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INS Vikrant, India's First Indigenous Aircraft Carrier, To Be Handed Over To Indian Navy In May

HydraChess

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What is that thing? Do you know it or not?
I do know, but why should I tell you? Give me good reason for.

In this entire thread, you people --Pakistani and Chinese-- have been interviewing us about all sorts of things. I don't see I need to answer those questions anymore because I have already made my point well enough.

1. Bulbous bows are NOT mandatory for carrier design.
2. CVN-71 did not incorporate a bulbous bow.
3. Bulbous bow can be harmful to ship's pitching if speed of operation changes.

I don't feel any obligation of answer any more questions anymore than what is required.
 

GamoAccu

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Do you know what are the parts of a ship superstructure first? Can you name them? Lets get the basics in place.

What is this?

cvn.jpg
 

GamoAccu

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Not an authentic source. DLPA is a collection of publicly available library items. The title is wrong. The actual item is just a picture provided by national archives. I will take the word of a thesis from MIT over such a source.

If that site is wrong then please provide a source that describes that part of aircraft carrier.
 

HydraChess

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If that site is wrong then please provide a source that describes that part of aircraft carrier.
"That part" is called bow of the ship. And bow has many designs -- including bulbous bow.


Some interesting designs through history are covered here :

1651980061398.png


From the looks of it, this is a clipper bow or a blunted clipper bow.


Larger and newer U. S. ships are usually designed with characteristic blunted clipper bows, often difficult to distinguish from t he raked type common in lighter units.

For a bow to be called a bulbous bow, it should be designed to provide advantages of bulbous bow ie reduction of drag wave. Just because you see a protrusion, its wrong to infer that the ship has a bulbous bow. Check this out. Do you think this ship has a bulbous bow?

1651984005201.png
 
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GamoAccu

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"That part" is called bow of the ship. And bow has many designs -- including bulbous bow.


Some interesting designs through history are covered here :

View attachment 842017

From the looks of it, this is a clipper bow or a blunted clipper bow.




For a bow to be called a bulbous bow, it should be designed to provide advantages of bulbous bow ie reduction of drag wave. Just because you see a protrusion, its wrong to infer that the ship has a bulbous bow. Check this out. Do you think this ship has a bulbous bow?

View attachment 842028


"From the looks of it, this is a clipper bow or a blunted clipper bow."

Please show an acutal picture of an actual aircraft carrier and not cartoon drawing labeling that part. Show something like this.

cvn.jpg
 

HydraChess

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Please show an acutal picture of an actual aircraft carrier and not cartoon drawing labeling that part. Show something like this.

What are you getting at?

Get me an authentic source saying this is a bulbous bow not some random photo gallery with no source of who labelled it and under what expertise.
 

HydraChess

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And which one of these does this (CVN-68) matches with?

Remember, all of them have a BULB sticking out for the bow to be called bulbous bow. The design line of CVN-68 lacks that bulb. Also these drawings are in 2 dimension. The bulb is a 3-d shape.

1652037567489.png



For a comparison, here is Battleship Yamato which has a typical bulb associated with thick Faired-in Bulb and Ram bow. CVN-68 lacks that.
1652037934839.png


Here is another scale model to see how thick and swollen up the bulb needs to be.

1652038334858.png


CVN-68 Bow lack this thick bulb and is a V-shaped blunted clipper bow.

Need more evidence that Nimitz class before CVN-76 did not have bulbous bows? Read on...

Here is another document from US Navy Dock construction that calls out that last two ships (CVN-76 and CVN-77) had bulbous bows.

1652039690118.png


Here is a page from the technical report published by RAND corporation (https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/technical_reports/2007/RAND_TR480.pdf) which again identifies that CVN-76 and CVN-77 (unlike their predecessors) incorporated a bulbous bow design.

1652040142134.png


Need more evidence for me prove that CVN-68 did NOT have a bulbous bow? I can cite many more books and journals. Problem is most of them will not be available to you.

Eg. There is a book called Aircraft Carrier : History by Haskew which also covers various Nimitz class carriers and identifies which had what design feature. It also identifies this shift in bow design in Nimitz class.

If you are really interested in learning about how bulbous bow bulbs are designed and what their volume should be to be effective, I invite you to read https://www.amazon.ca/Practical-Ship-Design-D-G-M-Watson/dp/0080429998. Especially chapter 5 (Volume based ship design) and Chapter 8 (Design of lines) to understand how Hull and Bow is designed.
 
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