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Israel-Palestinian Conflict Resurgence 2021: Al-Aqsa attacks, riots, rockets, military clashes and Jerusalem conflict 2v

khansaheeb

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Hamas can't overrun them militarily that is absolutely fact no none-state actors can but they can do huge damage to them such as Hamas or Hezbollah etc etc or tactically defeat them but not completely defeat overrun them. But the state actors in the region could overrun them quite comfortably except Lebanon
Never say never in this world, history has showed the most brutal tyrants brought down by the sword.
 

khansaheeb

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Palestinians urge intl. probe into Israel’s killing of Palestinian youth in West Bank
Sunday, 04 July 2021 4:11 PM [ Last Update: Sunday, 04 July 2021 6:18 PM ]


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Israeli forces deploy amid clashes with Palestinians in the neighborhood of Silwan in East Jerusalem al-Quds, on June 29, 2021. (Photo by AFP)
The Palestinian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Expatriates has called for an international probe into the recent killing of a Palestinian youth by Israeli forces and settlers in the village of Qusra, south of Nablus in the occupied West Bank.
The ministry made the appeal in a statement on Sunday, a day after the 21-year-old victim—identified as Mohammad Fareed Hasan-- was reportedly shot with a live bullet in his chest and succumbed to his injuries a few minutes later, Palestine’s official Wafa news agency reported.
Two other Palestinians were also shot and injured in the foot while fending off an attack by hardcore Israeli settlers on the village, the agency added.
"These attacks and crimes reflect a blatant and clear sharing of roles between the Israeli occupation army and settler militias, their terrorist organizations and associations," the ministry said.
"The international community, the United Nations and the UN Security Council, are required to break this impotent mechanism in dealing with the Israeli occupation’s violations against the Palestinian people, by translating international demands, appeals and condemnations into practical deterrent steps."
Israel attacks Gaza again, kills youth in West Bank in fresh aggression
Israel attacks Gaza again, kills youth in West Bank in fresh aggression
The Israeli regime renews its aerial attacks against the Gaza Strip, while Israeli forces fatally shoot a Palestinian youth in nearby West Bank.

The ministry further held the Tel Aviv regime fully responsible for the latest crime as well as the ongoing violations against Palestinians and their properties.
According to local sources, Hasan was shot dead by the Israeli forces and settlers while he was at his brother's house in Qusra on Saturday, the Palestinian Information Center reported.
The sources said the Israeli troops stormed the house of the victim’s brother after he was wounded and beat him while he was bleeding.
Israeli forces regularly storm Palestinian towns in the West Bank to make arrests, prompting clashes with locals.
The Tel Aviv regime has been heavily criticized for its extensive use of lethal force against Palestinians who do not pose an immediate threat to the occupation forces or to the settlers.
Press TV’s website can also be accessed at the following alternate addresses:
 

SalarHaqq

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Recent piece about Islamic Iran's drone technology transfers to the Palestinian Resistance. These Iranian-designed UAV's were witnessed in action during this year's Gaza conflict.

Deliberately removed some parts dealing with Iran's allies in Lebanon, Iraq and Yemen, but if you're interested in the topic, follow the link below to access the full article. It's worth a read, specially in relation to Hezbollah's drone missions over Occupied Palestine.

__________

Iran’s Drone Transfers to Proxies

By Andrew Hanna

June 30, 2021

Since 2004, Iran has provided drones, components or designs to proxies in at least four locations: Lebanon, Iraq, Yemen, and Gaza. Tehran’s drone exports vary in mission, range, and capabilities. The shortest range can fly only 15 km, or nine miles, while the longest can fly 1,700 km, or 1,000 miles. Some drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), allow Iran’s allies to spy on enemies, while others are used to conduct low-cost kamikaze attacks from a distance. The drones have also allowed Iran to deter attacks beyond its borders by threatening attacks against enemies via proxies. As of mid-2021, Iranian proxies had conducted drone attacks against U.S., Israeli and Saudi forces as well as against jihadi extremists in Syria and Iraq.

In April 2021, Gen. Kenneth McKenzie Jr. warned that the Middle East was becoming a “proving ground for the proliferation and employment of unmanned weaponized systems, many emanating from Iran.” The drone transfers were part of Iran’s asymmetric strategy to compensate for its military weakness. Exporting drones provided Iran with “valuable experience in developing its own systems and in refining tactics, techniques and procedures,” the International Institute for Strategic Studies reported in April 2021. Tehran’s drone transfers have varied in quantity and quality.
  • Lebanon: Since 2004, Iran has transferred drones and provided training on flying drones to Hezbollah, the largest militia and a political powerbroker in Lebanon. Hezbollah has used its drones to spy on an Israeli nuclear reactor, ram into an Israeli warship and kill Syrian jihadi fighters. Hezbollah’s drones have ranges of 150 km to 1,700 km, or 93 miles to 1,056 miles, and can carry payloads weighing up to 150 kg (330 pounds).
  • Gaza: Since 2012, Iran appears to have provided drone designs to Hamas, a Palestinian militant group based in Gaza that opposes Israel. Hamas drones were based off Iranian designs but built using local materials and expertise. During the 11-day conflict with Israel in May 2021, Hamas deployed a new suicide drone that was similar to an Iranian Ababil-T. Hamas drones have ranges of 150 km to 200 km, or 93 miles to 124 miles, and can carry payloads weighing up to 30 kg (66 pounds).
  • Yemen: Since 2016, Iran has transferred drone components and provided training on drones to Houthi rebels who are fighting a civil war and a military campaign led by Saudi Arabia. The Yemeni rebels possess the most advanced and diverse drone arsenal of Iran’s proxies. The Houthis built their drones using a mix of local materials and high-end components reportedly smuggled into Yemen from Iran. The Houthi drones have ranges of 15 km to 1,700 km, or nine miles to 1,056 miles. They can carry payloads of up to 30 kg (66 pounds).
  • Iraq: Since 2015, Iran has transferred drones and provided training to at least four Shiite militias in Iraq. Iraqi militias first used drones to spy on the Islamic State in 2015. Since April 2021, Shiite militias have conducted at least six attacks on U.S. and coalition forces using suicide drones. The militias’ drones have ranges of 25 km to 150 km, or 15 miles to 93 miles.
The Revolutionary Guards have also exported drones to Iran’s allies outside of the region, such as Venezuela. The following is a detailed rundown of drone capabilities acquired by Iranian proxies.

...

Hamas (Gaza)
Hamas’s drone program has existed since 2012, but the Gaza-based militants have one of the smaller and less advanced arsenals compared with Iran’s other proxies. Its drones bear a close resemblance to Iranian counterparts but may have been constructed using local materials. Hamas has used its drones to surveil Israeli sites; it launched kamikaze-style drone attacks on Israel in 2014, 2018, 2019 and 2021. As of mid-2021, Hamas’s inventory included:
  • The Ababil-1 is a light-weight drone used for combat and reconnaissance. It is similar to the Iranian Sarir H-110, which has a range of 200 km (124 miles) and can fly five hours. Its flight ceiling is 5,000 meters (3 miles).
  • The Shehab is a light-weight drone used for combat and reconnaissance. It is similar to the Ababil-T, which has a range of 150 km to 200 km (93 miles to 124 miles) and can fly for two hours. Its flight ceiling is 3,000 meters (9,800 feet). It can carry a 30 kg (66 pounds) payload.

History
In November 2012, the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) released a video allegedly showing Hamas conducting drone flight tests; it was the first indication that the Gaza militants had a nascent drone program. In July 2014, Hamas unveiled three homemade drones: the Ababil-1A for reconnaissance, the Ababil-1B for bombing missions, and the Ababil-1C for kamikaze-style attacks. Analysts said that the drones resembled the Iranian Sarir H-110, which had been displayed in Tehran the previous year. A propaganda video released by Hamas depicted the Ababil-1B carrying four missiles under its wing. The missiles were likely fake, The Aviationist reported.

Hamas testing a UAV

The Hamas drone program faced two major setbacks. The first setback was an Israeli airstrike that hit eight Hamas drone storage facilities. The second setback was the assassination of Mohammed Zawahri, a leading Hamas drone engineer, in December 2016. Zawahri was shot six times at close range by assailants while sitting in his car in Tunisia. The militant Palestinian group blamed Israel for the attack and acknowledged that Zawahri had designed drones for its military wing, the Al Qassam Brigades.
Hamas first employed drones in combat during the 2014 Gaza War. The Sunni militant group said that it flew three drone missions into Israeli airspace, including one mission over Tel Aviv. Israel shot down a drone over Ashdod and another over Ashkelon. Hamas claimed responsibility for the downed drones and said that they had been carrying out “special missions” inside Israel.

The Shehab suicide drone unveiled by Hamas in May 2021

A Shehab suicide drone unveiled by Hamas in May 2021

Hamas redoubled its efforts to expand its drone program after the 2014 Gaza War. It established an air unit sometime between 2017 and 2018 to operate spy drones, Haaretz reported. In May 2018, it launched at least three drones carrying explosives toward Israel: one landed in the Negev and two landed in the front lawn of a house near the Gaza border. in 2019, Hamas launched at least four separate drone attacks against Israel.

In May 2021, Hamas unveiled a new suicide drone, the Shehab, during a 11-day conflict with Israel. The Shehab was a loitering munition; it could hover near its target and explode near it or on impact. It was the “first instance of a precision-guided munition in Gaza,” said Fabian Hinz, an arms expert. In a propaganda video, Hamas displayed at least four Shehab drones. Analysts said that the Shehab was similar to the Iranian Ababil-T drone or the Houthis’ Qasef-1 drone, although it was smaller in wingspan.

...

 

Titanium100

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Recent piece about Islamic Iran's drone technology transfers to the Palestinian Resistance. These Iranian-designed UAV's were witnessed in action during this year's Gaza conflict.

Deliberately removed some parts dealing with Iran's allies in Lebanon, Iraq and Yemen, but if you're interested in the topic, follow the link below to access the full article. It's worth a read, specially in relation to Hezbollah's drone missions over Occupied Palestine.

__________

Iran’s Drone Transfers to Proxies

By Andrew Hanna

June 30, 2021

Since 2004, Iran has provided drones, components or designs to proxies in at least four locations: Lebanon, Iraq, Yemen, and Gaza. Tehran’s drone exports vary in mission, range, and capabilities. The shortest range can fly only 15 km, or nine miles, while the longest can fly 1,700 km, or 1,000 miles. Some drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), allow Iran’s allies to spy on enemies, while others are used to conduct low-cost kamikaze attacks from a distance. The drones have also allowed Iran to deter attacks beyond its borders by threatening attacks against enemies via proxies. As of mid-2021, Iranian proxies had conducted drone attacks against U.S., Israeli and Saudi forces as well as against jihadi extremists in Syria and Iraq.

In April 2021, Gen. Kenneth McKenzie Jr. warned that the Middle East was becoming a “proving ground for the proliferation and employment of unmanned weaponized systems, many emanating from Iran.” The drone transfers were part of Iran’s asymmetric strategy to compensate for its military weakness. Exporting drones provided Iran with “valuable experience in developing its own systems and in refining tactics, techniques and procedures,” the International Institute for Strategic Studies reported in April 2021. Tehran’s drone transfers have varied in quantity and quality.
  • Lebanon: Since 2004, Iran has transferred drones and provided training on flying drones to Hezbollah, the largest militia and a political powerbroker in Lebanon. Hezbollah has used its drones to spy on an Israeli nuclear reactor, ram into an Israeli warship and kill Syrian jihadi fighters. Hezbollah’s drones have ranges of 150 km to 1,700 km, or 93 miles to 1,056 miles, and can carry payloads weighing up to 150 kg (330 pounds).
  • Gaza: Since 2012, Iran appears to have provided drone designs to Hamas, a Palestinian militant group based in Gaza that opposes Israel. Hamas drones were based off Iranian designs but built using local materials and expertise. During the 11-day conflict with Israel in May 2021, Hamas deployed a new suicide drone that was similar to an Iranian Ababil-T. Hamas drones have ranges of 150 km to 200 km, or 93 miles to 124 miles, and can carry payloads weighing up to 30 kg (66 pounds).
  • Yemen: Since 2016, Iran has transferred drone components and provided training on drones to Houthi rebels who are fighting a civil war and a military campaign led by Saudi Arabia. The Yemeni rebels possess the most advanced and diverse drone arsenal of Iran’s proxies. The Houthis built their drones using a mix of local materials and high-end components reportedly smuggled into Yemen from Iran. The Houthi drones have ranges of 15 km to 1,700 km, or nine miles to 1,056 miles. They can carry payloads of up to 30 kg (66 pounds).
  • Iraq: Since 2015, Iran has transferred drones and provided training to at least four Shiite militias in Iraq. Iraqi militias first used drones to spy on the Islamic State in 2015. Since April 2021, Shiite militias have conducted at least six attacks on U.S. and coalition forces using suicide drones. The militias’ drones have ranges of 25 km to 150 km, or 15 miles to 93 miles.
The Revolutionary Guards have also exported drones to Iran’s allies outside of the region, such as Venezuela. The following is a detailed rundown of drone capabilities acquired by Iranian proxies.

...

Hamas (Gaza)
Hamas’s drone program has existed since 2012, but the Gaza-based militants have one of the smaller and less advanced arsenals compared with Iran’s other proxies. Its drones bear a close resemblance to Iranian counterparts but may have been constructed using local materials. Hamas has used its drones to surveil Israeli sites; it launched kamikaze-style drone attacks on Israel in 2014, 2018, 2019 and 2021. As of mid-2021, Hamas’s inventory included:
  • The Ababil-1 is a light-weight drone used for combat and reconnaissance. It is similar to the Iranian Sarir H-110, which has a range of 200 km (124 miles) and can fly five hours. Its flight ceiling is 5,000 meters (3 miles).
  • The Shehab is a light-weight drone used for combat and reconnaissance. It is similar to the Ababil-T, which has a range of 150 km to 200 km (93 miles to 124 miles) and can fly for two hours. Its flight ceiling is 3,000 meters (9,800 feet). It can carry a 30 kg (66 pounds) payload.

History
In November 2012, the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) released a video allegedly showing Hamas conducting drone flight tests; it was the first indication that the Gaza militants had a nascent drone program. In July 2014, Hamas unveiled three homemade drones: the Ababil-1A for reconnaissance, the Ababil-1B for bombing missions, and the Ababil-1C for kamikaze-style attacks. Analysts said that the drones resembled the Iranian Sarir H-110, which had been displayed in Tehran the previous year. A propaganda video released by Hamas depicted the Ababil-1B carrying four missiles under its wing. The missiles were likely fake, The Aviationist reported.

Hamas testing a UAV

The Hamas drone program faced two major setbacks. The first setback was an Israeli airstrike that hit eight Hamas drone storage facilities. The second setback was the assassination of Mohammed Zawahri, a leading Hamas drone engineer, in December 2016. Zawahri was shot six times at close range by assailants while sitting in his car in Tunisia. The militant Palestinian group blamed Israel for the attack and acknowledged that Zawahri had designed drones for its military wing, the Al Qassam Brigades.
Hamas first employed drones in combat during the 2014 Gaza War. The Sunni militant group said that it flew three drone missions into Israeli airspace, including one mission over Tel Aviv. Israel shot down a drone over Ashdod and another over Ashkelon. Hamas claimed responsibility for the downed drones and said that they had been carrying out “special missions” inside Israel.

The Shehab suicide drone unveiled by Hamas in May 2021

A Shehab suicide drone unveiled by Hamas in May 2021

Hamas redoubled its efforts to expand its drone program after the 2014 Gaza War. It established an air unit sometime between 2017 and 2018 to operate spy drones, Haaretz reported. In May 2018, it launched at least three drones carrying explosives toward Israel: one landed in the Negev and two landed in the front lawn of a house near the Gaza border. in 2019, Hamas launched at least four separate drone attacks against Israel.

In May 2021, Hamas unveiled a new suicide drone, the Shehab, during a 11-day conflict with Israel. The Shehab was a loitering munition; it could hover near its target and explode near it or on impact. It was the “first instance of a precision-guided munition in Gaza,” said Fabian Hinz, an arms expert. In a propaganda video, Hamas displayed at least four Shehab drones. Analysts said that the Shehab was similar to the Iranian Ababil-T drone or the Houthis’ Qasef-1 drone, although it was smaller in wingspan.

...

My mann never misses the chance to showchase Iran....

Hamas strikes on Israel



I subtly did this to inflat your ego further:partay:
 
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Falcon29

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I subtly did this to inflat your ego further:partay:
They do not play a big role in Hamas military wing anymore. Or a big part of Hamas's military budget(no more than 25%). They want to ride the wave, due to how popular Jerusalem uprising was in Arab and Muslim world. Nothing more.
 

khansaheeb

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Israeli forces injure over 400 Palestinians in Nablus
Friday, 09 July 2021 6:16 PM [ Last Update: Friday, 09 July 2021 6:16 PM ]

US Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) (L) talks with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) during a rally with fellow Democrats before voting on H.R. 1, or the People Act, on the East Steps of the US Capitol on March 08, 2019 in Washington, DC. (AFP photo)

Palestinian Red Crescent medics evacuate an injured Palestinian protester during clashes with Israeli forces in the town of Beita, near the occupied West Bank city of Nablus on July 9, 2021. (Photo by AFP)
Israeli forces have injured 411 Palestinians during clashes with anti-settlement protesters in the town of Beita and the nearby village of Qusra in the occupied West Bank province of Nablus.
According to the Palestine Red Crescent Society, 23 Palestinians were shot with live ammunition fired by Israeli forces during clashes on Sobeih Mountain in the town of Beita, and Qusra, south of Nablus, on Friday.
The injured also included 70 Palestinians who were hit by rubber bullets and 260 others who suffered breathing difficulties due to inhaling tear gas fired by the Israeli troops during the clashes.
Over the past two months, Beita has seen intensified clashes between Israeli forces and Palestinians protesting against a settlement outpost that has been recently established on the mountain by settlers under the protection of Israeli forces.
To the east of Nablus, Israeli forces attacked a weekly anti-settlement protest in the village of Beit Dajan on Friday, using live ammunition and sound bombs against the demonstrators.
Meanwhile, dozens of Palestinians, including children, suffered breathing difficulties due to inhaling tear gas fired by Israeli troops at a weekly anti-settlement rally that was held in the West Bank village of Kafr Qaddum.
Over 600 world academics, intellectuals call for end to ‘Israel's apartheid regime’
Over 600 world academics, intellectuals call for end to ‘Israel's apartheid regime’
More than 600 world academics, artists and intellectuals have called for an end to "Israel

Also on Friday, Israeli forces attacked a protest condemning Israel’s settlement expansion policy and Israeli settlers' repeated attacks on the Palestinians and their properties in Masafer Yatta, south of the West Bank city of al-Khalil (Hebron).
The protesters urged the international community and human rights organizations to shoulder their responsibility and protect the Palestinians from the persistent Israeli attacks.
Israeli forces also attacked Palestinians who gathered in al-Ras area, west of the West Bank city of Salfit, to perform Friday prayers.
Al-Ras area is threatened with seizure by Israel for the construction of a settlement outpost.
More than 600,000 Israelis live in over 230 settlements built since the 1967 Israeli occupation of the West Bank and East Jerusalem al-Quds.
All Israeli settlements are illegal under international law as they are built on occupied land. The United Nations Security Council has condemned Israel’s settlement activities in the occupied territories in several resolutions.
 

khansaheeb

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Turkey's Erdoğan, Abbas discuss ties, Palestinian reconciliation
BY ANADOLU AGENCY
ISTANBUL DIPLOMACY
JUL 10, 2021 6:11 PM GMT+3
A handout picture taken and released by the Turkish Presidential press office on July 10, 2021 shows Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan (R) meeting with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas (L) in Istanbul. (Turkish Presidency via AFP)
A handout picture taken and released by the Turkish Presidential press office on July 10, 2021 shows Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan (R) meeting with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas (L) in Istanbul. (Turkish Presidency via AFP)



President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan welcomed his Palestinian counterpart Mahmoud Abbas for a bilateral meeting in Istanbul on Saturday, Turkey's Communications Directorate said.
The closed-door meeting, which lasted about one hour and 15 minutes, was held at the Vahdettin Pavilion in the Çengelköy quarter of the Asian district of Üsküdar.
Following the presidents' meeting, delegations from both countries met for talks also attended by Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu, Communications Director Fahrettin Altun, Presidential Spokesperson İbrahim Kalın and National Intelligence Organization (MIT) chief Hakan Fidan.

Turkish delegation led by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan (3rd R) and the Palestinian delegation headed by President Mahmoud Abbas (4th L) meet for talks in Istanbul, July 10, 2021. (Turkish Presidency via AA)Turkish delegation led by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan (3rd R) and the Palestinian delegation headed by President Mahmoud Abbas (4th L) meet for talks in Istanbul, July 10, 2021. (Turkish Presidency via AA)

Abbas is on a three-day visit to Turkey at Erdoğan’s invitation.

All aspects of relations between Turkey and Palestine will be discussed during his trip, Turkey’s Communications Directorate said in a previous statement on Friday.
Ways to boost bilateral cooperation, the humanitarian situation in Palestine, and the latest developments in the Israel-Palestine conflict will be discussed, the statement said.
Also expected to be on the agenda are efforts for reconciliation between various Palestinian groups, as well as the highly anticipated elections in Palestine, it added.
 

Bahram Esfandiari

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My mann never misses the chance to showchase Iran....

Hamas strikes on Israel



I subtly did this to inflat your ego further:partay:
It must really hurt your ego knowing that Majoosi Iranians are the only ones actually helping the Palestinian resistance while your Arab brothers are all lined up to take turns to kiss israel's hand!!!
 
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Titanium100

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It must really hurt your ego knowing that Majoosi Iranians are the only ones actually helping the Palestinian resistance while your Arab brothers are all lined up to take turns sucking Israel off huh!
Help yourself first against Israel.. I follow your situation on the ground.. Atleast these arabs fight back if attempted on but not you.. All talk and smoke screen ain't fooling me... Fight back and protect yourself and than come back here... You have betrayed yourself not even others.. Btw that post was only joking nothing serious the one you quoted
 

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