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India's Modi backs down on farm reforms in surprise victory for protesters

Taimoor Khan

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India's Modi backs down on farm reforms in surprise victory for protesters - World - DAWN.COM



India's Modi backs down on farm reforms in surprise victory for protesters
ReutersPublished November 19, 2021 - Updated about 5 hours ago


Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP
Farmers feed sweets to each other to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers feed sweets to each other to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP
Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP
Farmers feed sweets to each other to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers feed sweets to each other to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP
Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP





Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Friday he would repeal controversial farm laws that farmers have protested for more than a year, a significant climbdown for the combative leader.
The sudden concession on the three laws comes ahead of elections early next year in Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous state, and two other northern states with large rural populations.
“Today I have come to tell you, the whole country, that we have decided to withdraw all three agricultural laws,” Modi said in an address to the nation.
“In the parliament session starting later this month, we will complete the constitutional process to repeal these three agricultural laws.”



The legislation, introduced in September last year, was aimed at deregulating the sector, allowing farmers to sell produce to buyers beyond government-regulated wholesale markets, where growers are assured of a minimum price.
Read: From the hinterland to Hollywood — how Indian farmers galvanised a protest movement
Farmers, fearing the overhaul would cut the prices they get for their crops, staged nationwide protests that drew in activists and celebrities from outside India, including climate activist Greta Thunberg and US singer Rihanna.
Read: How one tweet from Rihanna on farmer protests got India incensed

Modi's capitulation leaves unresolved a complex system of farm subsidies and price supports that critics say the government cannot afford. It could also raise questions for investors about how economic policy is being overwhelmed by political interests.
Many of the biggest protests are centred around the capital New Delhi, where farmers have been camped by the roadside since last November, demanding the laws' repeal.
Rakesh Tikait, a farmers' group leader, said the protests were not being called off. “We will wait for parliament to repeal the laws,” he said on Twitter.

Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government said last year that there was no question of repealing the laws
. It attempted to break the impasse with farmer groups by offering to dilute the legislation, but protracted negotiations failed.

Violent turn
The protests took a violent turn on Jan 26, India's Republic Day, when thousands of farmers overwhelmed police and went on to storm the historic Red Fort in New Delhi after tearing down barricades and driving tractors through roadblocks.
One protester was killed and scores of farmers and policemen were injured.
Small farmers say the changes make them vulnerable to competition from big business and that they could eventually lose price support for staples such as wheat and rice.
The government says reform of the sector, which accounts for about 15 per cent of the $2.7 trillion economy, means new opportunities and better prices for farmers.
"The government failed to convince small groups of farmers of its intentions," Modi said in a speech after greeting the country on the birth anniversary of Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism.
Many of the protesting farmers are Sikh.
“We welcome the announcement made by the prime minister, but we need to know the government's stand on our other key demand of making (minimum support prices) compulsory for all crops,” said Darshan Pal, another farmers' leader.
Minimum support prices are state-set prices at which the government buys rice and wheat from farmers.
The expanded demand for minimum prices on all crops has gained traction among farmers from across the country, not just the northern grain belt.
Opposition parties congratulated the farmers.
Rahul Gandhi of the Congress, India's main opposition party, said their firm stand forced the “arrogant” government to concede.
“Whether it was fear of losing UP or finally facing up to conscience, the BJP govt rolls back farm laws. Just the beginning of many more victories for peoples voices.” Mahua Moitra, a lawmaker from the Trinamool Congress Party and one of Modi's staunchest critics, said on Twitter.










100 pyaz 100 Jootay. :D :D :omghaha::omghaha:
 

Battlion25

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This is spoky just as me and @Comrade bhartiya were talking about this 2 days ago..

By the way @Comrade bhartiya do you agree with my point of view now? Modi felt the pressure from the Punjabi ethbalishment deep state and this could have costed BJP the future he changed the law but regardless I don't think we will see BJP for another 20-25 years in Indian politics but they will be back after they lose the election but that will take 20-25 years it will be a more nastier BJP that will re-emerge an entirely different one but only after the Civil government takes control back to save India from Civil war
 

graphican

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Whoever was guiding Modi around farmer laws was as much lunatic as Prime Minister of India, Mr Modi himself. Infect Indian actions have alienated Sikhs and pushed liberation for Khalistan to the next level. Congratulations India!

Another stupid decision of this scale was abolishing Article 370 in Kashmir. Watch Modi collapse on that decision as well.
 

Wood

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sad day for the Indian people and India's development. stay stuck in license Raj era policies.
It is not good for India's economic future. But it was necessary for the Indian union.

Modi's BJP has failed to build a consensus with grass root elements who will be affected by the law. Underestimating the political determination of the Punjabi farming community has cost India dearly. I believe that a Congress gov. will be able to do better on this front in future. Everything has to change one day.
 

obj 705A

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Could some one tell me what is the name of this orange coloured sweets in the pic?
 

AgnosticIndian

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Everything has to change one day.
that is undeniable. but every day of delay is one lost opportunity, one more malnourished person, one more person stuck in poverty, and so on. they got rich off of the green revolution, often off the backs of Bihari laborer, and now deny the opportunity of another revolution to other people.
 

xeuss

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that is undeniable. but every day of delay is one lost opportunity, one more malnourished person, one more person stuck in poverty, and so on. they got rich off of the green revolution, often off the backs of Bihari laborer, and now deny the opportunity of another revolution to other people.
Everyone likes reforms, but in this case, the burden of the reforms were being unfairly borne by the farmers, for the benefit of private enterprise (read Adani) with little or no benefit for the consumers.

While most pundits view this climbdown as an election gimmick, if you look at the increase in food prices from when the laws were introduced to now, the perceived advantage for private enterprise no longer existed.
 

MH.Yang

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This is a mistake.
If a country wants to industrialize, it must carry out agricultural reform and transfer a large number of labor force from agriculture to industry.
Modi's agricultural reform is not wrong, he just lacks the courage to face the interference of vested interest groups and foreign political forces.
In the future, if Indian politicians want to reform, please ask yourself three questions first:
1. Do you dare to break the existing social structure of India?
2. Are you afraid of losing votes?
3. If your party loses its position as the ruling party, how can you ensure that your reform continues to be implemented?
Let me conclude by saying: if India's existing social system cannot be destroyed, all reforms will fail, no matter who becomes prime minister.


BTW: If there was no enclosure movement in Britain in the 15th century, Britain could not take the lead in industrialization.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enclosure
 

lonelyman

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India's Modi backs down on farm reforms in surprise victory for protesters - World - DAWN.COM



India's Modi backs down on farm reforms in surprise victory for protesters
ReutersPublished November 19, 2021 - Updated about 5 hours ago


Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP
Farmers feed sweets to each other to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers feed sweets to each other to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP
Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP
Farmers feed sweets to each other to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers feed sweets to each other to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP
Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP

Farmers distribute sweets to celebrate after India's Prime Minister announced to repeal three agricultural reform laws that sparked almost a year of massive protests by farmers around the country in Ghaziabad on November 19. — AFP





Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Friday he would repeal controversial farm laws that farmers have protested for more than a year, a significant climbdown for the combative leader.
The sudden concession on the three laws comes ahead of elections early next year in Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous state, and two other northern states with large rural populations.
“Today I have come to tell you, the whole country, that we have decided to withdraw all three agricultural laws,” Modi said in an address to the nation.
“In the parliament session starting later this month, we will complete the constitutional process to repeal these three agricultural laws.”



The legislation, introduced in September last year, was aimed at deregulating the sector, allowing farmers to sell produce to buyers beyond government-regulated wholesale markets, where growers are assured of a minimum price.
Read: From the hinterland to Hollywood — how Indian farmers galvanised a protest movement
Farmers, fearing the overhaul would cut the prices they get for their crops, staged nationwide protests that drew in activists and celebrities from outside India, including climate activist Greta Thunberg and US singer Rihanna.
Read: How one tweet from Rihanna on farmer protests got India incensed

Modi's capitulation leaves unresolved a complex system of farm subsidies and price supports that critics say the government cannot afford. It could also raise questions for investors about how economic policy is being overwhelmed by political interests.
Many of the biggest protests are centred around the capital New Delhi, where farmers have been camped by the roadside since last November, demanding the laws' repeal.
Rakesh Tikait, a farmers' group leader, said the protests were not being called off. “We will wait for parliament to repeal the laws,” he said on Twitter.

Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government said last year that there was no question of repealing the laws
. It attempted to break the impasse with farmer groups by offering to dilute the legislation, but protracted negotiations failed.

Violent turn
The protests took a violent turn on Jan 26, India's Republic Day, when thousands of farmers overwhelmed police and went on to storm the historic Red Fort in New Delhi after tearing down barricades and driving tractors through roadblocks.
One protester was killed and scores of farmers and policemen were injured.
Small farmers say the changes make them vulnerable to competition from big business and that they could eventually lose price support for staples such as wheat and rice.
The government says reform of the sector, which accounts for about 15 per cent of the $2.7 trillion economy, means new opportunities and better prices for farmers.
"The government failed to convince small groups of farmers of its intentions," Modi said in a speech after greeting the country on the birth anniversary of Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism.
Many of the protesting farmers are Sikh.
“We welcome the announcement made by the prime minister, but we need to know the government's stand on our other key demand of making (minimum support prices) compulsory for all crops,” said Darshan Pal, another farmers' leader.
Minimum support prices are state-set prices at which the government buys rice and wheat from farmers.
The expanded demand for minimum prices on all crops has gained traction among farmers from across the country, not just the northern grain belt.
Opposition parties congratulated the farmers.
Rahul Gandhi of the Congress, India's main opposition party, said their firm stand forced the “arrogant” government to concede.
“Whether it was fear of losing UP or finally facing up to conscience, the BJP govt rolls back farm laws. Just the beginning of many more victories for peoples voices.” Mahua Moitra, a lawmaker from the Trinamool Congress Party and one of Modi's staunchest critics, said on Twitter.










100 pyaz 100 Jootay. :D :D :omghaha::omghaha:
56 inch never buckle? :cheesy:
 

denel

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This is a mistake.
If a country wants to industrialize, it must carry out agricultural reform and transfer a large number of labor force from agriculture to industry.
Modi's agricultural reform is not wrong, he just lacks the courage to face the interference of vested interest groups and foreign political forces.
In the future, if Indian politicians want to reform, please ask yourself three questions first:
1. Do you dare to break the existing social structure of India?
2. Are you afraid of losing votes?
3. If your party loses its position as the ruling party, how can you ensure that your reform continues to be implemented?
Let me conclude by saying: if India's existing social system cannot be destroyed, all reforms will fail, no matter who becomes prime minister.


BTW: If there was no enclosure movement in Britain in the 15th century, Britain could not take the lead in industrialization.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enclosure
You were not even around to remember your own country's history; communal farms were a disaster - this was another attempt grab lands. Zhao Ziyang (bless him) was a great visionary; he allowed free market and that led to prosperity in the agriculture sector; now you want to move entire labour force from farming to sweatshops.

Do you even know the pride we farmers take in our work. I guess not.
 

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