• Saturday, July 11, 2020

Journalist Saleem Shahzad Abducted and found dead.

Discussion in 'Social & Current Events' started by crankthatskunk, May 30, 2011.

  1. crankthatskunk

    crankthatskunk SENIOR MEMBER

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    First the excerpts from an article by Saleem Shahzad in Asia times, which details some disturbing news of the book inside Pakistan Navy and resulted attacks on PN culminating in Mehran Base Attack.
    The problem is if the authorities knew why they didn’t tighten up the security at major naval bases?



     
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  2. crankthatskunk

    crankthatskunk SENIOR MEMBER

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    Second is another disturbing news, Saleem Shahzad the writer of the column in Asia Times online had disappeared. This could have serious repercussions, and indicate the drama is far from over. Are we expecting more attacks? There are some sinister games being played against Pakistan.

     
  3. Leader

    Leader ELITE MEMBER

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    the initial investigations suggest that the american contracts were involved in the attack on naval base...
     
  4. crankthatskunk

    crankthatskunk SENIOR MEMBER

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    Yes, leader I know about that news too. The Picture is murky, quicker Pakistanis dismantle this ring better for Pakistan. But who kidnapped Shahzad?

    As for American involvement, do you seriously think Pakistani Government has the guts to stand up and declare it to the world?

    Absolutely no chance. For years they had undeniable proofs of Indian and American's involvement in training and financing of the TTP and BLF, but they never make it public or protest in the world forums.

    Their cowardice has brought Pakistan and its supporters to this point, that we are constantly been pressured and derided in the International Media. And the Indians try to level false accusations on Pakistani when as a matter of fact it is all their's and Americans plans at work. We can not expect people like Malik or Zardari to be honest and patriotic. These thieves are in for their own business, when hard times come, they will pack their bags and leave.
     
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  5. sparklingway

    sparklingway SENIOR MEMBER

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    Journalist Saleem Shahzad goes missing
    DAWN.COM
    Yesterday

    ISLAMABAD: Syed Saleem Shahzad, the Pakistan bureau chief of Asia Times Online, went missing Sunday evening, DawnNews reported.

    Days before his disappearance, Shahzad had authored an article that alleged links between navy officials and al Qaeda.

    Ali Imran, a Coordinator at the South Asia Free Media Association (Safma) in an email stated that Mr Shahbaz had left his house in Islamabad to participate in a television program but that he did not reach the TV station.

    He did not contact his family and friends either, Mr Imran said, adding that Mr Shahzad’s mobile phone and car had not been traced yet.

    Bolta Pakistan - Relevant portion start at 7:15





    Message from Ali Dayan Hasanm, Pakistan Representative of Human Rights Watch

    HRW has "credible information" that suggests Saleem Shahzad is in ISI custody. Not my personal opinion. Journalist Saleem Shahzad feared abduction by ISI. and left statement with HRW in case of abduction. HRW can confirm that on October 17, 2010 DG Media Wing ISI, Rear Admiral Adnan Nazir summoned journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad.

    DG Media Wing ISI, Rear Admiral Adnan Nazir to journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad “I must give you a favor. We have recently arrested a terrorist and have recovered a lot of data, dairies and other material during the interrogation. The terrorist had a hit list with him. If I find your name in the list, I will certainly let you know." Oct 17, 2010.

    He had a couple of weeks ago filed an interview with Mullah Nazir, where the "good Taliban" commander accepted alignment with Al-Qaeda.

    Asia Times Online :: South Asia news, business and economy from India and Pakistan
    Asia Times Online :: South Asia news, business and economy from India and Pakistan
     
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  6. Bail_Gadi_Driver

    Bail_Gadi_Driver BANNED

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    what the ........ is going on ???????:help:
     
  7. Muhammad-Bin-Qasim

    Muhammad-Bin-Qasim SENIOR MEMBER

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    I have been getting messages all day about Saleem's disappearance...
     
  8. AgNoStiC MuSliM

    AgNoStiC MuSliM PDF Veteran

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    Could have been abducted by the TTP, keeping in mind the Khwaja Khalid and Col Imam abductions and killings. He did after all meet with a lot of AQ and Taliban figures.

    One should hope that it is the ISI that picked him up, since he stands a better chance to come out alive in that case. The only motives for the ISI to pick him up would be to try and get him to divulge his contacts/information on the 'inside job' story in order to track down terrorists and terrorist sympathizers within the Navy.
     
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  9. Evil Flare

    Evil Flare SENIOR MEMBER

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    Lawlessness .. we are living in a Jungle with no RULE OF LAW .
     
  10. Abu Zolfiqar

    Abu Zolfiqar Rest in Peace

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    yes kidnapping is a problem in parts of the country, but there are some rascal trouble-maker journalists who as usual are resorting to sensationalism and propaganda when dealing with this kidnap and the reporting around it
     
  11. Dance

    Dance SENIOR MEMBER

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    I hope they find him safe and sound. But I'm not expecting anything from the government, after all when they don't care about the numerous missing persons in Balochistan they aren't going to do much about this.
     
  12. sparklingway

    sparklingway SENIOR MEMBER

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    The blocked number, untracable call has already been made to family and a journalist union's rep. When they do it, everyone knows.

    This is a Military state.
     
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  13. DESERT FIGHTER

    DESERT FIGHTER ELITE MEMBER

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    Lol i thought it was a police state...........Anyways......kissan bhai agnostic is right..........If ISI took him they would probably let him go after they get his sources...... To root out the problem............ Hence dont worry........Order a pizza and a diet coke......... switch on ur plasma tv and chillax in ur comfy home in "amreeka".
     
  14. sparklingway

    sparklingway SENIOR MEMBER

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    A Pakistani Journalist Vanishes: Is the I.S.I. Involved?
    By Omar Waraich / Islamabad Tuesday, May 31, 2011

    Fears are growing for the safety of a well-known Pakistani journalist who has been missing for 39 hours now and, according to an international advocacy group, is believed to be in the custody of the Pakistan's controversial Directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). Human Rights Watch declared that Saleem Shahzad, a reporter working for the Hong Kong-based Asia Times Online and Kronos International, the Italian news agency, could be subject to mistreatment and even torture while in custody.

    While the ISI was said to have bristled at previous reports by Shahzad, his disappearance happened two days after he wrote a story for Asia Times Online that said that al-Qaeda had attacked a naval base in the port city of Karachi on May 22 after talks had broken down between the Pakistan navy and the global terror organization. In his report, Shahzad claimed that al-Qaeda had carried out the attack in retaliation for the arrest of naval officials suspected of links with the terror group.

    The 17-hour attack on the Karachi naval base by at least four attackers led to the destruction of two Lockheed Martin P-3C Orion aircraft that had been enhanced with counterterrorism capabilities. An investigation is currently underway. At the time of the attack, former military officers and analysts speculated that it could not have been mounted without some help from the inside.

    On Monday, Pakistani intelligence officials told journalists that they had picked up Kamran Ahmed Malik, a former navy commando, in Lahore on Friday. Malik was detained in connection with the investigation, in addition to a third man from the central Punjabi city of Faisalabad. While Malik has not been formally charged, it is widely reported that he is being held for questioning about his links to both the terrorists and former colleagues inside the Navy.

    Shahzad, the missing journalist, is believed to have been abducted by intelligence agents from the well-heeled F-6/2 area of Islamabad at around 5:45 p.m. At the time, he was on his way to the studios of Pakistan's Dunya News channel to discuss the contents of his latest report about the naval base attack. He had driven there from his house in central Islamabad's leafy F-8/4 neighborhood, some four kilometers away. At quarter to six, Shahzad had responded to a call from a producer at Dunya News and said that he was on his way, says Nasim Zehra, director of current affairs at the channel. No one has heard from him since.

    The following morning, Ali Dayan Hasan, a senior researcher at Human Rights Watch, received a call from Shahzad's wife. "He had told her that I was one of the people that should be called in case anything happens to him," says Hasan. "He had feared for sometime that something like this would happen to him." Later, Human Rights Watch was able to establish that Shahzad was being held by the ISI. "We were informed through reliable interlocutors that he was detained by the ISI," says Hasan. Those interlocutors, he adds, had received direct confirmation from the agency that it was detaining Shahzad. In any case, Hasan says, "in a high security zone like Islamabad, it is only the ISI that can effect the disappearance of man and his car without a trace."

    Human Rights Watch was also told that Shahzad was supposed to return home on Monday night. "The relevant people were informed that his telephone would be switched on first, enabling him to communicate with his family," says Hasan. "They were told that he would return home soon after." But by 1 a.m. on Tuesday morning, Shahzad had still not been heard from. At that point, Hasan recalled that Shahzad had sent him an email on Oct. 18, 2010 that was to be released in the event of his disappearance. At the time, says Hasan, he was "fairly sure that sooner or later something was going to happen." Human Rights Watch says that it has made repeated attempts to contact the Pakistan government and establish Shahzad's whereabouts, but has received no response.

    On Oct. 17, Shahzad had been summoned to the ISI's headquarters to discuss the contents of an article published the day before with two officials from the agency's media wing. That report, published in Asia Times Online, alleged that Pakistan had quietly released Afghan Taliban commander Mullah Baradar, Mullah Omar's deputy, to take part in talks through the Pakistan Army. According to the email, labeled "For future reference" and seen by TIME, one of the officials said the following words to Shahzad: "I must give you a favor. We have recently arrested a terrorist and recovered a lot of data, diaries and other material during the interrogation. The terrorist had a list with him. If I find your name in the list, I will certainly let you know." Incidentally, the two ISI officials present at the meeting, Rear Admiral Adnan Nawaz and Commodore Khalid Pervaiz, are both from the Navy. Pervaiz has just been appointed the new commander of the Karachi naval base that was attacked.

    Hasan of Human Rights Watch says that statement can be read as a threat. "The tone and the manner in which it was issued did constitute a threat," he says. "Shahzad described it to me." The rest of the meeting, as Shahzad described it in the email, was held in "an extremely polite and friendly atmosphere," but no words were minced. In the email, the ISI official was said to have asked for the source of his story. Shahzad writes that he would name the source, but said that he had been told the information by an intelligence official and later confirmed the story from "the most credible Taliban source." According to Shahzad's account, he was asked to "write a denial of the story" but "refused to comply with the [ISI] demand."

    Many of Shahzad's media colleagues speculate that the ISI is holding him to extract the identities of his sources. "It is very difficult to say what they want from him," says Hasan. "But when the ISI picks up journalists in this manner, they are often subjected to mistreatment and torture. The longer he stays in their custody, the greater the likelihood is that he will be tortured."

    Last September, Umar Cheema, an investigative reporter for The News, an influential Pakistani daily, was kidnapped, blindfolded, stripped naked, had his head and eyebrows shaved, beaten, filmed in humiliating positions, and dumped on the side of the road six hours later. "If you can't avoid rape," one of his interrogators jeered during the ordeal, "enjoy it." The perpetrators were never found, but when asked about his suspicions, Cheema told the New York Times: "I have suspicions and every journalist has suspicions that all fingers point to the ISI."

    The disappearance of Shahzad is a reminder of the multiple hazards faced by journalists working in Pakistan. In January, Wali Khan Babar, a respected reporter for Geo News, was gunned down in Karachi. Last month, reporter Abdullah Bhittani cheated death after being shot three times in Rawalpindi, while a radio station in the northwest town of Charsadda was bombed. Bhittani has recovered, but with 10 slain journalists last year, the Washington DC-based Newseum called Pakistan "the deadliest country in the world for journalists." Reporters Without Borders ranked it 151st out of 178 countries when it comes to press freedom.

    The principal threats, human rights campaigners say, come from military intelligence agencies and Islamist militants. "As a consequence, it is becoming difficult for journalists to perform their basic professional duties in the context of a war between the Pakistani state and the militants," Hasan says. "Both parties target journalists, arbitrarily and with brutality." Human Rights Watch has called on the Pakistan government to locate Shahzad, return him safely to his home, and hold those who held him "illegally" accountable. "To date, no intelligence personnel have been held accountable for frequently perpetrated abuses against journalists," laments Hasan. "Tolerance for these practices has to end, now."

    A Pakistani Journalist Vanishes: Is the I.S.I. Involved? - TIME
     
  15. pmukherjee

    pmukherjee SENIOR MEMBER

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    Your guys are really incredible, even when things are in such a great mess in your country, you guys still blame others for the rot that has set in inside Pakistan without recognising and accepting the real problem. All these problems are occurring because of the total Islamisation of your armed forces, bureaucracy, judiciary and your national polity. The strongest pillar of Pakistan is its Army and thanks to Zia-ul-Haq, the defence services are very deeply Islamised today. Whether it was the attacks on Musharraf or the GHQ attack or on the para military recruits a couple of weeks ago or the one on PNS Mehran, all were facilitated by radical insiders. Not Indians or Americans or Jews, all Pakistanis who had taken the oath to defend the country. The attacks on the Governor, the minorities minister or Benazir were not carried out by Indians or Americans. Even the educated civil society of Pakistan is highly either highly radicalised of totally cowed down by the radicals. The few isolated voices of reason that one get to hear from Pakistan are immediately drowned out either by being branded Indian agents or are threatened into submission or simply gunned down. Where do you think all this is leading? I think there is still time to rein in these radicals but a very concerted effort has to be made. But first the real problem has to be understood and accepted. Opportunists like ZA Bhutto and Zia are more to blame for Pakistan's troubles than the WOT.

    This is not a troll or an attempt to belittle Pakistan, just my analysis of the situation.
    Regards.
     
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