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Making the case for a global ban on privately-owned personal transport cars and two-wheelers

Verve

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Yes but only iranian petrol and security threat as well.

Iranian petrol is smugled one and of very poor quality.

Even if we go on super bikes we have to take fuel in a trick with us for refuelling.

2 years back pak army arranged a rally to gawadar for heavy bikes and most of them came back on army trucks due to fuel filter blockage ...
Such trips of super bikes is just asking for trouble ... I was saying that you could go for adventure bike route as there is a lot. Fuel is not a major issue if you carry the additional filter at tank fill and petrol cans. Many have travelled deep inside Baluchistan without any issues as such.
 

ahmadnawaz22

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In developed countries this solution may be applicable.
But in developing countries? Public transport Infrastructure is p*** poor.
And talking about Pakistan Public transporters will eat the middle class alive if there is such a high demand due to no private vehicles.
There will be even poor condition transport with sky high fares and Government will not do a damn to control this situation as there mouth will be filled by high bribes from transporters. Dont know if it is the same in India.
 

jamahir

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In developed countries this solution may be applicable.
But in developing countries? Public transport Infrastructure is p*** poor.
And talking about Pakistan Public transporters will eat the middle class alive if there is such a high demand due to no private vehicles.
There will be even poor condition transport with sky high fares and Government will not do a damn to control this situation as there mouth will be filled by high bribes from transporters. Dont know if it is the same in India.
1. To talk only about buses, like I have said in previous posts, in developing country India there are government-owned state road transport corporations for intra-city bus service ( in my city for a minimum distance the fare is about five to seven rupees ), inter-city bus service and city-to-village bus service. The inter-city service fares depend on the type of bus - luxury ( Volvo ) or regular. There are also private bus operators. So the country is generally well-connected though the private operators often try to fill up their buses like a fish market. And there is a YT vid about a Pakistani inter-city bus service with the bus having a small kitchen and a toilet.

2. Should cyclorotor-based bus service come about it should be operated by the government so that in case of intra-city service it can be free ( ideally, like North Korea has I think ) or at reasonable fares. The inter-city and city-to-village service should be of the bus having kitchen and toilet facilities and 30-passenger comfortable seating so that there is no excuse for having a luxury variant and a ordinary variant thus having the same reasonable fares.

Pollution and private transport are two different issues ... emission policies are quite effective in developed nations - visit UK. London has congestion charge and I am in favour of it - happily pay it too when I need to drive to London.
Nice that you happily pay congestion charge but this charge is a half-hearted effort which does not seek to solve the problem at system level. We can keep the congestion charge but the pollution, the crime, the accidents and the chaos will remain, hence my reasoning in the OP of simplifying the problem and entirely doing away with privately-owned personal transport. The below article I found just about half an hour ago :

Scientists express doubt that Glasgow climate change conference will be successful

David Knowles
David Knowles

·Senior Editor
Thu, October 28, 2021, 2:30 PM

If there is a consensus about the forthcoming United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland, it is that it represents, in the words of U.S. climate envoy John Kerry, the “last best hope” for the world to keep the worst consequences of global warming at bay.

But for many of the scientists whose work has informed the grim reports issued by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in recent years, the chances that an agreement will be reached to keep global temperatures from rising 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels seem dim, at best. With the currently insufficient actions from developed countries to limit greenhouse gas emissions and fund developing nations in that pursuit, temperatures are forecast to smash through that threshold. And a growing body of research, some conducted by scientists who spoke with Yahoo News’ “The Climate Crisis Podcast,” shows that a cascade of dire consequences is all but certain to follow.
“Well, it is a critical time. You know, this is COP26, which means there have been 25 of these things already,” said Peter Gleick, a climate scientist, referring to the conference’s acronym. “We’re way behind the curve in acting on what we have known for many, many years to be the reality, which is that humans are changing the climate, that those changes are going to be bad, that they’re going to accelerate as we move forward if we don’t get emissions under control, and that we're running out of time to prevent the worst-case scenarios from occurring.”

A co-founder of the Pacific Institute in Oakland, Calif., Gleick has spent decades warning that rising temperatures have begun to wreak havoc with the water cycle, including more severe drought, deadly flash flooding and crop instability.

People take part in a 'Global march for climate justice'

People in Milan, Italy, demonstrate for climate justice in advance of COP26 on Oct. 2. (Guglielmo Mangiapane/Reuters)

“A lot of us are looking forward to COP26 as an opportunity to make some real progress, but of course we’re worried that COP26 will turn out to be like COP25 and COP24 and COP23 beforehand, before us, and not really produce the kinds of changes that we know are necessary,” Gleick said, referring to previous U.N. climate change conferences that have inspired good intentions but not substantial enough actions from the wealthier countries that produce most of the greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming.

As far as the scientific community is concerned, there’s little mystery about what’s responsible for climate change. A review published this week in the journalEnvironmental Research Letters looked at 88,128 scientific papers on climate change published between 2012 and 2020 and concluded that 99.9 percent of the studies agreed that human beings were responsible for the current spike in global temperatures.

For UCLA climate scientist Daniel Swain, the only real suspense heading into Glasgow concerns whether world leaders will forge a consensus on how to act on what, scientifically speaking, is an open-and-shut case.

The Windy Fire

The Windy Fire blazes through Sequoia National Forest near California Hot Springs, Calif. (David McNew/Getty Images)

“We know how to solve this problem. We know the kinds of specific things we need to be doing even to fix the problem,” Swain told “The Climate Crisis Podcast.” “But that will involve a significant amount of social and economic, you know, inertia, that needs to shift pretty quickly. And that’s hard to do.”

A lead author of one of the IPCC reports that have synthesized the research on climate change and helped guide policymakers on how to keep global temperatures from rising above 1.5 degrees Celsius, Stanford University climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh has not been encouraged by the actions taken since COP21 in 2015, when many nations signed on to the Paris Agreement.
“The United Nations actually just issued a report in advance of the Glasgow negotiations that are coming up, basically tracking where the countries of the world are relative to the the Paris Agreement goals, and that puts the world on a trajectory that’s a lot above two and a half degrees [Celsius] of warming, and approaching three,” Diffenbaugh said.

This year, a string of deadly extreme weather events in the U.S. showed many Americans that the threat from climate change is real. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, weather-related disasters in 2021 have already totaled over $100 billion in damages and killed 538 people in the U.S.

Joe Biden

President Biden at the White House on Tuesday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Yet a Yahoo News poll released last week finds that while 50 percent of Americans now view climate change as an “emergency,” there is a partisan divide on the question. Though 78 percent of Democrats see climate change as “an existential threat that requires major legislation,” just 24 percent of Republicans and 45 percent of independents do.

At the same time, armed with more advanced computer modeling and thousands of new studies to back them up, climate scientists have grown increasingly confident linking those events to climate change.

Researchers like Benjamin Strauss, president and CEO of Climate Central, a nonprofit news organization that analyzes climate science, have long warned exactly what rising temperatures will mean for life on Earth. In 2012, Strauss testified before Congress on the number of homes in the U.S. that would be put at risk due to rising seas. He knows firsthand that domestic political gridlock on climate change could weigh heavily on Glasgow.
“I know that President Biden and the administration really want — as represented by John Kerry in the talks — to be ambitious and to encourage other nations of the world to be ambitious,” Strauss said. “And it’s going to be really hard to do if in the United States we don’t have some form of legislation or policy either in place or, you know, imminent, that’s going to be a big step in our own effort.”

While Congress continues to debate the legislation that will determine how aggressively the U.S. will go about the task of cutting greenhouse gas emissions, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., has already killed the most powerful weapon in the president’s plan to do so: the Clean Electricity Performance Program.

Cycle rickshaw pullers

People wade through a flooded street in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in July. (Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images)

The failure to enact an agenda that would be seen as restoring American climate leadership on the world stage comes as a stark reminder that any promises of future U.S. emissions cuts will require action in Congress. Yet the inward focus of many Republicans and some moderate Democrats like Manchin worries climate experts. Klaus Jacob, a research scientist at Columbia University’s Earth Institute who served for more than a decade on the New York City Panel of Climate Change, stresses that for new Glasgow commitments to have real impact, they’ll need to look beyond America’s borders.

“We’ve got to have a global plan that works both on the mitigation side, namely to reduce greenhouse gases as quickly as possible and get that financed internationally,” Jacob said, “and not just the main emitters — nations like the U.S., China, Brazil or Europe, and maybe India. But we also have to address it on the adaptation side, and just think about nations like Bangladesh or Vietnam, that have tens and hundreds of millions of people that by the end of the century will have to be moved.”

For many climate scientists, the mood ahead of Glasgow can best be described as one of grim realism. Despite that, many of those who spoke to Yahoo News also expressed a measure of optimism that human beings can still significantly slow climate change.
“We’re still where we were five or 10 years ago. You know, there’s a lot of pledges, there’s a lot of commitments that even then aren’t enough to solve the problem, but we aren’t really on track to meet a lot of those pledges that we’d previously made,” Swain said. “That's kind of the world that we live in right now, which is this tension between the fact that this is at a fundamental level a solvable problem, but we’ve so far not taken it seriously enough. I liken it more to being on a train, not a runaway train where the brakes don't work, but a train where the brakes are perfectly functional, but the conductor is just actively choosing not to apply them. So if we choose to apply the brakes, the train will slow down and come to a halt. But so far, we’re still just thinking about tapping the brakes lightly. It's not enough.”

Ben Adler contributed reporting to this story.

IF scenarios should be realistic. HK is small so establishing a good public transport network is easier with very high taxes on private vehicles. Same formula can't be applied everywhere.
About public transport please see the top of this post. Public transport works for a big country like India.

Privacy is connected. Family or people travelling together having private conversations can't really do so in public transport. I vape, so why should I give up that during commuting etc just to get on friggin public transport that costs more! Privacy, Costs and Comfort of citizens should not be bulldozed by commie inspired policies.
Come on, if a family is out on a trip, like I have been saying they can hire a cyclorotor camper which will have a kitchen and toilet. They can talk, fly and explore as much as they like. The aircraft will be computer controlled and will have situational sensors both things for stability and safety. But it is unreasonable and unrealistic for a family to travel to somewhere every morning and back every evening. Even now aren't there buses for students of educational institutions and for factory workers ( my late uncle would go in one ). Allowing personal transport cars and two-wheelers is wrong for the reasons I have written multiple times.
 

Verve

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Come on, if a family is out on a trip, like I have been saying they can hire a cyclorotor camper which will have a kitchen and toilet. They can talk, fly and explore as much as they like. The aircraft will be computer controlled and will have situational sensors both things for stability and safety. But it is unreasonable and unrealistic for a family to travel to somewhere every morning and back every evening. Even now aren't there buses for students of educational institutions and for factory workers ( my late uncle would go in one ). Allowing personal transport cars and two-wheelers is wrong for the reasons I have written multiple times.
Cyclowhatever is not here yet. It's buses and trains right now .. as I said before, IF scenarios need to be realistic .. and what you are proposing is anything but realistic.
 

jamahir

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Cyclowhatever is not here yet.
You should watch the two vids in the OP again and re-read the OP. The first vid is about the Austrian company CycloTech which has developed its first flying prototype of the cyclorotor. The company believed in the idea and put together human, financial and material resources to realize their idea. The second vid speaks of the long history of cyclorotors which didn't come about earlier because of multiple technological reasons but current developments make this idea possible now. The vid towards the end talks about a Russian project called CycloCar. Cyclocopters are the future ( near-future ) of public transport and other vehicles like for police and ambulance.

Only some years ago the quadcopter drones so common now were being experimented with. You yourself posted a personal quadcopter in the previous page. This ubiquity will be the same process for cyclorotors.

It's buses and trains right now .. as I said before, IF scenarios need to be realistic .. and what you are proposing is anything but realistic.
If conventional buses and taxis existed for so long then there was nothing unrealistic about expecting them to be the only methods of normal public transport. Not having banned the hundreds of millions of privately-owned personal transport vehicles throughout the world especially in China and in the developing countries like India and Pakistan has led to global pollution and enabling of so many wrongs - avoidable accidents, crime, disharmony and chaos.
 

The Accountant

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Such trips of super bikes is just asking for trouble ... I was saying that you could go for adventure bike route as there is a lot. Fuel is not a major issue if you carry the additional filter at tank fill and petrol cans. Many have travelled deep inside Baluchistan without any issues as such.
Yes i will definitely try someday ...
 

-=virus=-

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The middle class is the main problem. In India the main stay of the organized anti-human and anti-harmony rightwingers is the few hundred million middle class. The global middle class is the main problem.
You mean you don't want the new iPhone ? Look at this advert:


target segment: delivery boys.

it's good how capitalism has democratized technology, just check the deals on some of these phones, spl these festive days.

You should get a new bike on dhanteras, and a new phone.
 

jamahir

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You mean you don't want the new iPhone ? Look at this advert:


target segment: delivery boys.

it's good how capitalism has democratized technology, just check the deals on some of these phones, spl these festive days.
Sure, a phone costing 79,000 rupees to be sold to delivery boys who barely make ends meet. Which world do you live man ? On one of the TV channels there is a dance competition's promo about a food delivery boy who himself has to obtain food from a roadside langar. Once on Kaun Banega Crorepati there was a contestant from Maharashtra who wanted to enter a civil services exam I think and he was a delivery boy to make ends meet and lived with his parents in an under-construction building. His favorite food was biryani but he very rarely got to eat it, because he simply didn't have money to buy it. During his time on KBC the show got a packet for him.

it's good how capitalism has democratized technology
Yes we all know how Capitalism-enabled cell phone based and PC based WhatsApp, Facebook and Twitter are being used in India, not to spread hatred, rioting and lynching but harmony. :rolleyes:

You should get a new bike on dhanteras, and a new phone.
1. I hate motorbikes with the same passion as I hate dogs. And the reasoning I have given throughout this thread.

2. Why should I a Communist Muslim celebrate a Hindutvadi festival that is dedicated to money / Capitalism ?

3. My current phone is doing fine, thank you.
 

-=virus=-

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Sure, a phone costing 79,000 rupees to be sold to delivery boys who barely make ends meet. Which world do you live man ? On one of the TV channels there is a dance competition's promo about a food delivery boy who himself has to obtain food from a roadside langar. Once on Kaun Banega Crorepati there was a contestant from Maharashtra who wanted to enter a civil services exam I think and he was a delivery boy to make ends meet and lived with his parents in an under-construction building. His favorite food was biryani but he very rarely got to eat it, because he simply didn't have money to buy it. During his time on KBC the show got a packet for him.
It's good technology, makes life easy... people are willing to pay for good stuff. Don't see anything wrong in it, don't want it ? don't buy it.. simple.. why begrudge others for their choices ?

Guess in your utopia world everyone will be just as rich and famous as Amitabh Bachchan ? 😄

1. I hate motorbikes with the same passion as I hate dogs. And the reasoning I have given throughout this thread.

2. Why should I a Communist Muslim celebrate a Hindutvadi festival that is dedicated to money / Capitalism ?

3. My current phone is doing fine, thank you.
1. What if someone gifted you a puppy and a Honda Goldwing to go around traveling our great India ?

1635434327719.png

1635434423887.png


2. don't those two terms run afoul of each other on more than a few core ideological levels ? (don't reply, that discussion is forbidden here)

3. get a good new gaming phone and a 4k TV, Diwali deals won't last forever.. then you'll have to wait till Holi for such deals.
 

El Sidd

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Paul2

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So what could be the form of the intra-city buses and taxis ? There is a good new development in vehicles called Cyclorotors which are aircraft that in modern form have electric motors attached to four hubs at the sides and the hubs have movable blades and when the hubs are spun the blades I think create a force that lift the aircraft and move it forward. The below vid was made known to me credit @Hamartia Antidote. It is a test vehicle from the Austrian company CycloTech and of course I think in full form the hubs will be enclosed with a mesh for safety :

Such a vehicle could not only be used for buses and taxis but also for police vehicles, ambulances and food and groceries delivery vehicles. The fuel for these vehicles can remain petrol which can power the electric motors until the time that new longlife battery technologies like the NDB or research into how the electric eel produces up to 860 volts with a power to stun or even kill crocodiles, do not come about. At 05:21 mins in the below vid there is a visualization of a Russian project called CycloCar which can carry six people or 600 kgs of cargo and has a range of 500 kms with a top speed of 250 kmph :

I think ground vehicles for most things are passe and the future is of the Cyclorotor. And there's no point holding two-yearly climate change conferences if the biggest source of pollution - privately-owned personal transport - is not banned.

---

@fitpOsitive @Bilal9 @Indos @ps3linux others.
PFFFF that thing will fall out of the sky at a first gust.

It's a scam.
 

jamahir

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PFFFF that thing will fall out of the sky at a first gust.

It's a scam.
No, the cyclorotor is said to be more resistant to gusts and cross winds than the quadcopter that currently is the fashion for air taxis and personal transport ( see post# 65 of one flying over a desert and hovering ). The cyclorotor is the future of a good percentage of public transportation.

Visit the website of CycloTech, the Austrian company that is developing the cyclorotor in the OP.
 

Paul2

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No, the cyclorotor is said to be more resistant to gusts and cross winds than the quadcopter that currently is the fashion for air taxis and personal transport ( see post# 65 of one flying over a desert and hovering ). The cyclorotor is the future of a good percentage of public transportation.
It isn't, and I tell this because I know how it works.
 

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