What's new

Iran, Turkey sign accords for Pakistan, China railway link

Piotr

FULL MEMBER
Jun 22, 2016
816
3
2,355
Country
Poland
Location
Poland
Iran, Turkey sign accords for Pakistan, China railway link
Tuesday, 19 January 2021 10:12 AM [ Last Update: Tuesday, 19 January 2021 11:13 AM ]

21ed3d08-1402-40a0-aee6-ec9a9e53118b.jpg

Turkish Railways (TCDD) Director General Ali Ihsan Uygun (R) and Railways of the Islamic Republic of Iran (RAI) Managing Director Saeed Rasouli exchange documents during a signing ceremony in Ankara, Jan. 18, 2021. (Photo by Rayhaber)


Iran and Turkey have signed three documents to expand transnational rail services linking them to Pakistan, Afghanistan and China, an official says.


Railways of the Islamic Republic of Iran (RAI) Managing Director Saeed Rasouli and his Turkish counterpart Ali Ihsan Uygun signed the documents in Ankara Monday to maximize freight and passenger transport.


“Both the rail route connecting China to southern Europe and Turkey-Afghanistan and Turkey-Pakistan rail links as well as the connection of Iran's southern ports to Turkey will be accelerated and operationalized by the signing of these documents,” Rasouli said.


He said the Istanbul-Tehran-Islamabad (ITI) transnational railroad is expected to enhance connectivity with China's Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) by providing a rail connection between China and Turkey.


Iran, Turkey and Pakistan are the founders of the Economic Cooperation Organization (ECO), currently a 10-member political and economic intergovernmental organization established in 1985.


The ITI railroad service, stretching for 6,540 km, will cut the 21-day journey between Pakistan and Turkey by sea to 10 days. And by extension, it will connect to China's Xinjiang autonomous region which is populated by ethnically Turkic Uighur Muslims.


The railroad would further boost BRI, a trillion-dollar plan to connect the infrastructure and economies of countries across Asia, Africa and Europe.


For Iran, the ITI railroad is an attractive alternative trade route because it can help move around US sanctions given that the ECO countries trade in local currencies.


The new railway connections will also offer greater flexibility going forward and stimulate the economies of the participating countries by streamlining their trade.


Observers see the ITI railroad as a BRI extension, while China regards Iranian transport infrastructure in particular and ECO's more generally as parts of the new Silk Road.


The 2,300-kilometer BRI is to link Urumqi in China’s resource-rich Xinjiang province to Tehran, connecting Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan along the way and extending to Europe via Turkey.


The ITI railroad is about to be the first regular rail service between China and Turkey, and an alternative to a more circuitous route via the Baku-Tbilisi-Kars railway.


Last month, a train reached Xi'an in China’s Shaanxi province northeast of Xinjiang after traveling from Turkey through Georgia, Azerbaijan, crossing the Caspian Sea by ferry, and Kazakhstan.


Several days later, reports said Iran, Turkey and Pakistan planned to revive the railway line connecting Istanbul to Tehran and Islamabad and ultimately extend it to China.

15022e1e-b259-4e40-b24a-f3b302b4d66e.jpg



The three countries launched a container train service in 2009, but it only got as far as test runs and was never fully operational.


Even so, they always planned to follow up the initial freight trains with passenger services and are now willing to launch the ITI transnational line with the aim of enhancing connectivity with the new Silk Road, Tokyo-based Nikkei Asia reported.


Iran-Afghanistan railway


Last month also saw Iran open a 200 km railway line, long touted as the sole viable option to build Afghanistan’s economy, connecting the Afghan city of Herat to Mashhad in Iran and on to Turkey.


The Khaf-Herat railway is hoped to open a new chapter in domestic freight and passenger transportation and reduce the cost of moving goods across the region to a fraction of that of highway transport.


The railway will stretch to Chabahar in southeast Iran, boosting landlocked Afghanistan’s trade and bringing in its mining sector from the cold to exploit billions of dollars in untapped mineral reserves.


A United States Geological Survey study has estimated potential value of Afghanistan’s mineral deposits as much as $1 trillion. However, Afghan officials have hinted at figures three times larger, citing new geological studies.


Minister of Roads and Urban Development Mohammad Eslami on Tuesday said Iran had proposed to extend the Khaf-Herat railway to Mazar-i-Sharif, Kabul and other cities.


"We hope the Khaf-Herat railway will be connected to Mazar-i-Sharif. However, we have explained to Afghanistan the conditions under which the project can be implemented with a strong organization and then extended to Kandahar, Kabul and the southern and eastern borders of Afghanistan," he told a group of railway trainees from Afghanistan in Tehran.


Afghanistan has almost no functioning railways, where there is less than 25 km of track in the entire country.


Iran has spent millions of dollars on development and reconstruction projects in Afghanistan. It has built dams and hundreds of kilometers of highway, and railroad over the last eight years, paving the ancient trade routes of the Silk Road.


"The progress of neighboring countries is interlinked with the development and progress of Iran," Eslami said.


"We have always been ready and willing to help and support the people of Afghanistan in order to ... show the world that nations sharing the same culture can put their countries on the path of development with their human wealth and God-given resources."


Afghanistan’s landlocked neighbors have also indicated an interest in linking with the Khaf-Herat railway line to send cargoes to and from Iran’s Persian Gulf ports.


Uzbekistan is reportedly interested in extending the railway line on its border with Afghanistan to Herat for a gateway to Iran. Tajikistan also wants to construct a railway through Afghanistan to Iran.


Iranian ports


Chabahar on the Gulf of Oman is linked with the International North-South Transportation Corridor (INSTC), a multi-modal network of ship, rail and road routes stretching from the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas in the Persian Gulf to the Caspian Sea in the north and on to Eurasia and Russia.


Iran offered a major lifeline to Qatar after the gas-rich country of 2.7 million people dependent on imports for most of its food needs was sanctioned by Saudi Arabia and its allies in June 2017.


Turkish trucks carrying milk, fruits, vegetables, grains and other food products drove from Mardin in Turkey to the Iranian port of Bushehr in the Persian Gulf where they were carried by ro-ro ships to the Qatari port of Ruwais.


The Iran route played a significant step in tackling the blockade as transportation time of less than two days allowed perishable goods to be transported without damage.

https://www.presstv.com/Detail/2021/01/19/643368/Iran-Turkey-railway-agreements-China-Silk-Road
 

khansaheeb

ELITE MEMBER
Dec 14, 2008
9,670
0
11,258
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom
The rail road seems to have stopped at Islamabad on the map shown, whilst the title mentions a train link between Turkey, Iran and Pakistan and China. The Pakistan -China train link is quite an engineering task and of an immense challenge. Only the Pakistan army and PLA can make it happen in one of the most dangerous mountainous regions in the world. The cost is huge for the China -Pakistan train link and will consume a large chunk of Pakistan's GPD.
 

maverick1977

SENIOR MEMBER
Feb 8, 2009
2,419
0
3,002
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
The rail road seems to have stopped at Islamabad on the map shown, whilst the title mentions a train link between Turkey, Iran and Pakistan and China. The Pakistan -China train link is quite an engineering task and of an immense challenge. Only the Pakistan army and PLA can make it happen in one of the most dangerous mountainous regions in the world. The cost is huge for the China -Pakistan train link and will consume a large chunk of Pakistan's GPD.
yes we have to create a gradient of 10 to 20degree climb and dig tunnels to go through the mountains.. Switzerland and italy are connected like that and will be done here as well..
 

Arian

ELITE MEMBER
Oct 21, 2011
2,403
0
4,648
Location
Germany
The rail road seems to have stopped at Islamabad on the map shown, whilst the title mentions a train link between Turkey, Iran and Pakistan and China. The Pakistan -China train link is quite an engineering task and of an immense challenge. Only the Pakistan army and PLA can make it happen in one of the most dangerous mountainous regions in the world. The cost is huge for the China -Pakistan train link and will consume a large chunk of Pakistan's GPD.
yes we have to create a gradient of 10 to 20degree climb and dig tunnels to go through the mountains.. Switzerland and italy are connected like that and will be done here as well..
I think Iran's railway network in the north that goes through the forests and mountains of the Caspian Sea and the Alborz range and then moves south is probably like that. The Germans built it during Pahlavi I before the World War II "efficiently" as they're famous for. It's not something that can't be achieved by today's standards if you hire good engineers and inject money into the project.
 
Last edited:

aziqbal

PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST
Aug 26, 2010
2,362
9
4,552
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
I just hope this materialises

it would be great for all involved

the 21st century belongs to the East

Turkey-Iran-Pakistan with the help of the economic juggernaut which is China

Add Malaysia + Indonesia to that also

however China should behave with the Muslims and especially the Uighur our religion is not for sale

otherwise we will do to China what we did to the Soviet Union
 

TNT

SENIOR MEMBER
Jun 2, 2019
3,793
-1
5,966
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Last month also saw Iran open a 200 km railway line, long touted as the sole viable option to build Afghanistan’s economy, connecting the Afghan city of Herat to Mashhad in Iran and on to Turkey
This should have been done by Pakistan. Afghanistan at some point will be rebuilding and we need to have the infrastructure to provide the materials. Our so called patriots who hate Afghanistan more than india should let go of hatred and think economy wise.
 

tower9

SENIOR MEMBER
Sep 19, 2018
2,745
1
4,308
Country
China
Location
United States
The rail road seems to have stopped at Islamabad on the map shown, whilst the title mentions a train link between Turkey, Iran and Pakistan and China. The Pakistan -China train link is quite an engineering task and of an immense challenge. Only the Pakistan army and PLA can make it happen in one of the most dangerous mountainous regions in the world. The cost is huge for the China -Pakistan train link and will consume a large chunk of Pakistan's GPD.
China has weathered many difficulties to build the massive infrastructure it has today. The railway can be done but it needs to be done ASAP otherwise this project loses momentum and credibility.
 

vi-va

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 23, 2019
4,822
-1
11,447
Country
China
Location
United States
Iran, Turkey sign accords for Pakistan, China railway link
Tuesday, 19 January 2021 10:12 AM [ Last Update: Tuesday, 19 January 2021 11:13 AM ]

View attachment 708457
Turkish Railways (TCDD) Director General Ali Ihsan Uygun (R) and Railways of the Islamic Republic of Iran (RAI) Managing Director Saeed Rasouli exchange documents during a signing ceremony in Ankara, Jan. 18, 2021. (Photo by Rayhaber)


Iran and Turkey have signed three documents to expand transnational rail services linking them to Pakistan, Afghanistan and China, an official says.


Railways of the Islamic Republic of Iran (RAI) Managing Director Saeed Rasouli and his Turkish counterpart Ali Ihsan Uygun signed the documents in Ankara Monday to maximize freight and passenger transport.


“Both the rail route connecting China to southern Europe and Turkey-Afghanistan and Turkey-Pakistan rail links as well as the connection of Iran's southern ports to Turkey will be accelerated and operationalized by the signing of these documents,” Rasouli said.


He said the Istanbul-Tehran-Islamabad (ITI) transnational railroad is expected to enhance connectivity with China's Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) by providing a rail connection between China and Turkey.


Iran, Turkey and Pakistan are the founders of the Economic Cooperation Organization (ECO), currently a 10-member political and economic intergovernmental organization established in 1985.


The ITI railroad service, stretching for 6,540 km, will cut the 21-day journey between Pakistan and Turkey by sea to 10 days. And by extension, it will connect to China's Xinjiang autonomous region which is populated by ethnically Turkic Uighur Muslims.


The railroad would further boost BRI, a trillion-dollar plan to connect the infrastructure and economies of countries across Asia, Africa and Europe.


For Iran, the ITI railroad is an attractive alternative trade route because it can help move around US sanctions given that the ECO countries trade in local currencies.


The new railway connections will also offer greater flexibility going forward and stimulate the economies of the participating countries by streamlining their trade.


Observers see the ITI railroad as a BRI extension, while China regards Iranian transport infrastructure in particular and ECO's more generally as parts of the new Silk Road.


The 2,300-kilometer BRI is to link Urumqi in China’s resource-rich Xinjiang province to Tehran, connecting Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan along the way and extending to Europe via Turkey.


The ITI railroad is about to be the first regular rail service between China and Turkey, and an alternative to a more circuitous route via the Baku-Tbilisi-Kars railway.


Last month, a train reached Xi'an in China’s Shaanxi province northeast of Xinjiang after traveling from Turkey through Georgia, Azerbaijan, crossing the Caspian Sea by ferry, and Kazakhstan.


Several days later, reports said Iran, Turkey and Pakistan planned to revive the railway line connecting Istanbul to Tehran and Islamabad and ultimately extend it to China.

View attachment 708458


The three countries launched a container train service in 2009, but it only got as far as test runs and was never fully operational.


Even so, they always planned to follow up the initial freight trains with passenger services and are now willing to launch the ITI transnational line with the aim of enhancing connectivity with the new Silk Road, Tokyo-based Nikkei Asia reported.


Iran-Afghanistan railway


Last month also saw Iran open a 200 km railway line, long touted as the sole viable option to build Afghanistan’s economy, connecting the Afghan city of Herat to Mashhad in Iran and on to Turkey.


The Khaf-Herat railway is hoped to open a new chapter in domestic freight and passenger transportation and reduce the cost of moving goods across the region to a fraction of that of highway transport.


The railway will stretch to Chabahar in southeast Iran, boosting landlocked Afghanistan’s trade and bringing in its mining sector from the cold to exploit billions of dollars in untapped mineral reserves.


A United States Geological Survey study has estimated potential value of Afghanistan’s mineral deposits as much as $1 trillion. However, Afghan officials have hinted at figures three times larger, citing new geological studies.


Minister of Roads and Urban Development Mohammad Eslami on Tuesday said Iran had proposed to extend the Khaf-Herat railway to Mazar-i-Sharif, Kabul and other cities.


"We hope the Khaf-Herat railway will be connected to Mazar-i-Sharif. However, we have explained to Afghanistan the conditions under which the project can be implemented with a strong organization and then extended to Kandahar, Kabul and the southern and eastern borders of Afghanistan," he told a group of railway trainees from Afghanistan in Tehran.


Afghanistan has almost no functioning railways, where there is less than 25 km of track in the entire country.


Iran has spent millions of dollars on development and reconstruction projects in Afghanistan. It has built dams and hundreds of kilometers of highway, and railroad over the last eight years, paving the ancient trade routes of the Silk Road.


"The progress of neighboring countries is interlinked with the development and progress of Iran," Eslami said.


"We have always been ready and willing to help and support the people of Afghanistan in order to ... show the world that nations sharing the same culture can put their countries on the path of development with their human wealth and God-given resources."


Afghanistan’s landlocked neighbors have also indicated an interest in linking with the Khaf-Herat railway line to send cargoes to and from Iran’s Persian Gulf ports.


Uzbekistan is reportedly interested in extending the railway line on its border with Afghanistan to Herat for a gateway to Iran. Tajikistan also wants to construct a railway through Afghanistan to Iran.


Iranian ports


Chabahar on the Gulf of Oman is linked with the International North-South Transportation Corridor (INSTC), a multi-modal network of ship, rail and road routes stretching from the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas in the Persian Gulf to the Caspian Sea in the north and on to Eurasia and Russia.


Iran offered a major lifeline to Qatar after the gas-rich country of 2.7 million people dependent on imports for most of its food needs was sanctioned by Saudi Arabia and its allies in June 2017.


Turkish trucks carrying milk, fruits, vegetables, grains and other food products drove from Mardin in Turkey to the Iranian port of Bushehr in the Persian Gulf where they were carried by ro-ro ships to the Qatari port of Ruwais.


The Iran route played a significant step in tackling the blockade as transportation time of less than two days allowed perishable goods to be transported without damage.

https://www.presstv.com/Detail/2021/01/19/643368/Iran-Turkey-railway-agreements-China-Silk-Road
This will revive silk road, bring a lot of opportunities, fortune to 4 countries along the road.
Pakistan will play a most important role. CPEC is the most reliable road, Pakistan is China best partner.
The rail road seems to have stopped at Islamabad on the map shown, whilst the title mentions a train link between Turkey, Iran and Pakistan and China. The Pakistan -China train link is quite an engineering task and of an immense challenge. Only the Pakistan army and PLA can make it happen in one of the most dangerous mountainous regions in the world. The cost is huge for the China -Pakistan train link and will consume a large chunk of Pakistan's GPD.
The rail road should be called railway on the heaven. It's so damn challenging.
But the benefit will be huge too. It will connect both countries, economically, politically, and militarily.

A railway can transfer 10 times more motor road, 100 times more than airplane.

Awesome.
 

Piotr

FULL MEMBER
Jun 22, 2016
816
3
2,355
Country
Poland
Location
Poland
This will revive silk road, bring a lot of opportunities, fortune to 4 countries along the road.
Pakistan will play a most important role. CPEC is the most reliable road, Pakistan is China best partner.

The rail road should be called railway on the heaven. It's so damn challenging.
But the benefit will be huge too. It will connect both countries, economically, politically, and militarily.

A railway can transfer 10 times more motor road, 100 times more than airplane.

Awesome.
That's right. It's more economic to transport things like petroleum products or coal using railway than road. But before connecting China and Pakistan directly by railway it may be good idea to create railway link from China via central Asia to Iran and then to Pakistan using existing railway infrastructure plus building missing links like railway from China to Uzbekistan via Kyrgistan. Another challenge is railway gauge difference, but variable gauge boggies can possibly solve this problem.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom