• Sunday, August 9, 2020

Iranian Missiles | News and Discussions

Discussion in 'Iranian Defence Forum' started by The SiLent crY, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Fajr-3 (missile)

    Type : Strategic MRBM

    In service : 2006–present

    Warhead : Three

    Engine : Liquid

    Operational range : Unknown (estimated 2500 km)

    Guidance system : inertial


    The Iranian-made Fajr-3 (meaning "dawn" in Persian and Arabic) is believed to be a medium-range ballistic missile with an unknown range (estimated 2,000 km, 1,250 miles). Iranian officials have said that the missile can avoid radar detection and has multiple independently targeted reentry vehicles (MIRV).

    The Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps unveiled the missile during the Holy Prophet wargames on March 31, 2006. Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force commander Gen. Hossein Salami announced on television "the successful test-firing of a new missile with greater technical and tactical capabilities than those previously produced". He also said that the missile would carry three warheads, and that each warhead would be capable of hitting its target precisely. He did not specify the missile's range, which can vary with the payload.

    Will be continued later
     
  2. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Ashoura (missile) :

    November 2007, Iranian Defence Minister Mostafa Mohammad-Najjar announced Iran had built a new missile with a range of 2000 km, the Ashoura missile. Najar said: "The Islamic Republic of Iran has never aimed to launch an attack on any country. It will never do so. But if someone wants to invade Iran, they will face a crushing response by the armed forces." He did not say how the missile differed from the Shahab-3, which has a range of 2100 km.

    He told the gathering Basij militia during the manoeuvres they were holding that same week that: "The construction of the Ashoura missile, with the range of 2,000 km, is among the accomplishments of the Defence Ministry."

    According to Jane's Defence Weekly, the Ashoura represents a major breakthrough in Iranian missile technology. It is the first two stage MRBM using solid fueled rocket motors instead of the existing liquid fueled technology used on the Shahab. This would dramatically reduce the setup and deployment time for the missile and hence, shorten the amount of warning time for the enemy and increase accuracy. Jane's noted that while the development parallels Pakistan's Shaheen MRBM there is no evidence to suggest there had been any prior technology exchange or with its other known technology partners such as North Korea, India or China The Ashoura was developed by the Shahid Bagheri Industrial Group (SBIG) under the Sanam Industrial Group (Department 140) which is part of the Defense Industries Organization (DIO) of Iran.

    This missile is similar to Shahab 3 and I couldn't find any verified picture


    Type : Strategic MRBM

    In service : 28 November 2007–present

    Diameter : 1.2 m

    Warhead : One

    Engine : solid

    Operational range : 2000 ~ 2500 km

    Guidance system : inertial
     
  3. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Ghadr-1

    The Ghadr-1 is a medium-range ballistic missile currently being designed and developed by Iran. Sources indicate that the missile will have a range of approximately 1800 km, which would allow it to attack targets in Israel and across the Middle East. Given recent reports from 2008, it is possible that this missile system is operational, yet there have been no conclusive or publicly visible tests of the weapon. The only acknowledgement of the Ghadr-1 is its public display on parade and unconfirmed reports of ground testing of its propulsion system.

    The Ghadr-1 appears to be an improved variant of the Shahab-3A, also referred to as the Ghadr-101 and the Ghadr-110. There are mixed reports regarding the new missile. In 2004, it was believed to have a liquid-fuel first stage and a solid-fuel second stage. According to Jane’s Strategic Weapon Systems, this would allow it to have a range of 1950 km. The length is thought to be 15.86 m, with a launch weight of about 19,000 kg. If reports regarding the Ghadr-1 accuracy are correct, then it would be a significant improvement of the Shahab 3 (2,500 CEP). A December 2008 report noted an CEP of 300 for the Ghadr-1. Reports also indicate the possibility that Ghadr could be designed to carry a nuclear payload. This possibility is raised with uncertainty as the Ghadr appears to be comparable to the Shahab system, whose apparent goal is to obtain such a payload.

    The Ghadr-1 is also believed to have a higher maneuverability than the Shahab-3. While some sources believe that it is the same missile as the Shahab 4, the higher maneuverability as well as the 30 minute set-up time provide sufficient evidence to consider this a separate missile. Additionally, sources from 2007 report that the Ghadr 1 may have a significantly shorter stated range than originally projected in 2004. It remains classified as an MRBM and is now considered distinct from its shorter range, Shahab-3, and longer range, Shahab-4, counterparts. Sources also indicate that the Ghadr-1 is being manufactured entirely in Iran at the top-secret Hemmat Missile Industries Complex. An article from December 2007, though, cites interaction between the German Intelligence agencies and Iranian nationals within German borders. The report states that on more than one occasion Iranian nationals have been held in conjunction with the smuggling of “dual use goods.” These items are usually converted for their secondary use, military needs, in Iran after their transit from Germany. Reports indicate that these dual use goods were used in the development of the Ghadr-1 missile system.

    In December of 2004 the National Council of Resistance of Iran claimed ongoing research and ground testing of the Ghadr-1. In March 2006, the Paris-based Iranian opposition group, the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), claimed that Iran had ramped up its development of the Ghadr-1, allegedly 70 percent complete at the time. The NCRI added that the new missile was expected to be entirely complete in one year’s time. Reports from October 2007 indicate that Teheran unveiled the Ghadr whose shape was very similar to that of the Shahab-3 MRBM.

    Class : MRBM

    Length : 15.86 m

    Launch Weight : 19000 kg

    Warhead : Nuclear , chemical , HE , submunitions

    Propulsion : Liquid first-stage , solid second-stage propellant

    Range : 1950 km

    In Service : 2007


     
  4. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Sejil missiles

    Class : IRBM

    Basing : Road-mobile

    Length : 17.6 m

    Diameter : 1.25 m

    Launch Weight : 23600 kg

    Payload : Single warhead , 500-1500 kg

    Warhead : HE or nuclear

    Propulsion : Two-stage solid propellant

    Range : 2000 km

    Status : Presumed Operational

    In Service : 2012


    The Sejil missile is a two stage, solid-propellant, intermediate-range ballistic missile domestically designed and built by Iran. It represents the culmination of Iranian weapons technology as it borrows heavily from the design and technology of the liquid-propelled Shahab missiles while integrating the solid-propellant technology of the Zelzal missiles.

    Development of the Sejil missile likely began in the late 1990s, but the program can hardly be understood apart from other Iranian missile programs whose development began much earlier. Most importantly, Iran began development on the Zelzal missiles in 1994 or 1995. The production of the Zelzal missiles required Iran to develop the domestic ability to produce composite solid-propellant in fairly large quantities. The technology and equipment used in Zelzal fuel production has almost definitely been used for the Sejil missile project. It is believed that China aided Iran in the improvement of their solid-propellant production ability for the Zelzal missiles; it seems likely that China has also aided Iran in the production of fuel for the Sejil missile.

    At the same time that Iran was developing composite solid-propellant fuel, they were working with the North Korean No Dong 1 missile design to produce the Shahab 3. The Shahab 3 design was used by Iranian engineers to produce a number of domestic missile technologies – a major advance from earlier Shahab designs, which relied almost entirely on Russian and North Korean technology. The Shahab 3 variants have provided a number of advantages over the original North Korean design and proved that Iranian engineers can domestically design and produce improved warheads and SLVs. The Sejil missile, internally quite different from the Shahab 3 missile (solid propellants require very different motors and internal design), probably borrows from a number of Shahab 3 technologies. At the very least, it is believed that the RV/nose cone design that first appeared in Shahab 3 variants has been used on the Sejil missile.

    Though the missile has a similar size, weight, payload, and range to the Shahab 3 variants, the fact that it is fuelled by solid-propellants is a huge improvement over the Shahab design. Solid propellants allow for a near-immediate launch time, leaving the missile much less vulnerable during launch. Because solid-propellant missiles do not have to be fuelled immediately prior to launch, they are also much more easily transported. On the other hand, solid propellant missiles have particular performance characteristics that make them more difficult to guide and control. How Iranian engineers have overcome these hurdles is unknown, but it seems likely that they have modified Shahab guidance systems and/or received considerable foreign assistance.

    The Sejil missile has a length of 17.6 m, a diameter of 1.25 m, and an overall launch weight of 23,600 kg. It carries a payload of 500 to 1,000 kg. Presumably the missile will carry HE warheads until Iran gains nuclear warheads. The missile’s maximum range is about 2,000 km, though these figures are based upon a missile fuselage with the weight and performance characteristics of aeronautical-grade steel. Supposing that Iran had the technology to produce missiles built of maraging steel, titanium, or composite material, the missile would potentially be lighter and have an extended range upwards of 2,400 km.

    The first test launch occurred in 2008 and the missile reportedly flew 800km. A second launch was conducted in May 2009 to test improved guidance and navigation systems. Four other flight tests have occurred since 2009, with the sixth test flying approximately 1,900 km into the Indian ocean.

    The Sejil missile appears to be a unique Iranian design. Though some speculation has tied the missile to the Chinese DF-11 and DF-15, the size and specifications of the missile suggest that the Iranian missile is unique. Unlike earlier Iranian systems, the missile also does not appear to be a copy of a previously-released North Korean missile. Of course, it is highly likely that the missile project has made significant gains through foreign assistance. Because the design is new, Iran will probably have to subject it to a great deal of testing before putting the missile into regular operation. Assuming that the Sejil project moves at about the same speed as foreign missile development projects, Iran will probably not declare the missile operational until at least 2012.

    The Sejil missile system may be operational, but regardless, Iran continues to make improvements. There may be multiple versions of the Sejil system. In 2009, Iran referred to the test launch as the Sejil 2. An unconfirmed report stated the a Sejil 3 may be in development. The Sejil 3 would reportedly have three stages, a maximum range of 4,000 km, and a launch weight of 38000 kg .


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Sejil
     
  5. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Sejil
     
  6. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    5.Long-range ballistic missiles :

    Shahab-4

    Safir

    Kosar




    Shahab 4


    Class : MRBM

    Warhead : HE , chemica l, nuclear

    Range : 2000 to <4000 km

    Status : Unknown


    The Shahab 4 has been mentioned in many media and intelligence reports over the last ten years. Unfortunately, those reports have frequently been contradictory and their sum does not provide a clear picture of the Shahab 4 missile project. The program, in fact, may not actually exist. Assuming that the missile is in development, it would probably borrow from the technologies of the Shahab 3 while improving performance characteristics to allow for greater range, a heavier payload, and increased accuracy.

    Though Iranian missile development has progressed dramatically in the last 15 years, many experts believe that the Shahab 4 borrows from foreign missile design. In keeping with the North Korea-Pakistan-Iran missile relationship, some speculate that the Shahab 4 is based off of the North Korean No Dong 2 or Taepo Dong 1 missiles or the Pakistani Hatf 5A. Other sources suggest that the Shahab 4 is based on defunct Russian technology from the SS-4 or SS-N-6.

    The No Dong 2 and the Hatf 5A are obvious comparisons with the Shahab 4. The Shahab 3 was based upon the same technology as the No Dong 1 and the Hatf 5, so it makes some sense that the improved versions of those missiles would form the basis of the newer Shahab missile. Of course, Iran has already greatly improved upon the Shahab 3, as discussed in the Shahab 3 variants entry. If the Shahab 4 is based upon the No Dong 2 and Hatf 5A, then it is probably one of the many Shahab 3 variants and not a separate project. Given the tendency of Iranian officials to name and rename projects, this conclusion is likely accurate.

    The SS-4 was 22.8 m long with a diameter of 1.65 m and a launch weight of 42,000 kg. Its 1,600 kg payload contained a single separating warhead. It used a single-stage liquid propellant engine and an inertial guidance system. The SS-4 had a range of 2,000 km (1,243 miles) and an abysmal accuracy of 2,400 m CEP. Depending on the similarity between the Shahab 4 and the SS-4, these figures may not be relevant. It is believed that the Shahab 4 will have an accuracy of between 2,500 and 3,500 m CEP and a range of between 2,000 and 3,000 km (1,243 to 1,864 miles).

    The Soviet SS-N-6 bears similar specifications to the SS-4 and the projected specifications for Shahab 4, but with increased accuracy (1,000m CEP), greater range (2,500-4,000 km), and a lighter payload (1,200kg). Originally submarine launched, the SS-N-6 is believed to have been modified by North Korean, and finally adjusted and assembled by Iran for use as a land-based missile. At the fall of the Soviet Union, many of these SLBMs remained in operational condition. Reports indicate that one or more of these weapons made their way to North Korea before North Korea delivered some of these missiles to Iran.

    In 2003 Iran announced that it would close the Shahab 4 program in favor of an SLV program (Satellite Launch Vehicle). Since that time, Iran has had some success with a domestic space program that has successfully put a small satellite into orbit. Regardless of the space program, however, talk of a Shahab 4 has not completely quieted and many believe that a missile with this designator is still in development. The Shahab 3 and its variants can hardly meet many conceivable range and payload objectives, so it seems reasonable to expect that a new missile is in development.

    If the Shahab 4&#8242;s reported range of 2,000 km range is correct, the missile will have the capability to target all of Israel, as well as Turkey, much of India, and US forces stationed in Iraq, Afghanistan, or the Persian Gulf. The missile could substantially increase the political and military leverage held by the Iranian government, especially if Iran develops a nuclear warhead.

    An additional threat is the possibility that Iran will give or sell its missile technology to rogue nations or terrorist organizations antagonistic toward the U.S. At present, Iran&#8217;s missiles are stored and operated in underground sites under the complete control of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which enjoys little outside supervision within Iran. General Mahmud Chahar Baghi of the IRGC stated in 2008 that any act of Israeli aggression would be retorted by the launching of 11,000 missiles within the first minute.

    The Iranian missile program has been shrouded in secrecy, deception, and the unknown. Iran obtains weapons of various design and origin, and frequently retains a single name and reclassifies its physical missile assets, which adds to the confusion. According to Defense Minister Najjar, when asked about the testing of the Shahab 4, &#8220;Names and titles are not important in this regard. The important point, though, is that we are proceeding according to our defense doctrine&#8230;&#8221; At present the future of the Iranian missile program is uncertain, but the existence of these missiles proves that ballistic missiles are no longer the purview of first world nations. If the US and its allies are to remain safe, they must deploy missile defense systems capable of undermining the effectiveness of these now ubiquitous offensive systems.


    Safir

    The Safir (Persian: &#1587;&#1601;&#1740;&#1585;&#8206;, meaning "ambassador") is the name of the first Iranian expendable launch vehicle that is able to place a satellite in orbit. The first successful orbital launch using the Safir launch system took place on 2 February 2009 when a Safir-2 carrier rocket placed the Omid satellite into an orbit with a 245.2 km (152.4 mi) apogee.

    A sub-orbital test flight, named Kavoshgar-1 (Persian: &#1705;&#1575;&#1608;&#1588;&#1711;&#1585; &#1777;&#8206;, "Explorer-1"), was conducted on 4 February 2008, as announced by state-run television. A launch on 25 February 2007, may also have been of the same type. The first flights carried instruments to measure the higher atmosphere. The rocket launched on 4 February 2008 was a liquid-propellant-driven rocket, probably a derivative of the Shahab-3, that reached an altitude of 200&#8211;250 km in space, and successfully returned science data according to the Iranian News Agency.

    On 19 February 2008, Iran offered new information about the rocket and announced that Kavoshgar-1 used a two staged rocket. The first stage separated after 100 seconds and returned to earth with the help of a parachute. The second stage continued its ascent to the altitude of 200 kilometres. However it was not intended to reach orbital velocity.

    Earlier reports by the Iranian News Agency suggested that Kavoshgar-1 used a three staged rocket with the first stage separating after 90 seconds and the rocket reaching an orbit between 200 and 250 kilometres.

    The successful development and launch of a sounding-space-rocket was already announced a year earlier, on 25 February 2007. It is unknown if the sounding rocket launched on 25 February 2007, and the rocket launched on 4 February 2008, are of the same type.

    Safir-1

    On 17 August 2008, Iranian officials reported that a Safir was launched successfully without a payload, in preparation for the launch of Iran's first indigenously launched satellite, Omid . Reza Taghizadeh, head of the Iranian Aerospace Organization, told state television "The Safir (Ambassador) satellite carrier was launched today and for the first time we successfully launched a dummy satellite into orbit". As it was announced by Iran, a dummy satellite was put into a 650 km LEO passing over Iran six times every 24 hours.

    Alleged failure

    According to an American official, "The vehicle failed shortly after liftoff and in no way reached its intended position." However, the video of the liftoff of the rocket was shown on the Iranian state television for several minutes.[13] Iranian officials released a statement denouncing the allegations as propaganda and stated that Iran would soon launch the Omid satellite. Iran indeed launched the satellite on 2 February 2009, less than six months later.


    Safir-2


    On 2 February 2009, a Safir rocket conducted Iran's first orbital launch, with the Omid satellite. The two-staged launch vehicle named SAFIR-2 was 22 m long with a diameter of 1.25 m, weighing about 26 tonnes. The 27 kg Omid satellite was launched into an orbit with a 245.5 km perigee and 381.2 km apogee. The evidence is mounting that Safir-2 was more powerful and advanced than initially thought.

    Safir-2 Block-II

    Iran has begun the development of the planned Block-II Safir booster intended to double its payload capacity with the intent to make it operational by some time in 2010. The launch vehicle is to acquire its increased payload capacity into low earth orbit through the addition of two Samen, solid motor strap-on boosters added to the Shahab-3C derived first stage and possible a new solid motor third stage added to the existing two stage Safir space booster. The announcement of the development start on this booster was made on 14 April 2009 by the Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. This booster is capable of placing satellite in 700-kilometre (430-mile) orbits or doubling its payload capacity. Iran is known to be combining these liquid propellant and solid motor technologies to the development of a more capable Safir block-II class space booster expected in 2010 with over twice the capability of the present Safir space booster. Iran is known to be working on a new, nearly all solid propellant boosters with a payload capacity of 330 kilograms to low earth orbit. On the maiden flight of the Safir-B rocket, designated Safir-B1, from a launch site in Semnan Province, Iran's third indigenous satellite, the 15.3 kg Rasad 1 was launched. The launch occurred at approximately 09:14 UTC on 15 June 2011 with the spacecraft reaching orbit several minutes later.

    In February 3, 2012, the 50 kg Navid satellite was launched by an upgraded Safir-2 rocket with 20% more thrust. The second stage of the new rocket was wider.


    Alleged failures


    As were alleged, non-announced by Iran two failed launches of Fajr Earth imaging satellites occurred from Semnan spaceport on May, 23 and October in 2012 .

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Safir
     
  7. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    • Thanks Thanks x 4
  8. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    6.Surface to air missiles :


    Mehrab

    Mersad

    Sayyad 1 _ Sayyad 2

    Shahab Saqeb

    Raad



    Mentioned systems are the ones that have been locally manufactured or improved by Iran . ( Not Foreign systems like Hwak , Tor M1 and ... )

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Mehrab

    This missile has been manufactured by using the SM 1 missile technology . apart from improving the radar and electronic systems , mehrab has been resistant against electronic warfare and can change it's trajectory to source of electronic abnormalities .
     
  9. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Mersad radar


    Type : Air defense system

    In service : Since 2010

    Variants : Mersad, Mersad Phase I , Mersad Phase II (Under Development)

    Main armament : 3x Shahin or Shlamche Missiles

    Engine : Solid propellant rocket engine

    Operational range : Shahin:45 km(30 miles)

    Speed : More than Mach 2.4, Shalamche: Mach 3

    Guidance system : Semi-active radar homing



    Mersad (Persian: Ambush) is an Iranian advanced low to mid range Air defense system developed in 2010 . It fires Shahin (Falcon) missiles which are reverse engineered, domestically upgraded versions of the American MIM-23 Hawk Surface-to-air missiles. It uses a series of domestically produced Radars and Electronic Devices , and is capable of intercepting ballistic missiles .

    Development :

    In 2010, Iran announced that it had launched the production line of a new air defense system named, Mersad, which incorporates Shahin missiles . It was said that the system consists of different target tracing and tracking radars, soft and hardware networks, launch pads for Shahin missiles and a command and control center. Iranian defense minister Ahmad Vahidi said that the Mersad air defense system has superior capabilities and includes more capabilities than its western rivals like the Hawk mid-range defense system. Vahidi reiterated that Mersad is resistant to electronic warfare and can be used as part of a network of radar and air defense systems and is fully digital . The Shahin missile is an improved reverse engineered version of US made MIM-23 Hawk Surface to air missile sold to Iran before the 1979 revolution.

    Some months later, Iran announced that it has increased the range and altitude of the missile defense system. Vahidi also noted that the new system can also engage more targets at the same time.

    In November 2010, Iranian air force colonel Faramarz Ruh Afza said that Mersad has a limited ability to intercept ballistic missiles . That same day, the commander of Khatam al anbia base, Ahmad Miqani, said that Iran is working on the improving the Mersad with the second phase including double range and altitude .

    Iran tested the Mersad two days after Miqani's speech in an Air Defense Wargame called Defenders of the Skies of Velayat III. In this test, Iran shot down a UAV using its Mersad Air Defense System.

    Also in April 18, 2011, Iran tested two other missiles of Mersad from a site in Semnan. Later it was announced that the missiles were not Shahin. But a further upgraded one called Shalamche. Iranian Defense minister Ahmad Vahidi stated that the speed is now about mach 3 with an increase of about mach 0.6 . He called the missile state of art because of its new electronics which made it highly resistance to Electronic warfare. He said that the range of this missile is about 40 km and it is going to be increased.

    Later in May 16, Iran tested the new missile again in an air defense war game in eastern Iran.

    According to Iranian officials, the most important factors of new Mersad Phase I system are increase in range and a new advanced algorithm for guiding the missile into its target.

    In September 4, Iran announced that Shalamche missile is now being delivered to Iranian Air Defense Force.

    On November 14, 2012 ,The Shalamcheh missile was fired from the Mersad air defense system at a Karrar (UCAV), which was destroyed, during the Defenders of the Skies of Velayat 4 drill .

    Radars :

    Mersad uses three radars. The PAR radar, called Kavosh, is an upgraded copy of the original AN/MPQ-50. The maximum range is increased to 150 km and an IFF system is added to the radar. A new CWAR called Jouiya is used to detect low altitude targets. The HPIR radar is an upgraded version of AN/MPQ-46 with an additional EO system attached to it. All of the radars use solid state electronics to have more resistance to electronic warfare and can be linked to the other Mersad systems .

    Variants :


    Mersad : Basic variant. Uses the first generation of Shahin missiles.

    Mersad Phase I : Second variant. Tested on October 2010, this variant has a higher range and altitude. It is also capable of engaging more targets simultaneously.

    Mersad Phase II : Third variant. This variant is currently under development. It will have double the range and altitude as compared to the basic Mersad.

    Unknown Designation : Uses Shalamche missiles instead of Shahin.
     
  10. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Shahin missiles
     
  11. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Shahin missiles
     
  12. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Testing Mersad system
     
  13. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]Mersad radars

    To be continued
     
  14. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Sayyad 1

    Type : Low-to-High air defense missile system

    Guidance system : Guidance command to line of sight

    Propulsion : Two-stage solid

    Length : 10.84 m

    Launch Weight : 2320 kg

    Warhead missile : 195 kg

    Range : 20 km



    The Sayyad-1 (Hunter I) is a static surface-to-air missile system which is a development of the Russian S-75 (NATO SA-2 Guideline) system. The Sayad is also heavily influenced by the Chinese HQ-2 and may benefit from North Korean technology input. Iran has acquired surface-to-air missiles modified with chemical weapons. Western intelligence sources said Iran has acquired modified SA-2 air defense systems from North Korea. They said Pyongyang has converted the SA-2 from a surface-to-air to a surface-to-surface missile. On 14 April 1999 the Iranian armed forces carried out a successful test of a surface-to-air missile. A spokesman of the Iranian Ministry of Defense reported "the missile was able to hit its target at an appropriate altitude." This missile was designated Sayyad-1, named for assassinated commander Lt-Gen. Ali Sayyad-Shirazi. Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics spokesman Keyvan Khosrawi said that the missile was produced completely by the Airspace Industries Organization, affiliated to the Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics. Iranian defense ministry officials acknowledged that the Sayyad-1 missile was an SA-2 of Chinese design, but was at least partially manufactured in Iran .
     
  15. The SiLent crY

    The SiLent crY SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,528
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Ratings:
    +7 / 6,393 / -4
    Country:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    Location:
    Iran, Islamic Republic Of
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Sayyad 2

    Type : Low to High air defense missile system

    Guidance system : Guidance command to line of sight

    Propulsion : Two-stage solid propellant booster

    Length : 10.84 m

    Launch Weight : ? kg

    Warhead missile : 200 kg

    Speed : 3600 km/h

    Range : 80 -100 km


    The Sayad-2 static surface-to-air missile system is a further development of the Sayad-1 series, which in itself is a development of the Russian S-75 (NATO SA-2 Guideline) system. The Sayyad 2 is better in precision, range and destruction power. The Sayyad series is also heavily influenced by the Chinese HQ-2 and may benefit from North Korean technology input. Other reports not yet confirmed suggest the updated Sayyad series to be strongly influenced by HAWK and Standard missiles in current Iranian armed forces inventory. The Sayyad-2 was unveiled in April 2011. In May 2011, Commander of Khatam ol-Anbia Air Defense Base Brigadier General Farzad Esmayeeli told FNA (Iranian press agency that the new air-defense system Sayyad-2 has been deployed in all air-defense units across Iran.