• Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Karam Utshab concludes in Sylhet

Discussion in 'Bangladesh Defence Forum' started by bluesky, Sep 12, 2019.

  1. bluesky

    bluesky SENIOR MEMBER

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    https://www.thedailystar.net/arts-entertainment/event/news/karam-utshab-concludes-sylhet-1798678

    12:00 AM, September 12, 2019 / LAST MODIFIED: 12:58 AM, September 12, 2019
    Karam Utshab concludes in Sylhet
    [​IMG]

    Mintu Deshwara

    The indigenous communities of the tea gardens in Sylhet celebrated their largest traditional festival, Karam Utshab, with a call for the enactment of a law to protect their tradition, culture, language and environment. The festival began on Thursday and concluded on Tuesday, at Khan Tea Garden under the Jayantapur upazila of Sylhet.

    People from different districts attended the festival and performed their rituals. On the opening night, the community people, led by the chief, prayed under the ‘Holy Karam’ tree. They brought out a colourful procession, accompanied by dance, songs and traditional instruments. They paraded across different villages, to which they belong.

    A discussion meeting, organised by Sujit Baraik, a resident of Khan Tea Garden, was also held on Monday night, where indigenous priest, Angat Baraik, led the festival. He said that young girls observed a fast from dawn to dusk, on the first day of the festival. During the afternoon of the fourth day, the youths went out from the village in a colourful procession to collect branches of the Karam tree from their vicinity. The girls took the branches back to their village, while the boys joined them to sing and dance.


    At sunset, an altar was built, where they planted the branches of the Karam tree. Young men and women danced around the altar when the branches were being planted according to their ritual. Later, a puja began, where the priest recited verses explaining the significance of the festival. The event ended on Tuesday morning, through the immersion of branches of the Karam tree in the local canal.

    AFM Zakaria, Head of the Anthropology Department in Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, attended the programme as the chief guest. He said that Karam Utshab is one of the major festivals celebrated by the tea gardens’ indigenous families. It is a way for them to express their affinity towards nature. However, the unique culture is on the verge of extinction. Zakaria claimed that the government should enact a law to protect the tradition, culture and language of the communities to preserve the heritage.
     
  2. Abu Shaleh Rumi

    Abu Shaleh Rumi FULL MEMBER

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    Nice.
    Man these peoples are real chutiya. We gave them equality, now they want special treatment! They need to behave themselves...
     
  3. bluesky

    bluesky SENIOR MEMBER

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    I do not know what other special privileges do they want except that the protection of their traditions. It is not that much. It can be guaranteed without losing our own.
     
  4. bluesky

    bluesky SENIOR MEMBER

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    https://bdnews24.com/business/2019/...s-it-reveals-in-drive-for-slave-free-sourcing

    Bangladesh is among Unilever’s tea suppliers, it reveals in drive for slave-free sourcing
    >> Thomson Reuters Foundation

    Published: 12 Sep 2019 09:34 PM BdST Updated: 12 Sep 2019 09:34 PM BdST


    • [​IMG]
      File Photo: A worker picking tea leaves at a garden at Moulvibazar in Sylhet. Photo: asaduzzaman pramanik/ bdnews24.com
    Consumer goods giant Unilever on Thursday released a list of its global tea suppliers, including Bangladesh, bolstering a drive to stamp out worker exploitation and modern-day slavery on plantations.

    The move by the Anglo-Dutch food group - which buys 10 percent of the world's tea supply and owns at least a dozen major brands from PG Tips to Lipton - followed a charity campaign that successfully saw Britain's six top tea firms reveal such data.

    The campaign by advocacy group Traidcraft Exchange began last year to improve working conditions and pay in Assam, India, where research by activists and academics has shown many tea pickers are paid below minimum wage and live in poverty.

    "Unilever's decision to publish its global supplier list gives the women who pick the tea we drink more power to push for better pay and conditions, wherever they work," Traidcraft Exchange's policy adviser Tom Wills said in a statement.

    "Making the supplier list public means tea workers can complain directly to a global brand when standards fall short of what is being advertised to western consumers," he added.

    About 25 million people are estimated to be trapped in forced labour, from farms to factories, the United Nations says.

    As the world strives to meet a UN global goal of ending the $150 billion-a-year crime by 2030, consumers worldwide are increasingly demanding to know whether the products they buy - from T-shirts to tea - are free from modern-day slavery.

    The data published by Unilever revealed that it uses tea suppliers in countries including India, Bangladesh, China, Argentina, Turkey, Uganda and Indonesia.

    "With transparency comes transformation," said Mick Van Ettinger, Unilever's executive vice president for beverages.

    "We're determined to make our tea supply chain even more socially and environmentally sustainable, from tea estate to tea pot, and this is a great step to help us do that."

    Yet academics and business pressure groups have previously told the Thomson Reuters Foundation that abuses do not stop due to greater transparency alone, and called for action from better dialogue with workers to the introduction of a fair living wage.

    [This story has been recast from a Thomson Reuters Foundation report to highlight that Bangladesh is one of the global tea suppliers of Unilever]