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Iranian Space program

aryobarzan

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@K210 Next time you are sitting in a "North Korean" synagogue..praying for Iranian space failures..remember NOOR-2 is now taking photos of interesting places and by the way while you are at it tell this fellow ignorant fool (Benny Gantz) that "chabahar" and Qeshem are in the Persian gulf and not in middle of Iran..:azn::azn:
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Hack-Hook

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@K210 Next time you are sitting in a "North Korean" synagogue..praying for Iranian space failures..remember NOOR-2 is now taking photos of interesting places and by the way while you are at it tell this fellow ignorant fool (Benny Gantz) that "chabahar" and Qeshem are in the Persian gulf and not in middle of Iran..:azn::azn:
View attachment 821982
I doubt Noor or Noor 2 have any game changing surveillance capability
 

sha ah

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It likely weighs 8 KG. Omid which was put into orbit in 2009 weighed around 27 KG. It's a nice morale boost but nothing more. The space agency, you can criticize their failures all you want but atleast they're trying to place a 100 kg payload into space and realistically the last time only the last stage failed.

I doubt Noor or Noor 2 have any game changing surveillance capability
 
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TheImmortal

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I doubt Noor or Noor 2 have any game changing surveillance capability

Tough to put “game changing” capabilities in a cube sat. Still no unfolding solar panels or in orbit thrusters. Unfolding solar panel tech was supposed to be tested back in 2012, heard nothing since then. Even a prototype was built.

This is basically 1980’s tech at best. Which is very peculiar because It is 2022 and Iran has access to latest tech raw materials, supercomputer modeling, etc. etc. and open source information to get a jump start in this field.

How can a nation that is working on quantum computing tech, not be able to develop a more modern satellite in over 13 years? They just don’t go hand in hand, it’s illogical at best.

So whatever the reason is (forget speculating), Iran def has the capability for more modern sats. I’m not saying they can come close to EU or USA public satellites (NASA or ESA imaging capability) let alone spy satellites that are usually 10-20 years ahead of public tech. But Iran doesn’t really need that at this time.

It just needs sats that can help drone guidance and weapons guidance (outside of wartime) as well as easier Intel imaging and keeping track of enemy strategic forces movement (air defenses, radars, military bases, etc.) to be able to better update war plans.
 

sha ah

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It's not 1980's technology, it's today's technology but onboard a very tiny satellite. It's like a 6u cubesat, and each u weighs no more than 1.3 kg so it likely weighs no more than 8 kg. For reference the Omid satellite launched in 2008 weighed 27 kg.

It's not that Iran can't produce better satellites, it's the fact that Iran hasn't been able to place a sufficient payload into orbit successfully. The last Simorgh launch had a payload of around 100 kg and it failed.

These are the quality of images that Nour-1 can capture. Not that impressive to be honest. Still only 9 countries in the world can even do this by themselves but still we Iranians have higher expectations.

image.jpg


Tough to put “game changing” capabilities in a cube sat. Still no unfolding solar panels or in orbit thrusters. Unfolding solar panel tech was supposed to be tested back in 2012, heard nothing since then. Even a prototype was built.

This is basically 1980’s tech at best. Which is very peculiar because It is 2022 and Iran has access to latest tech raw materials, supercomputer modeling, etc. etc. and open source information to get a jump start in this field.

How can a nation that is working on quantum computing tech, not be able to develop a more modern satellite in over 13 years? They just don’t go hand in hand, it’s illogical at best.

So whatever the reason is (forget speculating), Iran def has the capability for more modern sats. I’m not saying they can come close to EU or USA public satellites (NASA or ESA imaging capability) let alone spy satellites that are usually 10-20 years ahead of public tech. But Iran doesn’t really need that at this time.

It just needs sats that can help drone guidance and weapons guidance (outside of wartime) as well as easier Intel imaging and keeping track of enemy strategic forces movement (air defenses, radars, military bases, etc.) to be able to better update war plans.
 

Sineva

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It's not 1980's technology, it's today's technology but onboard a very tiny satellite. It's like a 6u cubesat, and each u weighs no more than 1.3 kg so it likely weighs no more than 8 kg. For reference the Omid satellite launched in 2008 weighed 27 kg.

It's not that Iran can't produce better satellites, it's the fact that Iran hasn't been able to place a sufficient payload into orbit successfully. The last Simorgh launch had a payload of around 100 kg and it failed.

These are the quality of images that Nour-1 can capture. Not that impressive to be honest. Still only 9 countries in the world can even do this by themselves but still we Iranians have higher expectations.

View attachment 822032
Yes,its the slvs that are at the heart of the problem,not the satellites.Hopefully the simorgh will be scrapped as it is apparent that it will never be able to achieve the level of reliability needed,it also makes no sense to continue wasting resources trying to improve it now that iran has access to more advanced technology,such as the 4d10 for instance or the new 1.5m solid fuel engines.
I think that even had rouhani not gutted the space program,the simorgh would probably never have been able to achieve its goals,as the technology used was just to limited and in order to try and improve it to the minimum level necessary it was pushed beyond its capabilities,at which point it was no longer reliable.
 

sha ah

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Another 8 KG satellite into space ? What's the point ? The picture quality is not even sufficient enough to show hot aircraft on parking aprons. Google earth has better image quality and in this day and age it's not difficult to access up to the date, quality satellite imagery.

I mean it's a start and a morale boost for sure. Also having two Noor satellites in space instead of 1 enables the IRGC to acquire an image once every 45 minutes instead of 90 minutes with one satellite. Anyways let's see if they're actually able to place a 100 or 200 kg payload into orbit.

Nour-3 in 6 month with all solid fuel missile
 
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sha ah

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I'm not so sure if the Simorgh SLV should be completely abandoned. The only issue right now is the last and final stage which isn't reaching the necessary speeds required to place the payload into LEO.

Anyways they're already working on the Zuljanah SLV which is the successor to the Simorgh. So far the first test was successful so let's see what happens now that the space program is actually being funded properly.

Yes,its the slvs that are at the heart of the problem,not the satellites.Hopefully the simorgh will be scrapped as it is apparent that it will never be able to achieve the level of reliability needed,it also makes no sense to continue wasting resources trying to improve it now that iran has access to more advanced technology,such as the 4d10 for instance or the new 1.5m solid fuel engines.
I think that even had rouhani not gutted the space program,the simorgh would probably never have been able to achieve its goals,as the technology used was just to limited and in order to try and improve it to the minimum level necessary it was pushed beyond its capabilities,at which point it was no longer reliable.
 

TheImmortal

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Simorgh has already been abandoned in most sense of the word. It’s 2011 technology. It’s not anything new, it just took forever to be used.

Zoljanah (Safir-3) is likely replacement and that has had one success and one failure (I believe).

Too early to say if Zoljanah has similar problems to Simorgh. First two stages are solid and 3rd is liquid. It all comes down to power generation in first two stages. If it’s comparable to Simorgh in terms of power generation then we will have the similar problems (failure to insert due to not enough velocity to escape Earth’s pull) even if the launch itself is successful.
 

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