moreover look at the minimum wage in Pakistan vs India.
 

RiazHaq

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Modi’s Reform Momentum Has Hit a Wall in #India. Big chunks of #Modi’s #economic agenda could get delayed or scrapped. The reversal of #FarmLaws and a possible stalling of the new #labor codes could be the beginning of two years of inertia. #economy #BJP https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/a...major-political-road-bumps-in-india?tid=ss_tw


Investors must be wondering what promise New Delhi will break next as the ruling party tries to win upcoming state elections. First, the government made a U-turn on the three laws that Prime Minister Narendra Modi wanted to use to shake up the stagnant farm economy. Next, he may delay implementing the four codes that have been billed as the “biggest labor reforms in independent India,” as Bloomberg News reported. Has the Modi momentum finally come up against a wall?

Take the labor laws passed by parliament in September last year. So far, only 10 out of India’s 28 states have followed through by finalizing rules on industrial relations, wages, social security and workplace safety. Considering Modi’s party is in power in 17 states, politicians clearly fear resistance.

It’s been a longtime demand by the business community that industrial units with fewer than 300 workers shouldn’t require government permission to fire employees. (The federally mandated limit currently affects factories employing more than 100 workers, acting as a perverse incentive against growth, though some states have relaxed the rules.) Still, codifying this concession won’t exactly win votes. Similarly, giving a legal boost to retirement nest-eggs — as the new rules demand — will ultimately benefit employees. Yet they won’t be thrilled if it means lower take-home pay now.

Why is it so hard for a powerful — and, after more than seven years in the top job, still highly popular — leader to enforce his will? Modi promised sweeping, productivity-enhancing changes to factors of production — land, labor and capital. He also pledged a revamp of crucial commodity markets like food. In each instance, being perceived as pro-big business was the undoing of his policies.

The first setback was land. The previous government, battling popular anger for allowing land grabs in the name of special economic zones, had passed an acquisition law in 2013 that big business found too restrictive. Within a year of becoming prime minister, Modi tried to tilt the balance so that village plots could be acquired more easily for infrastructure or affordable housing. But opposition leader Rahul Gandhi mocked him in parliament for favoring crony capitalists dressed in “suits and boots.” Modi gave up the idea.

Ditto the controversial agriculture laws. Modi backed them to the hilt against relentless protests by farmers. But since the overall package gave the impression that the state was going to retreat from grain procurement, leaving farmers at the mercy of large business groups, it became too hot a potato to hold through next year’s state elections in Uttar Pradesh and Punjab. So Modi dropped his ambitious plan, closing the door at least for some years on reforms of the subsidy-ridden farm and food economy. Now it looks like the new labor codes are going into cold storage, too.

Meanwhile, reforms to improve capital allocation in the economy are a mixed bag. Despite opposition from bank employees’ unions, a bill — to be introduced in the upcoming winter session of parliament — will pave the way for privatizing two state-run lenders. Investors will pay attention to the fate of this law. They should also closely watch the government’s 6 trillion rupees ($80 billion) asset recycling plan. This, too, could potentially become a political minefield.
 

nahtanbob

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People do not realize how important this is, Bangladesh reducing trade dependency with India. The sooner we do this, the better it is. Only Bangladeshis and Pakistanis should trade and mutually benefit each other, benefitting India trade wise to the tune of hundreds of Billions annually helps none of our two nations.
Bangladesh and Pakistan had 25 years to establish a mutually beneficial relationship
 

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