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Iranian Chill Thread

EvilWesteners

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As SalarHagg mentioned, there is more speculation than there is actual/factual confirmation that Iran has ordered or if so, it will indeed receive Su-35s or Su-30s. With regards to this, it is hard to decipher fact from fiction, since there are a lot of political reasons why lying is introduced deliberately by governments or aviation companies.

I would still maintain that Iran can build a fighter jet of its own, if the government decides to invest and there is political will to do so. The benefits of having a domestic fighter jet project is huge, both economic benefits as well as R&D in technology. Iran does not need the BEST fighter jet in the world for its defense. It just needs, a good-enough fighter jet for the next 10 years, both for deterrence value as well as pre- and post war use, if needed.

Iran can simply upgrade F-14, with good enough engines, and the upgrade technologies that they have, at least, partially demonstrated in other weapons developments, ARE DOABLE for Iran and can build and implement.

However, Iran does need NEW airframes, new engines, IRST with liquid nitrogen cooling capsule, radar warning systems, secure 1024bit datalink now being added to Rafale, or at the least 256bit, link up to local ground stations and other fighters for at least 200km, and a few things that make the aircraft have the capability to hold its own in air combat. I'm sure Iran already knows that ALMOST all of Iran's communications are already compromised. IF they don't know that, they are foolish. The U.S. military went almost crazy when Trump mentioned ONE SENTENCE regarding the downing of the RQ-4A because the jackass hinted to Iran that they knew that no permission was obtained from headquarters through the electronic channels the U.S. is listening to 24/7. Iran may already know this and uses non-electronic measures, as most military commands implement for that same reason.

Iran CAN build a fighter jet, yes indeed, it can do this. Let me give you the undeniable REALISTIC indication of this.

Israel built nukes with the support of U.S. (after JFK was assassinated with the help of Robert Maxwell and Yitzhak Shamir), technology theft/transfer from France, fissile material shipped from UK (through Norway), and funding from Zionist billionaires from all over the world (mostly Europe and US).

Iran has built its entire nuclear infrastructure (for weapons) IF IT WANTS TO BUILD ONE, all on its down, while being hunted down for every part/component/material, while under full IAEA and NPT, and the much higher degree of oversight than any other country on earth, with only very minor help from Pakistan's nuclear godfather (only plans for enrichment rather than actual help).

No one else has done this much, under this level of scrutiny, this degree of espionage/sabotage and covert operations with incredible amount of money spent by Iran's adversaries (and quite a few of them working against Iran). Still today, they are almost begging Iran to come to table and negotiate.

However, the calculus of Iran purchasing weapons from China or even Russia was never just about weapons acquisition/purchase. It was for "closer relationship and political support as a result of mutual financial relationship".

I hope Iran decides to purchase engines (if it needs be), or engine manufacturing TOT, or assembly or maintenance (like with Mil Mi17), or radars (AESA or hybrid PESA), etc. This would still serve Russia/China with financial gain of sorts, offer a degree of hands-off direct weapons delivery by either Russian/China, and still allow Iran to have the ability to build (relatively) large quantities of fighter jets for both deterrence and delivering a blow to adversaries, if needs be. This would also, potentially, limit industrial sabotage, as evident by components delivered to Iran for its nuclear program which were embedded with explosives, etc. although much harder to do with this.

I am most certainly one of the LEAST SMARTEST persons in the world, but I can make modifications to alloys used in an engine that would substantially limit the usefulness of a turbine engine, down to 100+ hours. Believe me, it is that simple, and I have every bit of confidence that Israel is VERY much capable of this, considering how much support they get from U.S./France/UK/Netherlands and others and how much money they get from the Arab bloc against Iran. Russia wouldn't care much and would blame Iran for poor maintenance. Remember the S-300 codes in Syria?

Even if Iran does acquire Su-35/Su-30s it will still need to start a self-sufficiency program to make sure if relationship with Russia goes sour, it can maintain its fleet, as they did with F-14 starting in 1975 onward.

For the price of a single Su-35, Iran can purchase 10+ AL31F engines (approx. $5.1m in Aug 2021), and I am not even including maintenance agreement cost, which is often equal or higher than the static blank purchase price of a fighter jet.

Hope Iran is being sensible, although I know they are under incredible pressure and their choices are far more limited than any other country on earth, with the exception of North Korea.

In either case, SOME of this will undoubtedly end up being a TOT, Russia willing or not. It will just be an expensive TOT cost, though. Iran learns from everything it purchases and will try to copy / reverse engieer. We'll see.

Good luck IRIAF.
 
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Sineva

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Poll: Iranians disillusioned with Biden, back turn toward East

There’s also no evidence of widespread opposition to the regime, contradicting claims from Washington hawks that sanctions would cause Iranians to rise up against it.


The Iranian public has grown increasingly disillusioned with the administration of U.S. President Joe Biden and the United States more generally and supports its new government’s emphasis on turning more to the East in its international political and economic relations, according to a new survey released Monday by the Iran Poll and the University of Maryland’s Center for International and Security Studies.
Conducted by phone and over the internet from August 30 to September 9, the poll, the latest of 10 conducted by the Iran Poll and the CISSM since 2014, found declining popular support for the 2015 nuclear deal, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, and overwhelming skepticism that the United States could ever be trusted to permanently abide by its terms.
Less than half of the 1001 respondents said they either “strongly” or “somewhat” approve of the JCPOA compared to nearly 75 percent in 2016, while a record 27 percent of respondents said they “strongly oppose” the deal. Nearly two-thirds of respondents said it was either “somewhat” or “very unlikely” that Washington would “live up to the JCPOA’s obligations” even if it agrees to rejoin the accord from which former President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew in 2017. Only a third said they thought it either “somewhat” or “very likely” that Washington would comply.
And while 27 percent of respondents said both Iran and the United States should be flexible in their negotiations to return to the JCPOA, 52 percent said Iran should hold firm to its demands and rely on Washington’s European allies to persuade Washington to accept them, and another 16 percent said Tehran shouldn’t even try to restore the accord.
The survey, which was taken just a few weeks after the inauguration of Ebrahim Raisi, found unprecedented support for the new president; 78 percent of respondents said they either “somewhat” (33 percent) or “very” (45 percent) favorable opinion of Raisi. That marked a 50 percent increase in his overall favorability ratings in May 2017 when he was soundly defeated by former President Hassan Rouhani.
Conversely, Rouhani, widely depicted by western media to be a “moderate” or a “reformist” compared to Raisi’s more hardline positions over the past four years, gets favorability ratings of only 20 percent. At the same time, nearly 60 percent of respondents said they retained a favorable impression of Rouhani’s foreign minister, Mohammed Javad Zarif, who negotiated the JCPOA on Iran’s behalf and who is widely seen as trying to steer Tehran’s foreign policy in a more westward direction.
Asked whether Iran should focus more on strengthening its diplomatic and trade relations with European countries such as Germany, France, and the United Kingdom, or should it try more to strengthen its diplomatic and trade relations with Asian countries like Russia, China, and India,” or both equally, a 54-percent majority cited the Asian countries, about six percentage points up from two years ago.
Fifty-seven percent of respondents said they had either a “very” or “somewhat” favorable impression of China — the second highest level since the question was first posed by the survey in 2014. That improvement was particularly remarkable considering the results a year ago when China’s favorability rate fell to less than 40 percent, apparently due to the widespread impression that the failure of China’s leadership to act more quickly to contain the COVID-19 pandemic had resulted in the virus’s spread to Iran where it has taken a devastating toll.
As to perceptions of the United States, a whopping 85 percent of respondents said their impressions were either “somewhat” (9.4 percent) or “very unfavorable” (75.9 percent). Of the countries on which respondents were asked to rate, only Saudi Arabia performed worse (89 percent unfavorable).
While Washington’s ratings in the latest poll were only two or three percentage points better than during the Trump years, the survey suggested that many Iranians have lost whatever hopes they may have held that Biden would be less hostile. Asked to rate Biden’s policies towards Iran on a scale of zero (completely hostile) to 10 (completely friendly), 67 percent give a score in the 0-4 range. In February 2021, only about half (52 percent) expected Biden’s policies to be hostile toward Iran. More than 40 percent of respondents gave Biden a zero or a one, compared to one out of three in February.
Hostility towards the United States is clearly deep-seated, reaching back to the birth of the Islamic Republic, the survey suggested. Seventy-six percent of respondents said they believe Washington had prior knowledge of recent explosions at the Natanz nuclear facility; 85 percent said they believe it had prior knowledge of the assassination — mostly attributed to Israel — of Iran’s nuclear scientists; 83 percent said it had prior knowledge of Da’esh 2014 offensive in Iraq; and 91 percent said it had prior knowledge of former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s 1980 invasion of Iran.
More than four out of five respondents (83 percent) expressed support for continuing or expanding ongoing diplomatic efforts to deescalate regional tensions, even though nearly half of those expressed skepticism that such efforts will bear fruit. And a 54-percent majority said Iran should try to find mutually acceptable solutions with other countries through negotiations as opposed to 43 percent who said it should seek to “become the most powerful country in the region.” Seven out of 10 respondents, however, defended Iran’s advanced ballistic missile program — a key concern of the United States, Israel, and Iran’s Persian Gulf Arab neighbors — as “very important.” Another 20 percent said it was “somewhat important.”
The survey found virtually no evidence of widespread discontent with the ruling regime itself to suggest that Islamic Republic is on or close to the verge of collapse, as some U.S. commentators have maintained. While 74 percent of respondents described the country’s economy as “somewhat” (19 percent) or “very” (54 percent) bad, nearly half blamed external factors, notably U.S. sanctions (27 percent) or COVID-19 (22 percent) as primarily responsible.
But a 54-percent majority said they expected ordinary Iranians will be living better three years from now. Moreover, the survey found that large majorities of respondents — from 70 to 80 percent — said they had either “some” or “a great deal” of trust in the country’s basic institutions of government, the judiciary, the president, and the parliament. Trust in the police and military was even higher, at 83 percent each.

Source https://responsiblestatecraft.org/2...sillusioned-with-biden-back-turn-toward-east/
The usual ar$eholes seem to be rather dismissive of the poll and its results,tho I`ve no doubt that if it had backed up their claims of widespread discontent amongst the populace,then the zionist shills would`ve been praising both it and its methodology. :sarcastic:
 

Dariush the Great

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We should never engage in these ridiculous claims. It will put us in the same level as Indians or those Turkish or Azari trolls. I have told people here many times not to repost such nonsense but some still do it here, unfortunately. Some are even still discussing the amount of enriched uranium we have! Not knowing the realities on the ground.
 

WudangMaster

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These filthy, bloated, degenerate, evil cannibals deserve the most gruesome and painful demise. I would love to wear their skin as leather jackets. I sincerely wish a slow agonizing death for the evil ones discussed in the video along with supporters and families.
We are the real humans on the right side of history and we will triumph over these evil bastards and urinate on their shattered bones and defecate into evil souls!
 

Shawnee

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View attachment 786359
View attachment 786360

Midget SLBM tested from the sub.

Iran ham sabre esteratejik felan
What matters here most:
You can practically launch an efficient SLBM from a 2000 ton submarine, assuming this is Sinpo class submarine, also called the Gorae ("whale"). NK has one of these active.

Iranian largest fully indigenous submarine is 1200 ton and one is active.
 

SalarHaqq

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As SalarHagg mentioned, there is more speculation than there is actual/factual confirmation that Iran has ordered or if so, it will indeed receive Su-35s or Su-30s. With regards to this, it is hard to decipher fact from fiction, since there are a lot of political reasons why lying is introduced deliberately by governments or aviation companies.

I would still maintain that Iran can build a fighter jet of its own, if the government decides to invest and there is political will to do so. The benefits of having a domestic fighter jet project is huge, both economic benefits as well as R&D in technology. Iran does not need the BEST fighter jet in the world for its defense. It just needs, a good-enough fighter jet for the next 10 years, both for deterrence value as well as pre- and post war use, if needed.

Iran can simply upgrade F-14, with good enough engines, and the upgrade technologies that they have, at least, partially demonstrated in other weapons developments, ARE DOABLE for Iran and can build and implement.

However, Iran does need NEW airframes, new engines, IRST with liquid nitrogen cooling capsule, radar warning systems, secure 1024bit datalink now being added to Rafale, or at the least 256bit, link up to local ground stations and other fighters for at least 200km, and a few things that make the aircraft have the capability to hold its own in air combat. I'm sure Iran already knows that ALMOST all of Iran's communications are already compromised. IF they don't know that, they are foolish. The U.S. military went almost crazy when Trump mentioned ONE SENTENCE regarding the downing of the RQ-4A because the jackass hinted to Iran that they knew that no permission was obtained from headquarters through the electronic channels the U.S. is listening to 24/7. Iran may already know this and uses non-electronic measures, as most military commands implement for that same reason.

Iran CAN build a fighter jet, yes indeed, it can do this. Let me give you the undeniable REALISTIC indication of this.

Israel built nukes with the support of U.S. (after JFK was assassinated with the help of Robert Maxwell and Yitzhak Shamir), technology theft/transfer from France, fissile material shipped from UK (through Norway), and funding from Zionist billionaires from all over the world (mostly Europe and US).

Iran has built its entire nuclear infrastructure (for weapons) IF IT WANTS TO BUILD ONE, all on its down, while being hunted down for every part/component/material, while under full IAEA and NPT, and the much higher degree of oversight than any other country on earth, with only very minor help from Pakistan's nuclear godfather (only plans for enrichment rather than actual help).

No one else has done this much, under this level of scrutiny, this degree of espionage/sabotage and covert operations with incredible amount of money spent by Iran's adversaries (and quite a few of them working against Iran). Still today, they are almost begging Iran to come to table and negotiate.

However, the calculus of Iran purchasing weapons from China or even Russia was never just about weapons acquisition/purchase. It was for "closer relationship and political support as a result of mutual financial relationship".

I hope Iran decides to purchase engines (if it needs be), or engine manufacturing TOT, or assembly or maintenance (like with Mil Mi17), or radars (AESA or hybrid PESA), etc. This would still serve Russia/China with financial gain of sorts, offer a degree of hands-off direct weapons delivery by either Russian/China, and still allow Iran to have the ability to build (relatively) large quantities of fighter jets for both deterrence and delivering a blow to adversaries, if needs be. This would also, potentially, limit industrial sabotage, as evident by components delivered to Iran for its nuclear program which were embedded with explosives, etc. although much harder to do with this.

I am most certainly one of the LEAST SMARTEST persons in the world, but I can make modifications to alloys used in an engine that would substantially limit the usefulness of a turbine engine, down to 100+ hours. Believe me, it is that simple, and I have every bit of confidence that Israel is VERY much capable of this, considering how much support they get from U.S./France/UK/Netherlands and others and how much money they get from the Arab bloc against Iran. Russia wouldn't care much and would blame Iran for poor maintenance. Remember the S-300 codes in Syria?

Even if Iran does acquire Su-35/Su-30s it will still need to start a self-sufficiency program to make sure if relationship with Russia goes sour, it can maintain its fleet, as they did with F-14 starting in 1975 onward.

For the price of a single Su-35, Iran can purchase 10+ AL31F engines (approx. $5.1m in Aug 2021), and I am not even including maintenance agreement cost, which is often equal or higher than the static blank purchase price of a fighter jet.

Hope Iran is being sensible, although I know they are under incredible pressure and their choices are far more limited than any other country on earth, with the exception of North Korea.

In either case, SOME of this will undoubtedly end up being a TOT, Russia willing or not. It will just be an expensive TOT cost, though. Iran learns from everything it purchases and will try to copy / reverse engieer. We'll see.

Good luck IRIAF.
Thanks for the insightful (as always) contribution. Just a little observation, when I spoke of the speculative nature of discussions, I meant Iran's overall approach to the air force, what it plans to do in future as well as the role of projects such as the Yasin trainer aircraft. But I do not doubt general Bagheri's word when he stated that orders for weapons were indeed placed with Russia after the lifting of the arms embargo, citing fighter jets, trainers and helicopters in particular. Moreover Moscow did not deny, so to me this is factual now despite all the follow up questions it raises.
 

Shawnee

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North Korea is not challenging the zionist regime ie the very top of the pyramid to the extent Iran is doing. No one but Iran dares, so there's no fear here.

If the top leader of Iran says that he aims to kill a US president and multiple of his staff, there is absolutely no fear component.

That is unheard of and unprecedented and ultimate provocation. No fear.
 

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