• Thursday, October 17, 2019

Israel, Bangladesh Adopt Legislation to Limit Lead in Paint

Discussion in 'Bangladesh Defence Forum' started by Black_cats, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. Black_cats

    Black_cats SENIOR MEMBER

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    Israel, Bangladesh Adopt Legislation to Limit Lead in Paint
    LEILA MEAD
    Thematic Expert for Climate Change and Sustainable Energy (US)

    8 October 2019

    http://sdg.iisd.org/news/israel-bangladesh-adopt-legislation-to-limit-lead-in-paint/
    Photo Credit: Russn_Fckr/Unsplash

    STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    -Israel has set a 90 ppm lead limit for all paints, while Bangladesh has established a 90 ppm lead limit for decorative paints.

    -The most effective means of preventing lead exposure from paints is to establish national laws, including legislation, regulations and/or legally binding standards that ban the use of lead additives in paints.

    -No known level of lead exposure is considered safe for adults or children.


    Israel has set a 90 ppm lead limit for all paints, while Bangladesh has established a 90 ppm lead limit for decorative paints.

    The most effective means of preventing lead exposure from paints is to establish national laws, including legislation, regulations and/or legally binding standards that ban the use of lead additives in paints.

    No known level of lead exposure is considered safe for adults or children.

    30 September 2019: Israel and Bangladesh have adopted laws to address lead in paint, bringing the total number of countries with legally binding controls to limit the production, import and sale of lead paints to 73.

    Israel has set a 90 ppm lead limit for all paints, while Bangladesh has established a 90 ppm lead limit for decorative paints. Lead can be found in decorative paint for interiors and exteriors of homes, schools, public and commercial buildings, as well as on toys, furniture and playgrounds.

    An increasing number of countries are taking steps to eliminate lead paint, in part as a result of recent regional workshops aimed at building support for phasing out lead in paint, underscoring the need for effective laws, promoting regulatory action by governments and raising awareness on the Lead in Paint Component of a Global Environment Facility (GEF)-supported project on ‘Global Best Practices on Emerging Chemical Policy Issues of Concern Under the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM).’

    The most effective means of preventing lead exposure from paints is to establish national laws, including legislation, regulations and/or legally binding standards that ban the use of lead additives in paints. At a minimum, countries are called on to stop the manufacture, import and sale of household decorative lead paints, and to consider limiting lead in all types of paints.

    To combat lead poisoning and use, the Lead in Paint Component of the SAICM/GEF Project promotes regulatory and voluntary action by government and industry to phase out lead in paint. The project was launched in January 2019 during an inception workshop in Geneva, Switzerland, and will run through 2021.

    In addition, the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lead Paint aims to prevent exposure to lead, promote the phase out of paints containing lead, and seeks to ensure that all countries have lead paint laws in place by 2020. The Alliance is a voluntary partnership established by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

    Lead-containing paint is one of the major sources of lead exposure for children globally, and was identified as an Emerging Policy Issue by SAICM. Lead poisoning causes intellectual disabilities in approximately 600,000 children every year and can have lifelong health impacts. No known level of lead exposure is considered safe for adults or children. [Update on the Global Status of Legal Limits of Lead in Paint: September 2019] [UNEP Fact Sheet on Suggested Steps for Establishing a Lead Paint Law] [Update on the SAICM GEF Project] [SDG Knowledge Hub Sources]
     
  2. Bilal9

    Bilal9 ELITE MEMBER

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    98% of the paint in Bangladesh is re-packaged re-containerized paint that comes in from India in bulk. Indians are controlling all paint companies in Bangladesh as directors in every board...

    The reason why ALL paint doesn't need to have 90 ppm lead limit in Bangladesh is because majority of paint is outdoor paint (more than around 80%) and Indian paint market in Bangladesh would be affected. They successfully lobbied the govt. (with of course Sh. Hasina's help and blessing) to adopt this exception which very few of the countries in the world have. Using our money to make money to harm us. Amazing!

    At stake is Millions of dollars in Indian paints sales in Bangladesh. They are desperate.

    This woman needs to go. The case is getting stronger and stronger by the day...

    [​IMG]
    In picture: from Left Soumitra Roy, head of sales, Ritesh Doshi, country manager, Asian Paints Bangladesh Ltd; Tom Thomas, regional head, Asian Paints Int Ltd; Shamsul Alam, director, Asian Paints Bangladesh Ltd & Confidence Group, Rakesh Hamirwasia, head of finance, Jagdish Gaonker, head of supply chain & operations, and Aniket Samat, head of marketing, Asian Paints Bangladesh Ltd, present at a launching ceremony at International Convention City, Bashundhara in Dhaka on 21 April 2018. – Press

    They not only make money from us using their garbage product, they refuse to even employ any Bangladeshis to the top posts. Ch*tia Indian Haramkhors.

    Do you even foresee Bangladeshis doing this in India? Try it and see what happens.

    If Indians are selling everything to us, then how will our own brands develop? When are we going to learn to protect our own industry?? Where is OUR non-tariff Barrier and other protections?? They have a natural dumping advantage having far greater economies of scale...

    Someone in Bangladesh should do something about this.


    https://coatingstoday.com/new-products-in-bangladesh-market/
     
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  3. Nilgiri

    Nilgiri ELITE MEMBER

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    LOL, the delicious tears. SHW needs to go waaaaah. Good....she gets to stay and things get psychologically worse for the hypocrite fleas scattered outside. :D
     
  4. leonblack08

    leonblack08 SENIOR MEMBER

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    I understand your emotion, however, I do not agree with it.

    From my work experience, I can say that there are valid justifications for this. The MNCs in Banladesh typically hire Indian or any other expats for leading roles in Bangladesh for a couple of reasons.

    One, the skill pool in Bangladesh for highly skilled leaders are limited, that's why foreign employers resort to expats. Although this is now slowly changing, with many skilled leaders developing in Bangladesh and MNCs have started to promote them.

    Two, when MNCs look for expats, the Indian expats are cheaper compared to a Western expat. Plus, they have a better cultural understanding of Bangladeshi culture. And in this case, Asian Paints is an Indian company. So it is completely understandable that they will want to have their own as executives.

    Third, this is actually very true, many MNCs deliberately resort to hiring expats so that the Bangladeshi MPs and ministers cannot approach them for any sort of favor. Like giving a job to their relative. This sounds silly, but I can assure you it's the truth.
     
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  5. Bilal9

    Bilal9 ELITE MEMBER

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    Well you have your opinions and you have made them heard. One can explain away all the reasons why Indians get hired in Bangladesh instead of local folks, but it is STILL NOT RIGHT. This WOULD NOT happen if this was India.

    How many Bangladeshis can you name who go to India (no matter how talented) and get hired?? Most Indians are prejudiced small-minded ba$tards that would never give a Bangladeshi talented applicant a time-of-day. Forget Bangladeshi, North Indians are even prejudiced against Kolkata Dadas and South Indians. Even in the US Indians would never hire a Bangladeshi, when they have an Indian bhai available for a job. Bunch of low-lifes. Why should we be so effing generous in Bangladesh??

    The way you explained this is almost singing 'safai' for Indians, justifying this and that on why Indians 'deserve' jobs in Bangladesh over locals. This does not behoove a Bangladeshi person like you, at least I hope you are one. Even in the US, you have to jump over dozens of legal hoops to justify why you have to hire an outsider over a local citizen, and of course being Bangladesh, we have no law like this even on the books.

    In my experience, most expertise, credentials and talent claimed by Indians are almost all cheatery, fraud and dhokeybaaji that we Bangladeshis fall for. They will get trained in a six month course for some expertise then claim seven years of experience in it and with fictitious references on top of it. I have seen this myself. Shameless cheats of the first order. India is composed of a vast pool of lower class garbage 'talent', not everyone in India went to a convent boarding school/IIT and came out as a world-beater genius. Rarely so.

    In my estimation the primary issue in Bangladesh is that Indians are successfully trying to lobby and control our govt. policy (yes they have gone that far) so that Indian goods sell better in Bangladesh, to the detriment of Bangladeshi goods. How can we allow this??

    There is massive resentment among younger folks in Bangladesh that is boiling just below the surface. At some point this resentment will boil over and untoward things will happen (as it always does when limits are crossed). We have seen riots in Bangladesh before, and expat Indians will be the prime target.

    We have also seen this already where Arthur Andersen's India consultancy office in Dhaka had to close down shop in Bangladesh and most of their Indian staff had to leave town in a hurry.

    The fact that Bangladesh govt. is not considering any timely antidote against these possibilities is a bad omen.
     
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  6. Petrichor

    Petrichor FULL MEMBER

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    Keep barking.Your drivels serve no point except increasing post counts.
     
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  7. leonblack08

    leonblack08 SENIOR MEMBER

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    Salam.

    First of all, calm down. You don't need to get triggered any time you come across another person does not share the same opinion.

    I could be wrong, but I get the feeling that you seem to have this idea that a MNC investing in a country is required to hire whoever the host country wants. It does not work that way. At least not for private investments. There are corporate policies that need to be complied with. The corporate guidelines will dictate whom to hire and from where they deem fit. You will not see a GrameenPhone CEO who is a Bangladeshi, instead of a Norweigian. Nor will you see a non-US country head for Chevron Bangladesh. The list goes on for Chinese, Korean, Japanese and Indian MNCs.

    And to clarify again, I was discussing expats who are in the top leadership positions in these MNCs in Bangladesh. You can refer to my original post. These people cannot be in those positions without years and years of experience behind them. And these people are qualified. MNCs don't work like the shorkari offices of Bangladesh. I don't see how Bangladeshi youth being resentful about not getting jobs would even matter in this particular case.

    Now do Indians lobby Bangladesh govt.? Of course they do. Every single MNC does that to avail of favorable legislation and tax breaks. It is all part of the business. Plain and simple.

    But it is not the only reason for Indians being employed in Bangladesh, as you have been adamantly trying to assert. There are other ground realities that you are perhaps not aware of. I was merely pointing those out.

    Now what I would be really mad about is if Bangladesh Govt. started hiring Indians on Bangladesh Govt. project. That is something we should be legitimately angry about. That's because as Bangladeshi citizens, we reserve the right to work for our govt., not foreigners. But this discussion wasn't about that is it?

    I prefer telling the truth, even if it means justifying someone I don't like. That is the Islamic way.

    I understand your dislike for India, and I share it too when it comes to Indian govt. policies against Muslims and Bangladesh. But blindly blaming all our shortcomings towards them, without being aware of the whole picture, only makes us look like whiney entitled kids.

    Finally, for that little jab towards my citizenship and patriotism- I simply do not need to prove my patriotism to anyone here. You are free to think whatever you want to think. Whatever makes you happy.

    Thank you
     
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