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Marathi families in Karachi

Oct 28, 2019
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Just as the sun began to go down and the frantic hustle-bustle of public transport waned, women wearing Banarasi saris, and their children dancing to the rhythm of drumbeats, start pouring into a marriage hall. Inside the city’s red zone, near five star hotels and the Sindh Chief Minister’s House, the marriage hall is illuminated with lights and chairs set around a round table for the grand ceremony.
In one corner, on a raised platform under a mandap (canopy), a white-haired pandit (priest) wearing a shawl printed with Hindi verses gets ready for the holy ritual. Suddenly, someone shouted “Dulha aagaya” (the groom has arrived) and the guests sitting inside the hall rush towards the main entrance.
Attired in a maroon Sherwani and wearing a Sehra (floral headdress), the groom, surrounded by a large number of females, entered the marriage hall. A few minutes later, the dulhan (bride) – also wearing maroon sari and a sehra – arrives inside. The sari with golden borders and a matching bindiya with traditional jewellery including nath (nose ring), adds to the beauty of the bride. This is the scene of a traditional Marathi wedding in the city and the stage is all set for the couple to tie nuptials. A Marathi wedding may not be such a surprise in the city, as according to local Maharashtrians, around 250 Marathi families (around 2,500 members) are still living in Karachi. Marathi Hindus under the surnames of Gaikwar and Jadav among others are living in Sindh.
Despite their tiny numbers, Maharashtrians’ presence confirms the cosmopolitan nature of the city.
Sindh is the only place in Pakistan where one can find Marathi, Gujarati, Behari, Rajasthani and even people from Kerala and other Indian states.
As Sindh was part of the Bombay Presidency under the British Raj, a large number of people from different Indian states flocked to Sindh. After partition, many of them returned but a few of them stayed behind.
Inside the wedding mandap, the pandit starts reciting a mantra from the holy book.
Holding each others’ hands, the couple starts pheras (circling) of the holy fire set in the middle of the mandap.
The relatives shower the couple with cereal grains, wishing them a happy and prosperous life ahead.
Talking with Pakistan Today, some wedding participants said that a traditional Maharashtrian wedding entirely different from the one witnessed in Karachi.
“The actual Marathi nuptials are held during the day time and there are no pheras (circles around holy fire). The couple stands in two separate baskets with a white cloth as a curtain between them and then the pandit recites the basic rituals,” they said.
“Under the influence from Indian films and dramas on Star Plus channel, the local Marathi people are forgetting their culture,” an elderly participant at the wedding told Pakistan Today.
She said that usually the Marathi brides drape themselves in a green sari, which is considered a fortunate colour, but now they have started wearing different colours. “The Maharashtrians in Sindh have forgotten their traditional rituals like Shakar Puda (distribution of sugar on engagement), Kelvan (family feast) and Pithi (mixture of turmeric, sandalwood, scented oil and cream prepared for bride) among other rituals.”
Living far away from their own culture for several decades in this cosmopolitan city, many young Maharashtrians cannot even speak their mother tongue now, which is turning out to be a matter of great concern for their elderly, who think that their culture might be lost under the influence of films and dramas.

https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2011/11/23/in-cosmopolitan-karachi-tying-the-knot-marathi-style/
 
Oct 28, 2019
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Apart from me and @Kryptonite and maybe @Chattrapati, are there any other Marathi guys on PDF? And of course, are there Pakistani Marathi PDFers?
 

waz

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Just as the sun began to go down and the frantic hustle-bustle of public transport waned, women wearing Banarasi saris, and their children dancing to the rhythm of drumbeats, start pouring into a marriage hall. Inside the city’s red zone, near five star hotels and the Sindh Chief Minister’s House, the marriage hall is illuminated with lights and chairs set around a round table for the grand ceremony.
In one corner, on a raised platform under a mandap (canopy), a white-haired pandit (priest) wearing a shawl printed with Hindi verses gets ready for the holy ritual. Suddenly, someone shouted “Dulha aagaya” (the groom has arrived) and the guests sitting inside the hall rush towards the main entrance.
Attired in a maroon Sherwani and wearing a Sehra (floral headdress), the groom, surrounded by a large number of females, entered the marriage hall. A few minutes later, the dulhan (bride) – also wearing maroon sari and a sehra – arrives inside. The sari with golden borders and a matching bindiya with traditional jewellery including nath (nose ring), adds to the beauty of the bride. This is the scene of a traditional Marathi wedding in the city and the stage is all set for the couple to tie nuptials. A Marathi wedding may not be such a surprise in the city, as according to local Maharashtrians, around 250 Marathi families (around 2,500 members) are still living in Karachi. Marathi Hindus under the surnames of Gaikwar and Jadav among others are living in Sindh.
Despite their tiny numbers, Maharashtrians’ presence confirms the cosmopolitan nature of the city.
Sindh is the only place in Pakistan where one can find Marathi, Gujarati, Behari, Rajasthani and even people from Kerala and other Indian states.
As Sindh was part of the Bombay Presidency under the British Raj, a large number of people from different Indian states flocked to Sindh. After partition, many of them returned but a few of them stayed behind.
Inside the wedding mandap, the pandit starts reciting a mantra from the holy book.
Holding each others’ hands, the couple starts pheras (circling) of the holy fire set in the middle of the mandap.
The relatives shower the couple with cereal grains, wishing them a happy and prosperous life ahead.
Talking with Pakistan Today, some wedding participants said that a traditional Maharashtrian wedding entirely different from the one witnessed in Karachi.
“The actual Marathi nuptials are held during the day time and there are no pheras (circles around holy fire). The couple stands in two separate baskets with a white cloth as a curtain between them and then the pandit recites the basic rituals,” they said.
“Under the influence from Indian films and dramas on Star Plus channel, the local Marathi people are forgetting their culture,” an elderly participant at the wedding told Pakistan Today.
She said that usually the Marathi brides drape themselves in a green sari, which is considered a fortunate colour, but now they have started wearing different colours. “The Maharashtrians in Sindh have forgotten their traditional rituals like Shakar Puda (distribution of sugar on engagement), Kelvan (family feast) and Pithi (mixture of turmeric, sandalwood, scented oil and cream prepared for bride) among other rituals.”
Living far away from their own culture for several decades in this cosmopolitan city, many young Maharashtrians cannot even speak their mother tongue now, which is turning out to be a matter of great concern for their elderly, who think that their culture might be lost under the influence of films and dramas.

https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2011/11/23/in-cosmopolitan-karachi-tying-the-knot-marathi-style/
They are getting absorbed by the far large Hindu Sindhi population. I never knew about the Marathi families, good read.
 
Oct 28, 2019
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They are getting absorbed by the far large Hindu Sindhi population. I never knew about the Marathi families, good read.
I checked a few videos as well about them. Unfortunately, they don't speak fluent Marathi. Their accent is understandable but very different. But I guess, as people change places they start losing their originality. I have seen people from other parts from India coming to Maharashtra and adopting Maharashtrian culture, festivals, etc as well and going on to speak fluent Marathi. That's the way it is I guess.
 

SABRE

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Just as the sun began to go down and the frantic hustle-bustle of public transport waned, women wearing Banarasi saris, and their children dancing to the rhythm of drumbeats, start pouring into a marriage hall. Inside the city’s red zone, near five star hotels and the Sindh Chief Minister’s House, the marriage hall is illuminated with lights and chairs set around a round table for the grand ceremony.
In one corner, on a raised platform under a mandap (canopy), a white-haired pandit (priest) wearing a shawl printed with Hindi verses gets ready for the holy ritual. Suddenly, someone shouted “Dulha aagaya” (the groom has arrived) and the guests sitting inside the hall rush towards the main entrance.
Attired in a maroon Sherwani and wearing a Sehra (floral headdress), the groom, surrounded by a large number of females, entered the marriage hall. A few minutes later, the dulhan (bride) – also wearing maroon sari and a sehra – arrives inside. The sari with golden borders and a matching bindiya with traditional jewellery including nath (nose ring), adds to the beauty of the bride. This is the scene of a traditional Marathi wedding in the city and the stage is all set for the couple to tie nuptials. A Marathi wedding may not be such a surprise in the city, as according to local Maharashtrians, around 250 Marathi families (around 2,500 members) are still living in Karachi. Marathi Hindus under the surnames of Gaikwar and Jadav among others are living in Sindh.
Despite their tiny numbers, Maharashtrians’ presence confirms the cosmopolitan nature of the city.
Sindh is the only place in Pakistan where one can find Marathi, Gujarati, Behari, Rajasthani and even people from Kerala and other Indian states.
As Sindh was part of the Bombay Presidency under the British Raj, a large number of people from different Indian states flocked to Sindh. After partition, many of them returned but a few of them stayed behind.
Inside the wedding mandap, the pandit starts reciting a mantra from the holy book.
Holding each others’ hands, the couple starts pheras (circling) of the holy fire set in the middle of the mandap.
The relatives shower the couple with cereal grains, wishing them a happy and prosperous life ahead.
Talking with Pakistan Today, some wedding participants said that a traditional Maharashtrian wedding entirely different from the one witnessed in Karachi.
“The actual Marathi nuptials are held during the day time and there are no pheras (circles around holy fire). The couple stands in two separate baskets with a white cloth as a curtain between them and then the pandit recites the basic rituals,” they said.
“Under the influence from Indian films and dramas on Star Plus channel, the local Marathi people are forgetting their culture,” an elderly participant at the wedding told Pakistan Today.
She said that usually the Marathi brides drape themselves in a green sari, which is considered a fortunate colour, but now they have started wearing different colours. “The Maharashtrians in Sindh have forgotten their traditional rituals like Shakar Puda (distribution of sugar on engagement), Kelvan (family feast) and Pithi (mixture of turmeric, sandalwood, scented oil and cream prepared for bride) among other rituals.”
Living far away from their own culture for several decades in this cosmopolitan city, many young Maharashtrians cannot even speak their mother tongue now, which is turning out to be a matter of great concern for their elderly, who think that their culture might be lost under the influence of films and dramas.

https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2011/11/23/in-cosmopolitan-karachi-tying-the-knot-marathi-style/
Karachi is mini-South Asia as you can find major ethnic and religious groups from the region here in this single city. Of course, most are Muslims but there is a sizable Hindu population in both urban and rural centres of Sindh, and they are quite visible and social people, in the sense that they do not hide their identities (there isn't any need for that). It might be difficult, especially for an outsider, to distinguish them from other people in Sindh though, until they tell you their names. Our Muslim outlook is not similar to the ones found in India or as the Bollywood propagates; nor is our Hindu's outlook similar to the ones found in India. In usual cases, we all look and talk the same without having to impose the fact that one is a Muslim, Hindu, Christian, etc. Some of the Hindus may, however, identify themselves as Gujratis, Rajhastanis, Marathis, etc, but almost all of them appear highly localised. As someone with strong roots in Sindh and regularly socialises with Hindus even I would find it difficult to distinguish between local Hindu and localized Hindu in most cases. I am not an expert on Hinduism but local Hindus of Sindh have some beliefs and ritual practices that are different from mainstream Hinduism in India. These belives and practices may have also influenced the localised Hindus. Thus, the differences in the Marathi wedding mentioned in your post (possibly).
 
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manga

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Apart from me and @Kryptonite and maybe @Chattrapati, are there any other Marathi guys on PDF? And of course, are there Pakistani Marathi PDFers?
:big_boss: yupp

In comments section one of the guy commenting has name "Junaid kelkar".
Only marathi would know how ridiculous that sounds... lol
 
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:big_boss: yupp

In comments section one of the guy commenting has name "Junaid kelkar".
Only marathi would know how ridiculous that sounds... lol
Some Marathi Muslim families also migrated to Pakistan. So that's why maybe the surname 'Junaid Kelkar'.
Btw, are you Marathi as well?
 

leuitenentcolonel

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My grand father was from state gwaliar, though my family has nothing in common as compared with to the ones living in india.
 
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My grand father was from state gwaliar, though my family has nothing in common as compared with to the ones living in india.
Gwalior is in the state of Madhya Pradesh. Having so much distance, it makes sense that your family is not likely to have much in common with your other family living in India.
 

DESERT FIGHTER

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Karachi is mini-South Asia as you can find major ethnic and religious groups from the region here in this single city. Of course, most are Muslims but there is a sizable Hindu population in both urban and rural centres of Sindh, and they are quite visible and social people, in the sense that they do not hide their identities (there is any need for that). It might be difficult, especially for an outsider, to distinguish them from other people in Sindh though, until they tell you their names. Our Muslim outlook is not similar to the ones found in India or as the Bollywood propagates; nor is our Hindu's outlook similar to the ones found in India. In usual cases, we all look and talk the same without having to impose the fact that one is a Muslim, Hindu, Christian, etc. Some of the Hindus may, however, identify themselves as Gujratis, Rajhastanis, Marathis, etc, but almost all of them appear highly localised. As someone with strong roots in Sindh and regularly socialises with Hindus even I would find it difficult to distinguish between local Hindu and localized Hindu in most cases. I am not an expert on Hinduism but local Hindus of Sindh have some beliefs and ritual practices that are different from mainstream Hinduism in India. These belives and practices may have also influenced the localised Hindus. Thus, the differences in the Marathi wedding mentioned in your post (possibly).
Sindhi Hindus also worship different deities and even bury their dead.

Do you remember Sepoy Lal Chand who embraced martyrdom in FATA,
2B47C75D-D216-44CD-8289-F35C9F06C641.jpeg


here is his grave:

 
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Brother mine,


Please, don't compare PakHindus with Ganguz... two different things...
Why do you like to pollute every thread with your presence? There was not one negative comment and here you come with your bigotry.
I know I will get another stupid reply so save your effort. I won't be replying to you.

Sindhi Hindus also worship different deities and even bury their dead.

Do you remember Sepoy Lal Chand who embraced martyrdom in FATA,
View attachment 598067

here is his grave:

Didn't know there were Pakistani Hindus in army as well. Good to see them fighting for your country.

And it doesn't matter whether you bury your dead or burn them. Ultimately, what matters is how you lived your life.
 

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