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KAEC to have 2m people, projects worth $100bn on completion: CEO

mahatir

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You are very much welcome. I am sure that we well see Indians around once completed.

KSA is currently building so many huge projects, from expanding the holy sites in Islam in Makkah and Madinah to building top modern metros, top modern railways connecting the huge country, the worlds highest skyscraper (Kingdom Tower) a little bit outside of Jeddah along the beautiful Red Sea coast, King Abdullah Financial city in Riyadh (currently one of the biggest skyscraper projects in the world) etc.

Or all the industrial/economic cities.

I can recommend you to take a look at this thread below if interested:

GCC States Economy & Development | Page 5

The solar plants are also a work in process and other alternative energy forms.

Excellent , it is good KSA is moving towards full diversification
 

al-Hasani

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Excellent , it is good KSA is moving towards full diversification
Sure it is. UAE is doing excellent on that field as well as you know already. Even better so do to having started earlier and being a much, much smaller country and population with less challenges.
 

Bubblegum Crisis

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@ Al-Hasani

Sorry ! I was extremely busy. ^^


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“These big projects need vision, strength and guts to do. They are transformational and have an impact”.

Al Waleed bin Talal bin Abdulaziz al Saud





Saudi Urban Projects Are a Window to Modernity

By Nicolai Ouroussoff
Published: December 12, 2010

JIDDA, Saudi Arabia —
Just off a desert road about an hour’s drive from this port city, an enormous arched gate capped by three domes rises out of the sand like the set for a 1920s silent film fantasy. It is, instead, a fantasy of contemporary urban planning, the site of what one day will be King Abdullah Economic City, a 65-square-mile development at the edge of the Red Sea. With a projected population of two million, the city is a Middle Eastern version of the “special economic zones” that have flourished in places like China.

The city is one of four being laid out on empty desert around this country, all scheduled for completion by 2030. They follow on the heels of the country’s first coeducational university, which opened last year next to the King Abdullah site, and a financial district nearly the size of Lower Manhattan that is rising on the outskirts of the capital, Riyadh.

Architecturally they couldn’t be more dreary and conventional — bloated glass towers encircled by quaint town houses and suburban villas decorated in ersatz historical styles. Their gargantuan scale and tabula rasa approach conjure old-style Modernist planning efforts like the creation of Brasília in the 1950s or the colossal Soviet urban experiments of the 1930s, but these are driven by anxiety over the future, not utopian idealism.

With more than 13 million Saudis — half the population — under 20, the 86-year-old Saudi ruler, King Abdullah, is trying to create more than a million new jobs and 4 million homes within 10 to 15 years. He and his royal clan envision an economy less dependent on oil, run by a new class of doctors, engineers and businessmen who can function in a global marketplace.

To accomplish this feat the Saudi government says it needs to crack the door open to some sort of Western-style modernity — or at least a softer version of the Islam practiced here, with its strictly enforced separation of the sexes, its severe restrictions on the public lives of women and the ever watchful eye of the religious police.

The idea is to create islands from which change would seep out, drop by drop, without antagonizing powerful conservative forces within the country.

If the plan works, at best it would transform Saudi Arabia into a technologically advanced society controlled by a slightly more tolerant religious autocracy. Or it could provoke militant violence and government crackdowns.

“What they are trying to do is very difficult,” said Bernard Haykel, a professor of Near Eastern studies at Princeton University who has written extensively on Saudi Arabia. “Someone telling you to go pray — that in-your-face religion — that’s not going to be permitted in these cities. It’s a more ecumenical Islam. But it’s a slippery slope. Once you start, you’ve basically opened up the door to a certain degree of diversity and tolerance.”


Urban Fortresses

In many ways Saudi Arabia looks like a modern country. Riyadh was laid out on a rationalist urban grid in the 1960s by Constantinos Doxiadis, a postwar Modernist planner. King Fahd Road, its main axis, is a multilane highway that cuts the city in two and is dotted with recognizable landmarks: Kingdom Center, a skyscraper known as “the bottle opener” because of a triangular hole at the top, designed by the American firm Ellerbe Becket; Norman Foster’s pointy Al Faisaliah tower; and the headquarters of the Interior Ministry, a menacing upside-down concrete pyramid that looms just off the main strip.

Underneath the modern gloss, however, the city’s architecture reflects the strictures of the Saudis’ severe Wahhabi brand of Islam. Public parks — where men and women might mingle — are few; restaurants have separate dining areas for men and women; banks have separate entrances; and cinemas are banned. Many windows are covered by modern versions of mashrabiyas, traditional latticework screens, to ensure privacy. Men and women avoid riding elevators together. The most open public spaces are hotel lobbies, where women sometimes show their faces.

When I visited recently, the steel frames of the financial district’s first towers could be seen rising at the city’s northern edge, just beyond a ring road. According to the government, this will one day be the financial center of the entire Middle East, and the design blends elements of Wall Street, La Défense in Paris, and Canary Wharf in London into a kind of generic financial theme park.

At the heart of the plan is Financial Plaza, a sterile limestone square framed by a stock exchange and several bank towers. (One of the tallest is named the World Trade Center.) These will be surrounded by more corporate towers, nearly 50 in all, that will stand at irregular angles to one another and rise out of a two-story retail base linked by skywalks. A monorail will loop through the site, with stops at a planned children’s museum, a science exhibition center and the country’s first aquarium.

The public spaces are closer in spirit to Las Vegas than to Riyadh. An elaborate pedestrian promenade will zigzag through the site, flanked by a narrow reflecting pool intended to conjure a traditional wadi, the mostly dry riverbed that runs through desert valleys. Branches of the “wadi” will connect to small public squares that the architects envision as social meeting places.

Even more striking is that the design guidelines say nothing about the separation of the sexes. Jacob Kurek, a partner at Henning Larsen, architects of the master plan, showed me apartment layouts no different from those in a standard residential high rise in New York or London. Many have floor-to-ceiling windows, allowing people to stare directly into them.

Meanwhile the seven mosques that were part of the original master plan have been reduced by more than half, and most of the daily worship will take place in public prayer rooms tucked into buildings.

“None of the religious issues came into the design in any way,” Mr. Kurek said. “They want to attract a bit of both Westerners and young Saudis who have traveled abroad, in order to integrate them.”

But this integration stops at the district’s edge. Highways surround the site, isolating it within rivers of traffic. Many of the meandering streets created by the wadi dead-end in cul-de-sacs, adding to the feeling of disconnection from the street grid of Riyadh. Most people will enter by car, parking on one of four underground levels and riding elevators to street level. Once inside they will walk among buildings through more than two miles of air-conditioned skywalks, a vision that seems to have been airlifted from cold-war-era Houston.

In part the district’s isolation stems from the Saudis’ security concerns. The master plan lays out the advantages of an “island site” that would allow authorities to restrict comings and goings as well as to shut down the entire district if there is a security alert. (A similar plan is being designed for ground zero in Manhattan.)

As important, however, is that the isolation of the site will keep its vision of modernity from close contact with Riyadh’s strictly monitored society, at least too soon. When it is completed, sometime in 2012, the Financial District will be its own world. Over the next decade, as the city grows around it, and the country continues to modernize, the two would become more closely integrated. Eventually, they expect, it will be linked to central Riyadh by a tram system.


A Test for Integration

King Abdullah Economic City — KAEC (pronounced “cake”), as the Saudi government calls it — is envisioned as another island of relative liberalism within Saudi Arabia. For now, just beyond the gate, a roadway flanked by shrubs, palm trees and the occasional billboard of King Abdullah extends through miles of empty desert. At its far end the first stages of development rise: some tinted glass corporate office buildings, a long row of town houses and a pedestrian boardwalk overlooking the turquoise waters of the Red Sea.

According to the agency in charge of developing the economic cities, this cluster of buildings will blossom into a walled city with 400,000 apartments, town houses and villas; a central business district; an industrial zone; a 250-acre university campus; and one of the world’s largest and most technologically advanced ports.

“The whole objective is job creation,” said Amr al-Dabbagh, the agency’s governor. “The biggest oil refinery produces at most 1,500 jobs. We will produce a million.”

Despite the occasional Islamic-style embellishments — a villa with an arched entryway, a trellised porch — the developments bring to mind the camps built here by Aramco, the American oil conglomerate, for its executives and workers in the 1950s and ’60s. Like this new city those camps were sealed enclaves, re-creations of American-style subdivisions complete with front lawns, backyard barbecues and baseball diamonds. And they followed what were known as “Aramco rules”: women were allowed to walk around unveiled, drive cars and mingle with men.

But KAEC is Aramco with a twist. Conceived on a larger scale, economically and socially more diverse, it aims to draw a range of Western corporations and their employees, as well as their expertise, to create a social mixing chamber. The core of the city will be a business district much like the one on the outskirts of Riyadh. Residential areas will be interlaced with the kind of open public spaces — parks, plazas and the waterfront promenades — that are generic in large Western-style developments but almost impossible to find in Saudi Arabia.

Artists’ renderings of the project show couples happily strolling around the city dressed in an ambiguous mix of Islamic and Western styles. A video of the future university has women, their heads covered but otherwise in Western-looking dress, mingling with men on campus. To encourage more foreign companies and their employees to come here, the government will allow foreign ownership for the first time. And officials say the city will have a streamlined bureaucracy, so that unlike in other Saudi cities, where delays can make even the simplest transactions stretch out for days, action on visas or customs documents will take just an hour.

Ahmed Osilan, Mr. Dabbagh’s chief of staff, explained the difference between King Abdullah Economic City and the old Aramco camps this way: It is “not an Aramco town — it will have a mix of foreigners and nationals — but Aramco rules.” He added, “The coeducation, the mixing — they’re tools for bringing about various changes the king wants.”

Eventually KAEC is supposed to be joined by three other cities: Knowledge Economic City on the outskirts of Medina, the burial place of Muhammad and one of the Arab world’s holiest cities; Prince Abdulaziz bin Mousaed Economic City, 450 miles north of Riyadh, which will focus on agribusiness; and Jazan Economic City, intended to provide industrial jobs to Saudis living near the border of Yemen, a stronghold of Al Qaeda that has become one of the most volatile areas in the Middle East.

“The economic cities are unique,” Mr. Osilan said, explaining the government’s thinking. “They are contained developments. Should they succeed they will be contagious to the neighboring region. Should they fail it is still contained.”


A Fine Line

But that kind of containment may be difficult in the age of Facebook and Twitter. Only a year ago the king attended the opening of Saudi Arabia’s first coeducational graduate school, the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, a 10-minute drive from the King Abdullah site. From the desert outside, the campus looks like a military encampment: 800 acres surrounded by a ring road and a concrete and steel wall.

Inside, I was told, the development is organized around a town square that links the university buildings to a residential area for up to 25,000 people. There are no strict religious dress codes — women can walk around in shorts if they choose — and anyone can drive. Aramco rules.

Yet soon after the campus opened, a two-minute video showing men and women dancing in the school’s cafeteria made its way to YouTube, outraging religious hard-liners. When a member of the Saudi Council of Senior Scholars, Sheik Saad al-Shathry, openly criticized the university, calling it evil, the king promptly fired him. Security was beefed up, and people involved in the project were forbidden to speak to the news media about “social issues” regarding the university — meaning women. Trying to visit, I drove through an obstacle course of security bollards before being turned away at the front gate.

The clampdown underscores the delicate game the government is playing. “There has been resistance since the 1960s to any innovations that are deemed too Western — to television, to girls’ education,” said F. Gregory Gause III, a specialist in Middle Eastern politics at the University of Vermont. “But that hasn’t stopped them from happening. Even the most conservative sheik drives an S.U.V. and has a nice house. He’s not living in the desert in a tent.” At the same time, he went on to say, a thirst for the material luxuries that the modern world can provide can’t be equated with demands for political rights — something that he doesn’t see happening here soon.

“Even lots of women are afraid of change,” said Eman al-Najaf, a 31-year-old Saudi who blogs about women’s issues here. “Women who have been educated have been educated to stay the same. They’ve been brainwashed and prefer to live in their comfort zone.”

Several people here expressed outrage that the government was pouring billions of dollars into the creation of entire new cities while large areas of existing ones had deteriorated into slums. Jidda, for example, already has a port in desperate need of upgrading. Its historic center is a medieval slum inhabited by foreign laborers. The city has no sewer system, only septic tanks that regularly spill into the streets. And people who live there will have to continue living by the old rules.

“Here you have a long historical pattern of settlement,” said a local architect, Tariq Alireza, expressing a frustration I encountered again and again here. “There is an inordinate amount of vacant land. Why not solve our problems? Why not fix the port in Jidda? We’re not Saudi Arabia? What law will apply here?”

If the government’s vision fails — if it cannot manage the forces of liberalism within its planned developments — it could set off more intense clashes with militant forces that could ripple across the Middle East and the West. A more likely outcome is that, as resistance from the country’s conservative religious establishment grows, the government will ratchet up its mechanisms of oppression.

But an even bigger danger, some say, may be that the government won’t move forward at all.

“You’re looking at decades,” Mr. Haykel said. “If these cities don’t work, and they can’t produce jobs and, say, the price of oil drops, you could have masses of people mobilizing against the government, and it could take the form of religious extremism. But in the long run if they don’t produce an economy that’s not dependent on oil, the country itself becomes unviable. I don’t know how they would be able to sustain life there. It’s an end-of-the-world scenario.”

The New York Times
KAFD (King Abdullah Financial District) – 2013
Nov. 2013







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Islamic economic to conquer the world

GCC States Economy & Development | Page 3

GCC States Economy & Development | Page 3

GCC States Economy & Development | Page 4

GCC States Economy & Development | Page 4

GCC States Economy & Development | Page 4

GCC States Economy & Development | Page 4




KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) – 2013








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GCC States Economy & Development

GCC States Economy & Development | Page 2

GCC States Economy & Development | Page 5




King Abdullah slaps down Saudi cleric criticial of co-ed university

By Asma Alsharif
October 5, 2009


Well, that didn’t take long.

Last week, a senior Saudi Islamic cleric criticised the country’s first mixed-gender university, the King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST), and suggested an Islamic committee to make sure it followed Islamic principled and didn’t teach “alien ideologies” such as evolution.

Late on Sunday, the state news agency SPA reported that King Abdullah had removed Sheikh Saad Al-Shithri from a top council of religious scholars.

Al-Shithri’s comments sparked angry reactions from liberals who saw the new university as a beacon for research that will eventually produce Saudi scientists, spearheading modernity in the conservative Islamic State. For those of you who read Arabic, here’s a sample of several op-ed pieces that ran in the daily Okaz.

“This is a strategy for the conservatives to control the university. Or at least to have a major say in it. This is the old trick for them to have the upper hand to sabotage reforms,” said Jamal Khashoggi, editor-in-chief of Alwatan daily newspaper, about the clerics comments on the university.

Saudi Arabia follows an austere version of Islam and religious police patrol the streets ensuring that the country’s strict segregation laws are implemented. Clerics like Al-Shitri have a major influence on school curricula as well as the judicial system and some have issued fatwas against co-education (here in Arabic).

Since coming to power in 2005, King Abdullah has reshuffled the cabinet, replacing some hardline clerics with more moderate ones, and promised the overhaul of the education system with an aim of focusing more on sciences rather than religion. He has also pledge to reform the judicial system.

“This university has become a reality, and it is for the good of the nation as the King had wanted it to be. It is not a cake that the two ideological streams [liberals and conservatives] can compete over,” wrote columnist Khaled Alsulaiman in Okaz after the controversial statements placed KAUST in the centre of the battle between liberals and conservatives.

“This university is not a project for Westernization, as some hope it would be while others fear it might be. It is a genuine scientific project that came at a sensitive and crucial time in this nation’s age,” he added.

KAUST is located near the Red Sea village of Thuwal, north of Jeddah, away from the prying eyes of the religious police. The government has promised academic freedom for the university but diplomats predicted — and Shithri has demonstrated — that clerics would try to obstruct the project.

Reuters

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Abdullah of Saudi Arabia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Saudi Arabian National Guard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Wonderful… ^^



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Bubblegum Crisis

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KSA Industrial cities

In a country covering 2 million sq km, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) offers investors a wide choice of sites well-suited to industry and industrial support.

The Royal Commission for Jubail and Yanbu (RCJY) is responsible for the management and development of major industrial sites at Jubail on the Arabian Gulf coast, covering 1,016 sq km; and Yanbu on the Red Sea coast, covering 187 sq km. To date, a total of $144 billion of public and private investment at the two sites has created around 107,000 jobs.

The Saudi Industrial Property Authority (Modon) is managing and developing 93 sq km of land in 24 industrial cities. The largest of these is Sudair Industrial City, a 26 sq km development 120 km north of Riyadh. In all, over 300,000 people work in leased and owned premises at Modon sites.

Modon-approved and -licensed private companies are developing six additional private industrial cities: Obaikan, Water and Energy, Fanar, Al-Ajaimi, Industrial Gate and Rabigh.

Sponsored by Saudi Aramco and Sumitomo Chemical, Rabigh Conversion Industrial Park (Rabigh CIP) extends over 240 hectares. Strategically located near both the PetroRabigh refinery and petrochemical complex, and King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC), Rabigh CIP aims to attract foreign, Saudi and international joint-venture tenants in plastics conversion and related industries.

KAEC is the largest of four new, largely privately funded economic cities in KSA. The Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) is leading the development of these cities, aiming to: generate $150 billion of economic output a year; promote balanced regional development; help diversify the economy; create over a million new jobs; and accommodate 4.5 million people.

Costing $86 billion and covering 168 sq km, KAEC is located on KSA's Red Sea coast, 40 km from Rabigh. It will provide around 1 million jobs and will be home to 2 million people by 2025.

KAEC's new port will have an initial capacity of 5 million containers a year (twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU)), and ultimately 20 million TEU, plus facilities to handle passengers, dry bulk and general cargo.

The city will also include: a 63 sq km industrial zone, part of which will be dedicated to developing and producing plastics for the automotive, biomedical, construction and food packaging industries; a railway station; a multi-university campus for 18,000 students; two water desalination plants; two power plants; and an aluminium smelter.

KAEC will be served by Haramain high-speed trains, which will link the western cities of Medina, Jeddah and Mecca from 2012. Built for 320 km/h operations, the Haramain line is expected to carry 6 million passengers in 2014, increasing later to 12 million a year.

At Obhur, between KAEC and Jeddah, the planned 1,600-metre (one mile) high Kingdom Tower will be the world's tallest building.

Also near KAEC, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) is a well-respected research and teaching university with around 800 postgraduate students.

Located in Hail, north-central Saudi Arabia, Prince Abdulaziz Bin Mousaed Economic City (PABMEC) will include an airport for 3 million passengers and railway station for 2 million passengers a year, and a major logistics centre. PABMEC will cost $8 billion, cover 156 sq km, provide 55,000 jobs and accommodate 300,000 people.

Focused on knowledge and culture, Medina's $7 billion Knowledge Economic City (KEC) will have a population of 150,000 and provide 20,000 jobs. Covering only 4.8 sq km, KEC is not targeting industrial development but can accommodate R&D and other industrial support activities.

Medina is easily accessible: its Prince Mohammad Bin Abdulaziz International Airport is being expanded and will have a capacity of 14 million passengers a year by 2016.

Extending over 108 sq km and costing $27 billion, Jazan Economic City (JEC) is 60 km from Jizan on the Red Sea coast, in south-western KSA. JEC will include an airport for up to 3 million passengers a year, a port, power and water desalination plant, oil refinery and integrated petrochemical complex, and steel and aluminium plants. It will provide some 100,000 jobs and will be home to 300,000 people.

Across KSA, municipalities also offer investors leasable land to house small industrial projects.


2013 National Industrial Clusters Development Program

Source : Industrial cities

KAEC






KAEC seaport (Phase One)

KAEC city real beginning project… Where is my port ? MY PORT… ^^


KAEC seaport operational by early 2013

23 May 2011

JEDDAH:
The first phase of dredging in King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) seaport has been completed, Fahd Al-Rasheed, managing director & CEO of Emaar The Economic City (EEC), and Board Member of Ports Development Company (PDC), said.

In the phase, three million cubic meters of dredging was completed, including the dredging of the entry channel to the port and the turning basin. The second phase of development is already underway which will include finishing the remaining dredging, constructing the berths, the stack yards, and the operations buildings. The target is to prepare KAEC seaport to start receiving the first shipping lines by early 2013.

Al-Rasheed said the port will have 18 meters of depth at the berth side making it capable to receive the new generation mega vessels. The total area of KAEC seaport will extend over 13 million sqm, enabling KAEC seaport to significantly uplift the level of the Kingdom’s competitiveness via enhancing maritime transport and logistics services. "KAEC seaport is one of the key components of King Abdullah Economic City," Al Rasheed noted. "Its strategic location and direct access to the Industrial Valley will attract companies from various industries and will create many new job opportunities. It will be an ideal location to reach the 250 million consumers in the Middle East and North Africa."

KAEC seaport is being developed by the Ports Development Company (PDC), which is a joint venture between Emaar, the Economic City (EEC) and Saudi Bin Laden Group (SBG). The company, is in charge of financing, developing, and operating KAEC seaport. The contractor working on KAEC seaport has invested more than SR700 million (187 million US dollar) on heavy equipment needed to build an international port of this size, which includes one of the biggest marine dredgers in the world. The dredger is working non-stop with an engine power of 22,500 horsepower and a production capacity of more than 10 million cubic meters per year. In addition, a huge floating crane with a payload capacity of approximately 1,400 tons will be used for the installation of the large pieces of ready-casting concrete.











First phase of KAEC's huge port to open in Q3

on Jun 4, 2013


Emaar The Economic City, the company building the huge new King Abdullah Economic City project, has said that it expects to begin trial operations at the huge new 14km2 seaport during the third quarter of 2013.

In an update of its activities to the Saudi stock exchange, Emaar TEC said that the port will initially handle up to 1.3m TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent container units).

A company has been set up to continue the development of the port, which will eventually spread across 20km2 of land and have the capacity to handle 20m TEU - making it one of the top 20 container ports in the world.

The new company will invest around $800m in the development, maintenance and operation of the new city's port. Emaar TEC will own a 34% stake in the new company, with the remaining 66% in the hands of contractor Saudi BinLadin Group.


ConstructionWeekOnline




2011









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Bubblegum Crisis

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Shipping lines now prefer KAEC port

JEDDAH: MD Al-Helali
Published — Wednesday 5 June 2013


Global shipping lines have begun shifting their operations from Jeddah Islamic Port to King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) in Rabigh to avoid delays and bottlenecks.

Hani Tarabulsi, a shipping agent, revealed that a number of shipping companies have requested to shift their operations to Rabigh. “With every new season, the Jeddah Islamic Port management faces a wave of criticism for delays and accumulation of goods at the port,” he said.

“The operation of ports requires constant efforts,” he said, explaining that in the case of Jeddah Islamic Port, importers and clearance agents trade blames for the recurring crises. He said that the delays lead to price hikes in consumer goods to augment additional cost of fines and storage facilities.

Arabnews
MSC launches vessel operations at King Abdullah Port

2013-10-21
(Source: Alphaliner)


Saudi Arabia's latest maritime project, the new King Abdullah Port on the central Red Sea, has made rapid progress in the recent past and is now nearing completion. Trial operations at the new greenfield port - desert port would be a more fitting term - have already begun with regular calls of MSC's and CSAV's Europe - Middle East IPAK service (3533). A few weeks ago, MSC even sent the 13,050 teu MSC RAPALLO to the port for a test call. Another major customer is on the horizon for 2014, when the P3 alliance will begin weekly calls on two mainline Europe to Far East loops.

The new seaport, located some 100 kilometres north of Jeddah, is part of the larger King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) project, presently under development on a 168 square kilometre site. The lead partner in the port is now TIL (Terminal Investments Limited), a Dutch-registered sister company of MSC.

King Abdullah Port is scheduled to start commercial operations in 2014 with 700 metres of pier wall and with an annual capacity of 1.3 Mteu. Additional construction phases will double this to 1,400 metres and 2.7 Mteu. The new terminal offers a deep draft and it is fitted with equipment to handle ultra-large container vessels.










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Bubblegum Crisis

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Industrial Valley










KAEC, SSH in deal over Industrial Valley-Phase 2

Last updated: Monday, August 05, 2013 2:20 PM

JEDDAH –
King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) recently signed a contract with Salem Saleh Al-Hareth Est. (SSH) to perform grading and earthworks for the Second Phase of the Industrial Valley “IV II”. Al-Hareth is one of the Saudi leading and specialized trade and contracting company. The project was awarded for a cost of SR 66 million ($17.6 million) and is scheduled to be completed by February 2014.

The signing contract was between Fahd Al-Rasheed, Managing Director and CEO of KAEC Leslie Jameson, General Manager of SSH.

Al-Rasheed said: “Salem Saleh Al-Hareth Est. was selected among other contractors because of its long experience and in-depth knowledge in infrastructure, its insurance for speed of delivery, maintaining the highest degree of accuracy, reliability and complying with the highest international standards.”

Moreover, he said “KAEC supports investors and venture capitalists willing to invest in the Industrial Valley with a variety of owning and long-term leasing options. This enables them to benefit from many of the main services offered by the city, for instance, the ease of issuing permits and licenses, and the possibility of providing qualified manpower through training centers for Saudi talents. The availability of housing solutions within the vicinity of the Industrial Valley and the direct link with King Abdullah Seaport makes the Industrial Valley a global logistical hub and an access point to reach about 250 million consumers in the Middle East and North Africa, not to mention the availability of Haramain Railway station in KAEC and the future land bridge.”

Al-Hareth said: “We are committed to provide our expertise to design and develop an advanced industrial environment with effective and tangible results for the region and the world while providing the highest standards of infrastructure. With over 20 years of experience in infrastructure, SSH is one of the Saudi Aramco approved contractors for executing infrastructure projects over the amount of SR 370 million.”

King Abdullah Economic City recently launched phase II of the Industrial Valley on an area of 22 million sq.m. after the completion of the 3.5 million sq.m phase I development with all infrastructure. The IV is currently a location magnet to local and global industrial and leading businesses.


Saudi Gazette
13 companies reserve lands in KAEC

JEDDAH: Arab News
Published — Tuesday 1 January 2013



As part of the expansion plans at King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) and in an attempt to accelerate the pace of construction work, negotiations with 13 international and local companies for investments in the city has been launched recently. The companies have reserved lands of different dimensions in KAEC’s Industrial Valley, with the total estimated at 2 million square meters. Year 2013 will see the production launch of four factories. With two manufacturers having launched in 2010, this will bring the total number of producing factories to six in the next period.

Meanwhile, the KAEC seaport will start receiving ships by mid-2013. It has currently completed the reception procedures.

“There are 36 national and foreign companies that have signed contracts for industrial investment at KAEC Industrial Valley,” Ahmed Linjawi, president of KAEC services and industrial division, told a local newspaper. The total investment value of the contracts exceeds SR 10 billion on a total area of nearly 9 million sq. m. “In addition to that, we have reached a tentative contract agreement with 13 companies that will be translated into a final contract soon,” he said.

Linjawi declared that KAEC had succeeded in accelerating the pace of implementation and construction work, given that 11 companies obtained building permits from the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA).

“SAGIA, which based its headquarters in King Abdullah Economic City, has succeeded in providing a superior investment climate and services according to the highest standards, such as a comprehensive service center that offers all services to owners and investors, he said.

The ongoing industrial projects at KAEC Industrial Valley include logistic services, the investments of which cover an area of 2,313,590 sq. m, besides projects in the field of consumer goods manufacturing on an area of 436,037 sq. m. Moreover, the steel complex project will cover an area of 4,300,006 sq. m, and multiple projects in the field of construction and building materials cover an area of 1,065,448 sq. m. Five pharmaceutical industry projects occupy an area of 696,121 sq. meters, and an oil manufacturing project in addition to another project for manufacturing of plastic packaging materials will comprise an area of 295,803 sq. m, he said.

Linjawi declared that the growing demand for investment in the Industrial Valley pushed KAEC to proceed with the design of a general outline of the Industrial Valley’s second phase, with an area extended to more than 14 million sq. m. This area has been devoted to attracting investors in the medium and light industries, with the availability of integrated infrastructure and all utilities services such as water, power, sanitation, flood drainage channels, information technology services, and fiber optics.

The first phase of the Industrial Valley, which extends over an area of 3,600,000 sq. m, begun running phase A and will complete infrastructure phase B by the end of 2013.

Alongside the Industrial Valley, the KAEC seaport has almost completed its first construction phase. It is scheduled to begin traffic and receive ships by the end of 2013.

In addition to that, the Haramain High Speed Railway inside KAEC is one of the main attractions for investors and residents. It links KAEC with King Abdulaziz International Airport in 25 minutes and takes 70 minutes from Makkah to Medina. The railway is scheduled to launch operation in 2014.


One day, in the future, inevitably ‘KAEC’ and ‘Kingdom City Jeddah (KHC)’ will merge.





Continue... See old links:

KSA : Kingdom Tower (Mile-High Tower)







KAEC





KAEC station Al Haramain high speed train






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Bubblegum Crisis

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Life…






KAEC ready to begin final phase of Beach Community 2 land sales

Published — Friday 15 November 2013

Following the overwhelming success of the sales event in Riyadh, King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) is all set to launch the final phase of Beach Community 2 residential land plots at Al Murooj district in KAEC that will be held at Jeddah Hilton Hotel on Friday.

Beach Community 2 is situated on 680,000 sqm at Al Murooj district in KAEC. Residential land plots offer will vary in sizes ranging from 925 sqm to 3,000 sqm with an open 40 meter width of sea shores. In addition, the district enjoys a privileged lifestyle within an exclusive coastal community that offers world-class education, high quality health care, luxury retail outlets and an international standard golf course.

Buyers will be offered free-of-charge a choice of more than 20 pre-approved villa plans in the Arabian and Spanish architectural styles that characterize Al Murooj as a distinctive Mediterranean-type luxury coastal resort.

Potential buyers can start the registration process online.

Al Murooj district is considered the most prestigious of the KAEC coastal communities. Spread over 4.9 million sqm, the district consists of three focal areas — the Al Manazel townhouses, the Golf Communities surrounding with high standards golf course and the Beach Communities.

KAEC is one of the largest and most important private sector initiatives in the Middle East, encompassing a total area of 168 million sqm along the coast of the Red Sea. Through its Industrial Valley, KAEC has succeeded in attracting more than 60 national and international industrial companies.

Strategically located and with its own seaport, KAEC offers a wide range of housing solutions that are suitably priced for different income levels.


Arab News











Official links :

Life as it could be | King Abdullah Economic City

Al Talah Gardens | King Abdullah Economic City














:azn:


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al-Hasani

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KAEC launches phase 3 of Al-Talah Gardens
Last updated: Wednesday, December 18, 2013 8:42 PM



KING ABDULLAH ECONOMIC CITY — Following the hugely successful sales of land plots in Al-Talah Gardens phase 1 and 2, King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) launched the third phase of the residential project at Jeddah Hilton Hotel on Dec. 15-16.

The new residential land plots offered in Al-Talah Gardens phase 3 district are meant to meet the housing needs of the low and mid income sections of the Saudi community at competitive prices,” said Fahd Al-Rasheed, managing director and CEO of KAEC.

“Today we are announcing the launch of Al-Talah Gardens phase 3 with the same degree of credibility and transparency experienced by current land owners. The city is constantly growing and witnessing an increasing interest in real estate and residential projects from investors and tenants in the city as well as from neighboring areas such as Petro Rabigh, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), in addition to KAEC employees.”

Located at the heart of KAEC, Al-Talah Gardens has a total area of more than 1.100 million square meters, which will be fully serviced with infrastructure and amenities, including water networks, sewage systems, telecommunication network, safety, security, drainage network, electricity and lighting.

Al-Talah over looks two main roads; it offers a crescent park stretching nearly 1 km in length in the heart of Al-Talah Gardens district. The park also features walking and bicycle paths that meander through a naturally shaded garden landscape that connects people directly to the neighborhood center.

King Abdullah Economic City is one of the largest and most important private sector initiatives in the Middle East, encompassing a total area of 168 million square meters along the coast of the Red Sea. Through its industrial valley, KAEC has succeeded in attracting more than 60 national and international industrial companies. Strategically located and with its own seaport, KAEC offers a wide range of housing solutions that are suitably priced for different income levels.

The KAEC residential districts are supported by high quality infrastructure and a complete range of services and facilities such as The World Academy School, which is already open with a future capacity of 2,250 students, and a medical center for primary care and emergency operated by Dr. Soliman Fakeeh Hospital Company. In addition, retail stores have been fully leased and restaurants, cafes, sales outlets and pharmacies are already open.

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Alstom enters JV to build $64m factory in Saudi

by*CW Staff on Dec 3, 2013



French engineering giant Alstom has entered into a joint venture (JV) with Arabian Bemco Contracting Co. Ltd to build a $64m (SAR 240m) manufacturing facility near Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, which will produce power generation components.

Alstom Arabia Power Factory Ltd. will focus primarily on manufacturing heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) which are used in combined cycle and cogeneration applications to increase thermal cycle efficiency and minimise fuel consumption.

Following the establishment of the factory, a second phase to the partnership is planned which will see the scope of the factory expanded to other power generation equipment.

The factory is to be located in King Abdullah Economic City, north of Jeddah, and will train and employ hundreds of Saudi nationals from the outset.

Alstom enters JV to build $64m factory in Saudi | ConstructionWeekOnline.com



Petra Engineering new plant in KAEC



KING Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) launched Petra Engineering Industries Co. newest Saudi factory in industrial valley first phase on 42,000 m2, with SR30 million investments and 190 employees.
Fahd Al-Rasheed, Managing Director and CEO of KAEC, welcomed guests expressing his contentment to be present and see the fruitfulness of The Economic City departments' abundant efforts to draw external investments and encourage global industry and commerce to Saudi market and benefit the promising investments in KAEC.
Al Rasheed said: "Petra would benefit the sophisticated infrastructure in industrial valley and would be boosted by King Abdullah Sea Port and diverse means of transportation topped by Haramin train connecting KAEC with Jeddah, Makkah, Madinah and King Abdul Aziz Airport."
The new factory comes as the first in the kingdom and the third to Petra's factories in Jordan; Amman's in 1986 and Mafraq's in 2008. The new factory reflects Petra's commitment to strengthen its presence and expansion of investment in Saudi Arabia and the world.
Petra provides thousands of jobs in the field of air conditioning and refrigeration in more than 45 markets. Petra's key objective in inaugurating Saudi factory, is training and employing Saudi cadres giving them the opportunity for creativity and excel in serving kingdom in administrative, industrial and production as well as transferring experience of producing and manufacturing quality HVAC for the benefit of industrial and commercial purposes.
Petra Engineering is one of the major industrial companies in the region producing a large array of quality HVAC equipment including cooled water chillers (WPSa) (WRWC) and Ultra Low Noise Series, Central Consolidated and Separate Packages with diverse capacities, Air Handling units, Air Conditioning and computer rooms air conditioning units.
Eng. Omar Abu-Wishah, Deputy Chairman, said "backed with international certificates, high quality as well as the attention paid to details at all manufacturing stages and international certificates facilitated Petra Engineering to join US one of the most competitive markets."
Eng. Samir Hamed, General Manager Petra Arabia, praised KAEC factory and the progress achieved within the Economic City and said: " The phrase (Made in K.S.A. and specifically in KAEC) would be a new honor obtained by Petra Engineering during its thirty years of business. We are proud to be among of the first factories exporting from KAEC," he added.



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