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Jordan puts Chinese UAVs on sale

cabatli_53

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The countries that is not happy with Chinese drone performances and/or meeting maintenance problems.
  • Jordan
  • Iraq
  • Egypt
  • UAE wasting their chinese drones in Yemen and Libya. According to “Forbes”, Many UAE drones have been lost in conflicts in Yemen. One CH-4B crashed in August 2018. Another one is crashed in Sept18 in Yemen. One UAE drone has been shot down thanks to Turkish laser gun in Libya. Bayraktar TB2 has destroyed unknown number of them with striking the bases they are stationed.
upload_2019-10-2_20-44-44.jpeg
 

Beast

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The countries that is not happy with Chinese drone performances and/or meeting maintenance problems.
  • Jordan
  • Iraq
  • Egypt
  • UAE wasting their chinese drones in Yemen and Libya. According to “Forbes”, Many UAE drones have been lost in conflicts in Yemen. One CH-4B crashed in August 2018. Another one is crashed in Sept18 in Yemen. One UAE drone has been shot down thanks to Turkish laser gun in Libya. Bayraktar TB2 has destroyed unknown number of them with striking the bases they are stationed.
View attachment 582207
Obviously, some know the truth but selective post news to serve some agenda.

https://www.jordantimes.com/news/local/us-endorses-1525-billion-aid-jordan-additional-250m

https://www.thenational.ae/world/us...e-armed-drone-sales-to-uae-and-jordan-1.47368

When somebody gives u billion and then ask u to drop opponent equipment. And ask to buy their instead. It's doesn't need a genius to realise China drone dropped by Jordan got nothing to do with quality problem.
 

Turan09

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Turkey, Losers, poor and stupid country, the world terrorist center, make the skirmish everywhere, cry like a girl and ask the mob ban when others fight back

Your weak ottoman was rig into pieces before, your weak turkey will be rigged off Kurdistan again

Turkey have no technology , however you boast, no country buy your shit drones except turkey itself pay the bills
Butthurt alarm! You have a thin skin really... so sad that You dont have anything to say except this insults... You are humilating yourself and other chin chons... and you know what? Our allies pays 3x money to our tactical UCAVs while your allies trying to get rid of your 3 year old ''male'' Ucavs... now if You want to praise your garbage come with evidence or just shut up. We are not here to listen your ''small size'' obsessions...
 
Last edited:

royalharris

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Losers,
except you pay it by yourself or sell it to the vessel state like qatar, No country will buy Turkish shit only if it is not idiot
 

Turan09

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Losers,
except you pay it by yourself or sell it to the vessel state like qatar, No country will buy Turkish shit only if it is not idiot
Ukraine, Qatar And libya You mean? You can buy 3 chinese ''male'' wing loong 2 with a price of one tactical Bayraktar TB-2... You sold your garbage to arabs that, US-Israel or Turkey wont sell them. Central asians or nigerians doesnt have enough money to pay us. Our product is not cheap anyway. So enjoy your marketshare, We saw who is better, in Libya. Your garbage lost every battle to a tactical UCAV.
Btw, Ukraine wants to buy 13 Akinci, too. They are satisfied with the performance of Bayraktar of course And you? Your one costumer trying to sell her 3 years old drones. Otherone only maintain 1 of it. Sure We can see who is the loser, here.
 

TexasJohn

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Obviously, some know the truth but selective post news to serve some agenda.

https://www.jordantimes.com/news/local/us-endorses-1525-billion-aid-jordan-additional-250m

https://www.thenational.ae/world/us...e-armed-drone-sales-to-uae-and-jordan-1.47368

When somebody gives u billion and then ask u to drop opponent equipment. And ask to buy their instead. It's doesn't need a genius to realise China drone dropped by Jordan got nothing to do with quality problem.
err...no
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/why-no-one-wants-buy-chinas-ch-4-killer-drone-anymore-92546

Why No One Wants to Buy China's CH-4 "Killer" Drone Anymore

What happened?

by David Axe Follow @daxe on TwitterL

Key point: Beijing's CH-4 may be cheaper than American drones, but it isn't as good either.

SPONSORED CONTENT
Recommended by

China’s CH-4 killer drone appears to be falling out of favor with some of its major operators.


The Iraqi air force is down to just one operational CH-4 out of a fleet of around 10, according to an August 2019 report from the U.S. inspector-general.

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve, the U.S.-led operation targeting Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, told the inspector-general that maintenance problems have grounded most of the Iraqi CH-4s.

The CH-4 is roughly similar to the U.S.-made MQ-1 Predator. The Chinese unmanned aerial vehicle, which is remotely-controlled via satellite and can carry a variety of missiles, briefly was popular among Middle East militaries that balked at the cost, politics and paperwork associated with acquiring armed drones from the United States.


10
SECONDS
Do You Know What Happened Today In History?
Nov
2
2016



The Chicago Cubs defeat the Cleveland Indians in the World Series, ending the longest Major League Baseball championship drought of 108 years.


The Levelland UFO Case in Levelland, Texas, generates national publicity.


But the Chinese drones seem to be going out of style. The Jordanian air force in June 2019 put up for sale its own six CH-4s.

It’s unclear why Amman is trying to get rid of its CH-4s just three years after acquiring them. But it’s possible the divestment is related to Jordan’s ongoing efforts to source Predator-style drones from the United States.


Jordan bought the missile-armed CH-4s around 2016 after the administration of U.S. president Barack Obama rejected Amman’s request for MQ-1s.

General Atomics also makes the larger MQ-9 Reaper drone.


The Jordanian air force’s No. 9 Squadron operated the Chinese-made drones. The same unit operates the air force’s other unmanned aerial vehicle, including Schiebel S-100 Camcopters and Leonardo Falcos.

It wasn’t until May 2018 that the Jordanian air force displayed a CH-4 in public.


“Marketed by Aerospace Long-March International Trade, the CH-4B has found a good market here in the Middle East, in part due to the reluctance of U.S. authorities to sell armed UAVs to their allies in the region,” Al-Monitor reported.

“Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Iraq have all acquired the CH-4B armed version, and the type has been employed widely on operations in Yemen and against [ISIS] targets in Iraq.”


But Jordan never gave up trying to get permission to buy American drones, which are widely considered as having better sensors, weapons and communications links than the Chinese drones do.

Amman perhaps believes Pres. Donald Trump is more open to approving drone sales to Middle East customers, not only for the military benefit but also as a way of commercially competing with China.


“The Donald Trump administration is worried that weapons carrying the ’Made in China’ label are becoming ubiquitous on Middle East battlefields,” Al-Monitor explained.

In increasing numbers, traditional U.S. allies are turning to Beijing for technologies that the United States is constrained from exporting as a signatory of international arms control treaties. The Pentagon is increasingly concerned that China’s growing arms sales give the country more clout to secure an economic and military foothold and relationships with U.S. allies in a region where defense officials often control the purse strings.


"It's potentially a tool for them to develop closer defense and military ties, particularly for future access,” Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Affairs Randall Schriver told Al-Monitor at a recent Pentagon briefing. “China is less disciplined, and so there's a proliferation risk as well to regimes that we would regard as not necessarily responsible.”




Of course, it’s also possible that Jordan aims to replace the CH-4s with better Chinese-made drones.

Based on customers’ experience deploying the CH-4, drone-maker China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation developed the larger and more powerful CH-5.


“The CH-5 offers a … 441-pound internal payload for sensors and a … 2,205-pound external payload, permitting it to carry up to 16 precision-guided missiles underwing,” Jane’s reported. “This vehicle is roughly equivalent to the MQ-9 Reaper, although it retains a piston engine instead of the Reaper’s turboprop.”


In Iraq at least, the CH-4 is not unique in suffering maintenance woes.

Alongside the Chinese-made CH-4s, Iraq also acquired 10 smaller ScanEagle drones from U.S. manufacturer Insitu.

But according to inspector-general, the ScanEagles flew just two sorties between March and June 2019 owing to a "combination of Iraqi training in the United States, a lapse in maintenance contracts and problems with signal interference.”
 

Beast

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err...no
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/why-no-one-wants-buy-chinas-ch-4-killer-drone-anymore-92546

Why No One Wants to Buy China's CH-4 "Killer" Drone Anymore

What happened?

by David Axe Follow @daxe on TwitterL

Key point: Beijing's CH-4 may be cheaper than American drones, but it isn't as good either.

SPONSORED CONTENT
Recommended by

China’s CH-4 killer drone appears to be falling out of favor with some of its major operators.


The Iraqi air force is down to just one operational CH-4 out of a fleet of around 10, according to an August 2019 report from the U.S. inspector-general.

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve, the U.S.-led operation targeting Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, told the inspector-general that maintenance problems have grounded most of the Iraqi CH-4s.

The CH-4 is roughly similar to the U.S.-made MQ-1 Predator. The Chinese unmanned aerial vehicle, which is remotely-controlled via satellite and can carry a variety of missiles, briefly was popular among Middle East militaries that balked at the cost, politics and paperwork associated with acquiring armed drones from the United States.


10
SECONDS
Do You Know What Happened Today In History?
Nov
2
2016



The Chicago Cubs defeat the Cleveland Indians in the World Series, ending the longest Major League Baseball championship drought of 108 years.


The Levelland UFO Case in Levelland, Texas, generates national publicity.


But the Chinese drones seem to be going out of style. The Jordanian air force in June 2019 put up for sale its own six CH-4s.

It’s unclear why Amman is trying to get rid of its CH-4s just three years after acquiring them. But it’s possible the divestment is related to Jordan’s ongoing efforts to source Predator-style drones from the United States.


Jordan bought the missile-armed CH-4s around 2016 after the administration of U.S. president Barack Obama rejected Amman’s request for MQ-1s.

General Atomics also makes the larger MQ-9 Reaper drone.


The Jordanian air force’s No. 9 Squadron operated the Chinese-made drones. The same unit operates the air force’s other unmanned aerial vehicle, including Schiebel S-100 Camcopters and Leonardo Falcos.

It wasn’t until May 2018 that the Jordanian air force displayed a CH-4 in public.


“Marketed by Aerospace Long-March International Trade, the CH-4B has found a good market here in the Middle East, in part due to the reluctance of U.S. authorities to sell armed UAVs to their allies in the region,” Al-Monitor reported.

“Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Iraq have all acquired the CH-4B armed version, and the type has been employed widely on operations in Yemen and against [ISIS] targets in Iraq.”


But Jordan never gave up trying to get permission to buy American drones, which are widely considered as having better sensors, weapons and communications links than the Chinese drones do.

Amman perhaps believes Pres. Donald Trump is more open to approving drone sales to Middle East customers, not only for the military benefit but also as a way of commercially competing with China.


“The Donald Trump administration is worried that weapons carrying the ’Made in China’ label are becoming ubiquitous on Middle East battlefields,” Al-Monitor explained.

In increasing numbers, traditional U.S. allies are turning to Beijing for technologies that the United States is constrained from exporting as a signatory of international arms control treaties. The Pentagon is increasingly concerned that China’s growing arms sales give the country more clout to secure an economic and military foothold and relationships with U.S. allies in a region where defense officials often control the purse strings.


"It's potentially a tool for them to develop closer defense and military ties, particularly for future access,” Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Affairs Randall Schriver told Al-Monitor at a recent Pentagon briefing. “China is less disciplined, and so there's a proliferation risk as well to regimes that we would regard as not necessarily responsible.”




Of course, it’s also possible that Jordan aims to replace the CH-4s with better Chinese-made drones.

Based on customers’ experience deploying the CH-4, drone-maker China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation developed the larger and more powerful CH-5.


“The CH-5 offers a … 441-pound internal payload for sensors and a … 2,205-pound external payload, permitting it to carry up to 16 precision-guided missiles underwing,” Jane’s reported. “This vehicle is roughly equivalent to the MQ-9 Reaper, although it retains a piston engine instead of the Reaper’s turboprop.”


In Iraq at least, the CH-4 is not unique in suffering maintenance woes.

Alongside the Chinese-made CH-4s, Iraq also acquired 10 smaller ScanEagle drones from U.S. manufacturer Insitu.

But according to inspector-general, the ScanEagles flew just two sorties between March and June 2019 owing to a "combination of Iraqi training in the United States, a lapse in maintenance contracts and problems with signal interference.”
Lol.. if you can take american words for real. The earth is cube. American are famous for fabricating lies and fakes news. They behaviour like snake. Even Trump himself claim CNN is fake. I am not maglinging american but its fact. :enjoy:

What you expect them to speak good of China?
 

PakFactor

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Alongside the Chinese-made CH-4s, Iraq also acquired 10 smaller ScanEagle drones from U.S. manufacturer Insitu.

But according to inspector-general, the ScanEagles flew just two sorties between March and June 2019 owing to a "combination of Iraqi training in the United States, a lapse in maintenance contracts and problems with signal interference.”
It's not Chinese equipment it's just Arabs can't maintain their own equipment after purchasing, and they suck at fighting. If they had have ScanEagles (U.S.) product and can't keep it flying is that American fault to?
 

mike2000 is back

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err...no
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/why-no-one-wants-buy-chinas-ch-4-killer-drone-anymore-92546

Why No One Wants to Buy China's CH-4 "Killer" Drone Anymore

What happened?

by David Axe Follow @daxe on TwitterL

Key point: Beijing's CH-4 may be cheaper than American drones, but it isn't as good either.

SPONSORED CONTENT
Recommended by

China’s CH-4 killer drone appears to be falling out of favor with some of its major operators.


The Iraqi air force is down to just one operational CH-4 out of a fleet of around 10, according to an August 2019 report from the U.S. inspector-general.

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve, the U.S.-led operation targeting Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, told the inspector-general that maintenance problems have grounded most of the Iraqi CH-4s.

The CH-4 is roughly similar to the U.S.-made MQ-1 Predator. The Chinese unmanned aerial vehicle, which is remotely-controlled via satellite and can carry a variety of missiles, briefly was popular among Middle East militaries that balked at the cost, politics and paperwork associated with acquiring armed drones from the United States.


10
SECONDS
Do You Know What Happened Today In History?
Nov
2
2016



The Chicago Cubs defeat the Cleveland Indians in the World Series, ending the longest Major League Baseball championship drought of 108 years.


The Levelland UFO Case in Levelland, Texas, generates national publicity.


But the Chinese drones seem to be going out of style. The Jordanian air force in June 2019 put up for sale its own six CH-4s.

It’s unclear why Amman is trying to get rid of its CH-4s just three years after acquiring them. But it’s possible the divestment is related to Jordan’s ongoing efforts to source Predator-style drones from the United States.


Jordan bought the missile-armed CH-4s around 2016 after the administration of U.S. president Barack Obama rejected Amman’s request for MQ-1s.

General Atomics also makes the larger MQ-9 Reaper drone.


The Jordanian air force’s No. 9 Squadron operated the Chinese-made drones. The same unit operates the air force’s other unmanned aerial vehicle, including Schiebel S-100 Camcopters and Leonardo Falcos.

It wasn’t until May 2018 that the Jordanian air force displayed a CH-4 in public.


“Marketed by Aerospace Long-March International Trade, the CH-4B has found a good market here in the Middle East, in part due to the reluctance of U.S. authorities to sell armed UAVs to their allies in the region,” Al-Monitor reported.

“Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Iraq have all acquired the CH-4B armed version, and the type has been employed widely on operations in Yemen and against [ISIS] targets in Iraq.”


But Jordan never gave up trying to get permission to buy American drones, which are widely considered as having better sensors, weapons and communications links than the Chinese drones do.

Amman perhaps believes Pres. Donald Trump is more open to approving drone sales to Middle East customers, not only for the military benefit but also as a way of commercially competing with China.


“The Donald Trump administration is worried that weapons carrying the ’Made in China’ label are becoming ubiquitous on Middle East battlefields,” Al-Monitor explained.

In increasing numbers, traditional U.S. allies are turning to Beijing for technologies that the United States is constrained from exporting as a signatory of international arms control treaties. The Pentagon is increasingly concerned that China’s growing arms sales give the country more clout to secure an economic and military foothold and relationships with U.S. allies in a region where defense officials often control the purse strings.


"It's potentially a tool for them to develop closer defense and military ties, particularly for future access,” Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Affairs Randall Schriver told Al-Monitor at a recent Pentagon briefing. “China is less disciplined, and so there's a proliferation risk as well to regimes that we would regard as not necessarily responsible.”




Of course, it’s also possible that Jordan aims to replace the CH-4s with better Chinese-made drones.

Based on customers’ experience deploying the CH-4, drone-maker China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation developed the larger and more powerful CH-5.


“The CH-5 offers a … 441-pound internal payload for sensors and a … 2,205-pound external payload, permitting it to carry up to 16 precision-guided missiles underwing,” Jane’s reported. “This vehicle is roughly equivalent to the MQ-9 Reaper, although it retains a piston engine instead of the Reaper’s turboprop.”


In Iraq at least, the CH-4 is not unique in suffering maintenance woes.

Alongside the Chinese-made CH-4s, Iraq also acquired 10 smaller ScanEagle drones from U.S. manufacturer Insitu.

But according to inspector-general, the ScanEagles flew just two sorties between March and June 2019 owing to a "combination of Iraqi training in the United States, a lapse in maintenance contracts and problems with signal interference.”
But according to the second part of this article itself, it says that Jordan put the drones for sale due to Jordan expecting to receive new reaper drones from the US, something Jordanian authorities have been lobbying to get for a long time now(they couldn't under Obama but Trump has removed the ban/restriction Obama imposed) or maybe Jordan is expecting to buy Chinese drones (CH5/Winglong 2) .This are the 2 options the article talks about which I think is more credible . As for Iraq, just like the article pointed out, it is more due to incompetency and lack of maintenance, so reason even Iraq's US made UAV systems are also out of service. So it's not really a case of Chinese UCAV being bad. If that was the case many other countries won't be buying them as of recent.
 

Patriot786b2

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In War Cost is sacrificed to buy equipment.
If the customer( arab ) cannot use his equipment to best of his skills to fight enemy?
Than it is a customer (in this case Arab ) problem.
If a customer cannot buy premium product than it is customer (Arab) problem.
You cannot buy a product & later wine or complain about its use.
Whether it is Chinese, Turkish or American at the end of the day in cost effective budgets
you get quantity what you pay for? If a third world country like Pakistan affords to buy bulk South American products for larger quantities numbers than they are confident in using those product to defend the nation against a bigger enemy with larger numbers. There is no time to complain after purchasing in war situation simply.
Note : PAF pilot is Yum Kippur War defeated Isreali superior fighters of American latest technology by Russian aircraft. So it all depends on the skill set of using to advantage at the moment.
 

PakFactor

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In War Cost is sacrificed to buy equipment.
If the customer( arab ) cannot use his equipment to best of his skills to fight enemy?
Than it is a customer (in this case Arab ) problem.
If a customer cannot buy premium product than it is customer (Arab) problem.
You cannot buy a product & later wine or complain about its use.
Whether it is Chinese, Turkish or American at the end of the day in cost effective budgets
you get quantity what you pay for? If a third world country like Pakistan affords to buy bulk South American products for larger quantities numbers than they are confident in using those product to defend the nation against a bigger enemy with larger numbers. There is no time to complain after purchasing in war situation simply.
Note : PAF pilot is Yum Kippur War defeated Isreali superior fighters of American latest technology by Russian aircraft. So it all depends on the skill set of using to advantage at the moment.
Completely forgot about the Yum Kippur War and that to weren't the best Syrians had but we made due.
God I love being a Pakistani.
 

LKJ86

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Libya’s GNA says Jordan sold UAVs to its enemy
Jeremy Binnie, London - Jane's Defence Weekly
06 April 2020
Source:https://www.janes.com/article/95347/libya-s-gna-says-jordan-sold-uavs-to-its-enemy

Libya's Government of National Accord (GNA) has said that Jordan has sold Chinese-made unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to the Libyan National Army: a powerful faction led by former general Khalifa Haftar.

In a letter to the UN Security Council that was made public on 4 April, GNA Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohamed Siala complained that several foreign states are supplying "all types of weapons" to the LNA in contravention of the arms embargo imposed by the UN Security Council.

"One of the aircraft being used in the war against Tripoli and the cities of western Libya is the Chinese Wing Loong drone, which Haftar recently brought in from Jordan," he wrote. "According to available information, the drones were sold to Jordan for the purpose of protecting that country's frontier. However, having been delivered to Haftar's forces, they are now being used outside its borders in a clear violation of Security Council resolutions."

He added that Jordanian UAVs had been delivered to Baninah (Benina) Airport in Benghazi aboard an Il-76TD cargo aircraft that arrived from Amman at 17:10 h on 28 March.

Flight tracking data shows an Il-76TD operated by Kazakhstan's Jenis Air was flying from Amman towards Benghazi when its transponder stopped transmitting after 15:00 h GMT (17:00 h Libyan time). The aircraft, UP-17652, has been flying from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Jordan to Libya in recent weeks.

Jordan is not known to have Wing Loong UAVs. However, the Royal Jordanian Air Force (RJAF) acquired CH-4B UAVs in 2016 along with AR-1 laser-guided missiles and FT-9 guided bombs. These are capable of operating beyond line-of-sight as they are fitted with satellite communications equipment.

The RJAF put a statement on its website in June 2019 saying it was looking to sell six CH-4B UAVs.
 

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