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RISING SUN

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Full text of interview with Admiral Sunil Lanba, Chief of Naval Staff
Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Sunil Lanba spoke toThe Hindu on the sidelines of the first Goa Maritime Conclave, which saw participation of 10 ten Indian littoral states, on the developments in the region.

What is the outcome and take away from the two days of deliberations as part of GMC?
The most important outcome is everyone acknowledged the centrality and importance of the Indian Ocean as a key gateway to connect the East and the West and the dependence of the global economy on the sea lanes of communication. The key takeaways have been the coordination of efforts, we have identified common security threats across all countries and agreed on greater degree of coordination and information sharing to take things forward to provide maritime security and safety of the global commons of the Indian Ocean.

What are the common threats identified and how do you plan to take forward it forward?
Common security threats identified are non-traditional threats in the form of maritime terrorism, unregulated fishing, illegal fishing in the global commons, pollution, at sea piracy, drug and human trafficking. We have also agreed on need to put in place a coordination mechanism. We already have architectures available with several island nations, we have coordinated patrols with a number of countries who are participating here. We have identified ways on how we can exchange information.

Addressing the GMC, Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman talked of extra-regional navies making permanent presence in the Indian Ocean. What do you have to say on it?
When you look at geo-strategic situation in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR), what is happening on the ground is a fact of life. There is permanent presence of a large number of extra-regional navies in the IOR especially in the Northern Indian Ocean where at any given time there over 100 multilateral ships in the vicinity. We need to be cognizant of the fact that our presence in our areas of interest dove tail our deployment and surveillance missions so that we are aware what is happening.

When you say coordinated patrols, are we looking at more countries coming in? What about countries like US and Japan?
We only do coordinated patrols and joint patrols with nations who are our maritime neighbours and we have requested us in the IOR. We are already doing it with Indonesia, Myanmar and Thailand. We are doing Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) patrols for island nations of Maldives, Mauritius and Seychelles. We can look at increasing the frequency, increasing the assets which are deployed during the coordinated patrols. These are the avenues which are available.

We have been working with the US navy for a very long time. We have had the Malabar series of exercise and now we also have the Japanese Maritime Self Defence force joining it. That exercise will continue. We are not looking at joint patrols with the US Navy at this moment.

At the recent Navy Commanders Conference one key thing that came was increasing the footprint of the Indian navy under the Mission Based Deployment. What are you trying to achieve?
These are our areas of interest. We have had a permanent deployment of a ship in the Gulf of Aden for anti-piracy operations since October 2008. Last year we have relooked at our deployment pattern and we reached a consensus within the Navy to have mission based deployment so that our areas of interest can be kept under permanent surveillance. We started off by having a ship deployed permanently in Andaman Sea and approaches to the Malacca straits. Then we have mission based deployments in the North Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman and Persian Gulf. Similarly, in the Northern part of Bay of Bengal and we are enhancing our surveillance in the South part, near Sri Lanka. We are also sending ships to the Lombok and Sunda straits. So the ingress and egress routes of Indian Ocean region are being kept under surveillance so that we have better maritime domain awareness and know what is happening.

Is that the reason why we got to know that People’s Liberation Army Navy’s (PLAN) deployment in the Indian Ocean has been one of the highest this year.
They (PLAN) on an average for the last 2-3 years had about 8-10 ships which have been deployed in the Northern Indian Ocean. August this year was a unique month where there was a change around of the anti-piracy escort force. There was also a group of PLAN ships which were transiting IOR to Russia to exercise. This put together in the month of August the total PLAN ships spiked to 14. The present assessment, I don’t think they will go up further.

India has been undertaking capacity building of countries in IOR. How do you plan to increase it further?
We work in close liaison with island nations Maldives, Seychelles, Mauritius and Sri Lanka. We are assisting them in capacity and capability enhancements in the form of training to their personnel and other is proving assets in the form of ships and aircraft. We are working with them in coordinated patrols, keeping surveillance of EEZ on their request. That is what we are doing and will continue to do.

How far are we in countering Chinese presence in Djibouti and the Indian Ocean?
They have a base in Djibouti. There has been a change in the shareholding of Hambantota port. But Sri Lanka has assured that it is not an Operational Turn-around (OTR) port. It is a commercial hub and will be continued to be used for that. We will continue to work with likeminded nations and see how it proceeds.

How do you intend to do the information exchange with the littoral states?
Exchange of Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA), India has been perusing signing of technical agreements and sharing of white shipping information. We already have agreements in place with 12 countries and most of them have been operationalized. The ones we have signed recently, we are working out mechanisms on how to operationalize. Through these agreements information has already started to flow in. In both directions, us to them and them to us. This is being collated on our systems we have in place and there is greater awareness. The picture we generate is shared with our ships through our network centric operation centres. It is a more effective system now.
http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/int...anba-chief-of-naval-staff/article19982347.ece

Navy steps up patrolling of Indian Ocean Region
The Indian Navy is broadening its patrol areas in the Indian Ocean Region to cover all choke points in the face of increasing maritime threats, its chief Sunil Lanba told The Hindu.

“Last year, we had a relook at our deployment pattern and we reached a consensus within the Navy to have a mission-based deployment so that our areas of interest can be kept under permanent surveillance. So the ingress and egress routes of the Indian Ocean Region are being kept under surveillance so that we have better awareness and know what is happening,” Admiral Lanba said on the sidelines of the first Goa Maritime Conclave (GMC), which saw the participation of 10 Indian Ocean littoral states.

Under the mission-based deployment, 12 to 15 ships are now permanently deployed at the choke points and crucial sea lanes of communication.

Reference to China
Addressing the GMC, Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman had expressed concern that “extra-regional nations maintain near permanent presence” in the region, in an oblique reference to China. The Chinese have been sending ships to the northern Indian Ocean in the name of anti-piracy operations and over the last two to three years on average about 8-10 ships have been deployed. This August, the number shot up to 14.

Also Read


Full text of interview with Admiral Sunil Lanba, Chief of Naval Staff


Apart from getting access to several ports and facilities in the Indian Ocean, China recently opened its first overseas military base in Djibouti in the Horn of Africa, giving it the ability to monitor across the Gulf of Aden and the Persian Gulf. “Now”, former Navy Chief Admiral Arun Prakash told The Hindu, “it is imperative that our Navy should be more visible in our own waters.”

“Visibility is an important part of peacetime signalising,” he explained.

Vice Admiral Shekhar Sinha, former Western Naval Commander, said China, a huge importer of energy, has been trying to get past the Malacca dilemma, a critical choke point, from which most of its supplies pass through. He named three choke points for the Chinese — Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Hormuz and the Malacca straits — and added that they now have Djibouti at the Gulf of Aden and the Gwadar port and Chinese companies have acquired stakes in Kuantan port in Malaysia, close to the Malacca Straits. “Then all three choke points will be under the surveillance of the Chinese. That will slightly restrict the Indian Navy and the U.S. Navy,” he noted.

Speaking on the conclave, Admiral Lanba said the key takeaways were the identification of common security threats across all countries and a broader agreement for greater coordination and information sharing. The threats, essentially non-traditional in nature, include maritime terrorism, unregulated fishing, illegal fishing in the global commons, pollution, sea piracy, drug and human trafficking.

While India is looking at cooperative frameworks to deal with common threats, Adm. Lanba clarified that efforts like coordinated patrols and joint patrols will be done only with maritime neighbours. “We only do coordinated patrols and joint patrols with nations who are our maritime neighbours. We are not looking at joint patrols with the U.S. Navy at this moment,” he added.

Over the last year, the Navy, to test the waters, stepped up its presence and maintained round the clock surveillance on India’s vital areas of interest across the length and breadth of the Indian Ocean Region (IOR). This allows India to position itself as a net security provider in the region. “Earlier, there were flag showing missions in terms of overseas deployments for exercises and visits. The need of the hour is to change the nature of deployments. All choke points (meaning straits which connect seas or narrow water channels where ships and submarines of adversaries can be choked off) and sea lanes are now under 24/7 surveillance. They are now institutionalised deployments,” a senior Navy officer said.

The new mission-based deployment concept, which was unveiled in the Naval Commander’s Conference in May, has mission-ready ships and aircraft being deployed along critical sea lanes of communications and choke points from Malacca straits to the Persian Gulf. The biannual Naval Commander’s Conference, which recently reviewed its effectiveness, has formalised it.

The cycle of 12-15 ships in effect means a turnaround of 36-45 ships, with one set deployed, one set in transit, and one set in maintenance.

“These ships are deployed always ready to meet any eventuality across the spectrum of operations ranging from acts of maritime terrorism and piracy to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) missions,” the officer stated.

Adm. Arun Prakash said the new maritime strategy had listed “naval presence” as a mission. "This is, firstly, to reassure our friends that you are there, second to send a message to your adversaries and third, it is a measure of maritime domain awareness."

In this backdrop, he said Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea can be effectively monitored if India were to sit at the three choke points.

Another aspect is that India is positioning itself as the net security provider in the region and the first responder in the case of natural disasters.

For instance, in May, the Indian Navy was the first to respond to heavy rain and flooding in Sri Lanka as also to the requirements post Cyclone Mora in Bangladesh and Myanmar.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/nation...ng-of-indian-ocean-region/article19984925.ece
 

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China's role in Indian Ocean region: India discusses Maldives turmoil with US
China's aggressive play in the Indian Ocean region has prompted US and India to coordinate closely in Sri Lanka and Maldives — two countries strategically vital for India. This is a far cry from the years when India worked hard to keep the US out of South Asia, now US and India are working together to counter expanding Chinese influence.

Maldives is a matter of particular concern. China has consolidated its hold on the island, building infrastructure with its standard predatory pricing methods. Unlike in Sri Lanka where the Sirisena government is trying to fix its books, president Yameen in Maldives seems perfectly comfortable with growing amounts of debt to China. China's infrastructure push is natural given that China is possibly a world leader in land reclamation — its the add-ons that are of concern to India. China's financing mechanisms mean that China could be controlling large areas of Maldives fairly soon. There is a real concern about China's presence in iHavan project on Maldives' northernmost atoll, sitting in the middle of the busiest transit point between the Middle East and Southeast Asia — and very close to Lakshadweep islands.

Chinese submarines want to use the only viable channel in that region for their forays into south-central Indian Ocean — allowing them control over this channel would be against Indian interests, said sources.

In August, Yameen disregarded India's request to deny permission to three Chinese warships — as retaliation, India invited Mohamed Nasheed to Delhi, his first visit here since his exile. Yameen is playing his version of hard ball — Maldives repaid GMR's dues earlier this year, and India suspects China put up the amount, although when it comes to SOS on drinking water, Yameen dials New Delhi.

India and US are also teaming up to monitor returning ISIS fighters into Maldives — this country of 350000 has sent almost 400 ISIS fighters to Syria and Iraq (as comparison, Sweden with 10 million people is contending with 300 returnees). Given restrictive conditions and remote atolls, these radicalised 18-30 year-olds could spell disaster. "There has been an explosion of extremist preachers in Maldives," remarked a diplomat.

From a time when India persuaded the US to not bid for a monitoring station in Maldives for maritime surveillance for fear of attracting China, India and US have come a long way, largely because China has barrelled its way here, seriously impacting security concerns.

In Sri Lanka, Hambantota and Chinese presence there has spurred Washington's interest — so its not for nothing that the US aircraft carrier Nimitz visited Sri Lanka last week, without a murmur from India. Sources said, "Indian and US warships keep the oceans free."

India and US are trying to wean Sri Lanka away from the debt trap created by the Chinese — here Japan has played a big role as well, enjoying a huge cache of goodwill in the island. A diplomat familiar with developments said, "we have great complementarity and coordination between New Delhi, Washington, Tokyo and Colombo."

India's more robust presence in countries like Sri Lanka would have normally spooked the local population. But the US and Japan in the game makes it easier for these countries as well. This was alluded to by foreign secretary S. Jaishankar at a think tank last week.

The aim, said, sources here, is to transform Sri Lanka from a "consumer of net security to a contributor to net security in the Indian Ocean region." In fact, Sri Lanka is being prodded to use its influence with the Buddhist leadership in Myanmar on the Rohingya crisis.

India's policies in the Indian Ocean region are undergoing a sea change.
https://m.timesofindia.com/india/ch...ives-turmoil-with-us/articleshow/61514665.cms
 

Hindustani78

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Navika Sagar Parikrama - INSV Tarini Departs from Fremantle

The Indian Naval Sailing Vessel (INSV) Tarini left Fremantle, Australia this morning (05 Nov 17) for its onwards journey to Lyttleton, New Zealand. INSV Tarini had arrived at Fremantle on 23 October 2017 after completion of first leg of its maiden voyage to circumnavigate the globe. This historic circumnavigation attempt by an all-women crew is being led by Lieutenant Commander Vartika Joshi, and the crew comprises Lieutenant Commanders Pratibha Jamwal, P Swathi, and Lieutenants S Vijaya Devi, B Aishwarya and Payal Gupta.

The crew of INSV Tarini was officially welcomed to Western Australia (WA) by Tourism, Defence Issues and Citizenship and Multicultural Interests Minister Paul Papalia and Women's Interests Minister Simone McGurk on 1 November 2017. WA Ministers were accompanied by two Indian-origin members of WA Parliament, Mr Yaz Mubarakai and Mr Kevin Michel. Federal MPs from Western Australia, Madeleine King and Dr Anne Aly visited the vessel INSV Tarini.

Chief of Royal Australian Navy Vice Admiral Tim Barrett also visited the vessel on 1 November to welcome the crew. He also handed over a personal message from Australian Minister for Defence Ms. Marise Payne for the crew. The crew had several engagements during its stay in Fremantle, including call-on meetings with Governor of Western Australia, Hon. Kerry Sanderson AC and Deputy Mayor of City of Fremantle Cr Ingrid Waltham. President of WA Legislative Council Hon Kate Doust also hosted the crew at WA Parliament for an interaction with female MPs from all major parties.

The INSV Tarini crew had an opportunity to interact with a wide range of stakeholders during the welcome reception hosted by the Consulate on 28 October 2017, which was attended by about 100 distinguished guests, including members of WA Parliament, state officials, businessmen, academicians, consular corps, leaders from Indian community and media persons.

The crew of INSV Tarini also had an opportunity to interact with strategic thinkers and academia during a presentation and reception event hosted by Perth US-Asia Centre, leading think tank focusing on geopolitical issues based in the University of Western Australia, on 31 October 2017. More than 200 students attended a presentation and interaction session with the crew at Perth Modern School on 31 October 2017.

The crew also visited the scientific facilities at the Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre at University of Western Australia. They also had a chance to meet renowned Australian scientist & Australian of the Year 2017 Professor Alan Mackay-Sim, who is famous for his work on stem cell research. The crew also had a trip to few tourist places in Perth and Fremantle, including Rottnest Island.

The visit of INSV Tarini to Fremantle was covered widely in Australian print and electronic media, and ethnic media.

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Hindustani78

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Visit of Admiral Sunil Lanba, Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee and Chief of The Naval Staff to France

Admiral Sunil Lanba, Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee and Chief of the Naval Staff is visiting France on a bilateral visit from 05 to 10 November 2017. The visit aims to consolidate cooperation between the Armed Forces of both India and France and also to explore new avenues of defence cooperation.


During his visit, the Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee and Chief of the Naval Staff will hold bilateral discussions with Her Excellency Ms Florence Parly, Hon’ble Defence Minister of France, General Francois Lecointre, Chief of Defence Staff, Admiral Christophe Prazuck, Chief of French Navy, General Joel Barre, Director General Armament and Vice Admiral Hervede Bonnaventure, Director General International Relations and Strategy.


In-addition to holding important bilateral discussions, the Admiral will be visiting the Maritime Prefectures at Brest and Cherbourg, and be conducted around the Maritime Operations Centre. He will also visit the French Airbase at Landivisiau, where he will be briefed on the operational employability of the Rafale aircraft by the French Air Force, and also visit the French Submarine Facility at Cherbourg.


India and France have traditionally maintained close and friendly relations. The two countries established a Strategic Partnership in 1998, thereby significantly enhancing bilateral cooperation in strategic areas such as defence, nuclear energy and space. The Defence relationship between the two countries has been one of mutual trust and confidence. India has been importing critical defence technologies from France; the latest being the Rafale fighter aircraft for the Indian Air Forces and the Scorpene submarines for the Indian Navy.


The Indian Navy cooperates with the French Navy on many issues, which include operational interactions such as the VARUNA series of bilateral exercises, training exchanges, exchange of White Shipping Information and Subject Matter Experts in various fields through the medium of Staff Talks.Warships from Indian Navy have been regularly visiting ports at France, with IN ships Mumbai, Trishul and Aditya making port call at Toulon from 24 to 27 April 2017. The French Navy ship Auvergne, a FREMM Class Frigate, also visited the Indian Naval Base at Karwar from 02 to 06 October 2017.



The Indian Army and Air Force also maintain robust cooperation with the French Army and Air Force. The Indian Army conducts the biennial exercise SHAKTI with the French Army, whilst the Indian Air Force conducts the GARUDA series of exercises annually. Both the Services also carryout exchanges of Subject Matter Experts and pursue a structured cooperation mechanism through the medium of Staff Talks of their respective Services.





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U.S. Navy carrier drills with Japanese, Indian navy in Sea of Japan
The U.S. Navy carrier, the USS Ronald Reagan, conducted three days of drills with a Japanese destroyer and two Indian warships in the Sea of Japan, Japan’s navy said on Tuesday.
FILE PHOTO: The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan maneuvers along the waters east of the Korean Peninsula prior to a scheduled port visit in Busan, Republic of Korea in this October 21, 2017 handout photo. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class MacAdam Kane Weissman/U.S. Navy/Handout via REUTERS

The exercise involving five ships, which ended Monday, came amid heightened tension in the region over North Korea’s ballistic missile and nuclear tests and as U.S. President Donald Trump began a 12-day tour of Asia beginning in Japan on Sunday.

“The exercise helped improve fighting skills and deepened cooperation with India,” Japan’s Maritime Self Defence Force said in a press release.

The 100,000-ton Reagan, which is based in Japan carries around 70 combat aircraft and is the U.S. Navy’s most powerful warship in Asia.

The Reagan will join two other carriers in the Western Pacific, the USS Nimitz and USS Theodore Roosevelt, in a potent reminder to Pyongyang of the U.S. ability to rapidly mobilize military force, U.S. officials told Reuters earlier.
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-n...ndian-navy-in-sea-of-japan-idUSKBN1D70ED?il=0

All-women crew sailboat of Indian Navy leaves Australia
The all-women crew of the Indian Navy sailboat, which is on a challenging expedition of circumnavigating the globe, today left port city of Fremantle in Western Australia for its onward journey to New Zealand. The six crew of the Indian Naval Sailing Vessel (INSV) Tarini, led by Lieutenant Commander Vartika Joshi, started their maiden voyage on September 10 from Goa and is expected to complete it in about eight months. “The Indian Naval Sailing Vessel (INSV) Tarini left Fremantle, Australia this morning (05 Nov 17) for its onwards journey to Lyttleton, New Zealand,” Indian Navy Spokesperson Capt D K Sharma said. On October 23, the sailing vessel arrived at Fremantle Port, its first and only stopover in Australia, after completing the first leg of its maiden voyage to circumnavigate the globe. The crew was officially welcomed to Western Australia (WA) by Tourism, Defence Issues and Citizenship and Multicultural Interests Minister Paul Papalia and Women’s Interests Minister Simone McGurk on November 1.

Federal MPs from Western Australia, Madeleine King and Dr Anne Aly, visited the vessel. Chief of Royal Australian Navy Vice Admiral Tim Barrett also visited the vessel on November 1 to welcome the crew, Capt Sharma said. Vice Admiral Barrett handed over a personal message from Australian Minister for Defence Marise Payne for the crew. The crew had several engagements during its stay in Fremantle, including call-on meetings with Governor of Western Australia Kerry Sanderson AC and Deputy Mayor of City of Fremantle Cr Ingrid Waltham.

President of WA Legislative Council Kate Doust also hosted the crew at WA Parliament for an interaction with female MPs from all major parties. The crew of INSV Tarini also had an opportunity to interact with strategic thinkers and academia during a presentation and reception event hosted by Perth US-Asia Centre, a think-tank focusing on geopolitical issues. The crew also visited the scientific facilities at the Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre at University of Western Australia.

They had a chance to meet renowned Australian scientist and Australian of the Year 2017 Professor Alan Mackay-Sim, who is famous for his work on stem cell research. Their next stopovers are Lyttleton (New Zealand), Port Stanley (Falklands), and Cape Town (South Africa). INSV Tarini is a 55-foot sailing vessel, which has been built indigenously, and inducted in the Indian Navy earlier this year.
http://www.financialexpress.com/ind...lboat-of-indian-navy-leaves-australia/920416/
 

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LEMOA comes in force, US tanker refuels Indian Navy ship in the Sea of Japan; know what the memorandum is all about
The Sea of Japan, this week, witnessed a show of military cooperation between US and India, a US Navy tanker refuelled an Indian Navy ship. With the operationalisation of the Logistics Exchange Memorandum of Association (LEMOA) between the two countries, both the countries have got the access to each other’s facilities for supplies and repairs. INS Satpura, an Indian Navy stealth frigate, was refuelled by USNS John Ericsson, a US Navy tanker, as a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) activity carried out under the PASSEX (participation exercise). Besides INS Satpura, INS Kadmatt and a Japanese Maritime Self Defence Force vessel, J S Inazuma, also participated in the exercise, which was conducted from November 3-6 in the Sea of Japan. A source told The Indian Express, “The refuelling from a US Navy tanker extends the reach of the Indian Navy, allowing it to operate further, more persistently and for a longer duration. It is also a statement of intent about the India-US relationship.” It must be noted that this is the first time an Indian ship has been refuelled at sea by a US tanker.

The PASSEX, which was reportedly requested by the Indian Navy, arises when ships from two or more navies are operating in the same area and take the opportunity to train together. During the exercise, the two countries had first utilised the LEMOA to transfer fuel from INS Jyoti, an Indian Navy tanker, to two US Navy ships. As per the report, LEMOA was also used for accounting purposes during the training Exercise Yudh Abhyas in the US. India and the US signed LEMOA last August, however, it only operationalised earlier this year, once the two sides exchanged the annexures listing the point of contacts and the authority chain to be followed.

Meanwhile, India and the US are working closely to sign the Helicopter Operations on Ships Other than Aircraft Carriers (HOSTAC) agreement, which will allow the two navies to land and take off from ships of both.
http://www.financialexpress.com/ind...know-what-the-memorandum-is-all-about/928773/
 

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The Chairman Chiefs of Staff Committee & Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Sunil Lanba releasing the ‘Joint Training Doctrine Indian Armed Forces - 2017’, in New Delhi on November 14, 2017. The Chief of Army Staff, General Bipin Rawat, the Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal B.S. Dhanoa and the Chief of Integrated Defence Staff to the Chairman Chiefs of Staff Committee (CISC), Lt. Gen. Satish Dua are also seen.
 

Hindustani78

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Photos: Air display by Indian Navy for differently abled children in Mumbai
Nov 16, 2017 11:30 IST

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A large number of children visited the air station and utilised the opportunity to understand and appreciate the yeoman service being rendered by the Air Arm of the Indian Navy. The event was organised with a motive to create an environment to motivate the young minds while instilling a sense of patriotism and pride for their armed forces. (Pratik Chorge/ HT Photo)

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In continuation of Navy Week 2017 celebrations, a static display for differently abled children was organised for two days from November 13th to 15th at Indian Naval Ship (INS) Shikra, located at Colaba, Mumbai. A total of 481 students and teachers from Sankalp and other schools participated in the event which provided the visitors an opportunity to tour specialised aircraft and interact with pilots and crew. (Pratik Chorge/ HT Photo)

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Air show for differently abled children as a part of Navy Day celebrations at INS Shikra, Mumbai. INS Shikra is the only Indian Naval Air Station which is a heliport providing basing facilities and operational support to Naval and Coast Guard helicopters including all ship borne flights of the Western Naval Command. (Pratik Chorge/ HT Photo)

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The Navy Week 2017 which started on October 18, will continue till December 1 to provide a glimpse of various aspects of naval technology and life on-board to the public through a guided tour by officers and crew members of Indian Navy. (Pratik Chorge/ HT Photo)

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Differently abled children guided by officials take a tour of the N 477 Chetak at Indian Naval Ship (INS) Shikra, located at Colaba, Mumbai. (Pratik Chorge/ HT Photo)

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Indian Navy pilots seen at the airbase as part of a guided tour organised by the Navy in Colaba, Mumbai. The Indian Navy observes December 4 as Navy day to commemorate the successful missile attack on Karachi during the Indo-Pakistan war of 1971. (Pratik Chorge/ HT Photo)

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Physically abled children take a tour at the Indian Naval Ship (INS) Shikra, Mumbai through a guided tour by officers and crew members of Indian Navy. (Pratik Chorge/ HT Photo)

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Students participating in the event wave during the air show organised by Indian Navy in Mumbai. The children got the opportunity to learn about the different types of naval helicopters and witnessed routine flying operations from the heliport . (Pratik Chorge/ HT Photo)

8/8
A large number of children visited the air station and utilised the opportunity to understand and appreciate the yeoman service being rendered by the Air Arm of the Indian Navy. The event was organised with a motive to create an environment to motivate the young minds while instilling a sense of patriotism and pride for their armed forces. (Pratik Chorge/ HT Photo)
 

Hindustani78

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A seminar on ‘Cyber Security in the context of Indian Navy’ at New Delhi

A seminar on ‘Cyber Security in the Context of Indian Navy’ was held on 17 November 2017 at Dr. DS Kothari Auditorium, DRDO Bhawan, New Delhi by Directorate of Information Warfare, Integrated Headquarters Ministry of Defence (Navy). Over 350 personnel attended the seminar which included officers and sailors from various directorates of IHQ MoD (Navy), Naval units in Delhi area and other Naval stations, officers from sister Services, civilian dignitaries and professionals from cyber security industry. In the inaugural session, Vice Admiral SN Ghormade AVSM, NM, Director General Naval Operations welcomed the gathering and presented the theme of the seminar. The Chief Guest of the event, Admiral Sunil Lanba PVSM, AVSM, ADC, Chief of the Naval Staff delivered the keynote address. In his address, he shared his thoughts on cyber security and the challenges faced by the Indian Navy in the domain. He also enunciated the importance of responsible usage of social media and smart devices. A special address was also delivered by Dr. Gulshan Rai, National Cyber Security Coordinator.

The seminar saw distinguished speakers and practitioners from the Indian Navy sharing their perspectives on Cyber Systems related to Military viz. ‘Achieving Information Security for Military Embedded Systems’ and ‘Leveraging Cyber Operations for Information Superiority in the Network Centric Battlefield’. Speakers also deliberated upon issues such as ‘Cyber Security Challenges posed by Smart phones and IOT Devices’ and ‘Implications of Social Media on Operations Security’.

The seminar provided a platform for interaction and sharing of knowledge and experience in Cyber security among the experts in the field. The seminar was of immense benefit to all the participants especially those who are directly involved with the cyber security of their respective organisations.
 

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To bolster Africa ties, Indian navy sends ship to Tanzania
In an initiative to bolster bilateral relations with friendly foreign countries and navies in the Indian Ocean region, INS Sarvekshak, a hydrographic survey ship of Indian Navy's Southern Naval Command, arrived Dar-es-Salaam Tanzania on November 15 for undertaking joint Hydrographic Survey along with the Tanzanian Navy.

The joint survey will be conducted with the Naval personnel of Tanzania who have been trained in India in National Institute of Hydrography, Goa.

During the survey, training of Tanzanian Naval personnel will also be undertaken on advanced hydrographic equipment and practices. The ship will visit Dar-es-Salaam harbour in Tanzania during her stay for refuelling and replenishing stores and provisions.

Joint exercises with Tanzanian Navy are planned during the period of deployment.

The ship will be undertaking pioneer survey of Pemba Island which would include detailed surveys of Port of Wesha and Kiuyo and Pemba Channel in Tanzania and on completion will be proceeding to Port Louis in Mauritius in December for survey of Grand Port. In recent past, Indian Naval Hydrographic Ships Jamuna, Sutlej and Darshak have undertaken various hydrographic surveys of Dar-es-Salaam, Zanzibar, Makoni and Port Tanga in Tanzania. INS Sarvekshak has also undertaken various foreign cooperation surveys in the last few years in Sri Lanka, Mauritius, Seychelles and Kenya.
http://www.timesnownews.com/india/a...ies-indian-navy-sends-ship-to-tanzania/126995

Indian Navy signs deal with Tata for portable diver detection sonars
On 15 November, India’s Tata Power Strategic Engineering Division (SED) was awarded a contract for the supply of portable diver detection sonars (PDDSs) to the Indian Navy (IN), intended to enhance the service’s underwater surveillance capabilities and its ability to counter asymmetric threats.

The sonars, which are being acquired under the ‘Make and Buy (Indian)’ category of the Defence Procurement Procedure-2016 (DPP-2016), will be manufactured by Tata Power SED under a transfer of technology from Israel’s DSIT Solutions, according to India’s Press Information Bureau (PIB).

Senior IN officials told Jane’s that Tata Power will deliver approximately 50 PDDSs in the first lot, after which their numbers are expected to rise “substantially”.
http://www.janes.com/article/75747/...with-tata-for-portable-diver-detection-sonars
 

Hindustani78

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Navy Health Camp organised at Aurangabad (Distt Palwal) as part of Navy Week 2017 Celebrations

As a part of Navy Week celebrations, Indian Navy is conducting a free health camp for the general public from 18 to 20 November 2017 at Aurangabad, Palwal District, Haryana. Through this outreach programme, the Indian Navy aims to bring about awareness in the general public about the role and task of the Navy and also encourage youngsters to consider Navy as a career.

The Medical Camp was inaugurated by Admiral Sunil Lanba, PVSM, AVSM, ADC, Chief of the Naval Staff in an impressive function at Government Girls Senior Secondary School, Aurangabad on 18 November 2017. Surgeon Vice Admiral AA Pawar, VSM, PHS, Director General Medical Services (Navy) welcomed the dignitaries and the gathering. Smt. Anju Chaudhary, Addl DC, Palwal, Sh. Suresh Chahal SDM, Palwal & Sh. Hardeep Singh Sarpanch of the village were present at the function. Surgeon Commodore Shankar Narayan, VSM Principal Director Medical Services (HS) delivered the vote of thanks.

After the inaugural function, the Chief Guest Admiral Sunil Lanba, PVSM, AVSM, ADC visited the out-patient departments and interacted with the medical staff consisting of doctors, nursing officers and medical technicians. Subsequently, in an extremely well attended media interaction programme, Admiral Lanba interacted with the media personnel of both electronic and print media.

As a prelude to the camp, a mobile laboratory with facilities to carry out blood investigations was established at three villages, viz., Deeghot on 11 November 2017, Bamikhera on 12 November 2017 and at Aurangabad on 13 and 14 November 2017. Nearly 600 people were benefited by the mobile laboratory.

A medical team consisting of specialists, super-specialists and para-medical staff from the premier Naval Hospitals INHS Asvini at Mumbai and INHS Kalyani at Visakhapatnam has been instrumental in the conduct of the camp. The specialists will conduct out-patient consultation for medical, surgical, gynaecology, paediatric, eye, ENT, skin and cardiology ailments. The camp is supported by a dental chair for treating minor dental ailments and by laboratory, ultrasonography, echocardiography and pharmacy facilities. The camp also has facilities to screen for cancer cervix and cancer breast in women.




Adm. Sunil Lanba CNS at the Naval Health Camp Organised as a Navy Week 2017

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RISING SUN

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Force multiplier: Littoral mission
Naval frigate Taragiri, since decommissioned, was out at sea on patrol when the killer waves of the calamitous tsunami struck the Indian Ocean littoral countries in 2004. The Mumbai-based warship was signalled to set course for the Southern Naval Command in Kochi from where it stacked up relief and rehabilitation material and headed straight to Galle in Sri Lanka, which had witnessed widespread devastation.

In the next 14 days, the ship was able to construct shelters for some 1,200 people to live, provide medical aid to 2,500 people, create sanitation facilities, repair boats, clean water supply lines and some 800 wells that had been contaminated.

Simply put, the ship’s company won the hearts and minds of the people of Galle and the Sri Lankan administration. Such goodwill stays, recalls Commodore G. Prakash, who as a young commander skippered Taragiri at the time of the relief operation.

There were other nations, too, carrying out similar work, but the Indian naval team, with two engineering companies of the Army attached to it for undertaking civil reconstruction work, was head and shoulders above the rest. “The point is, we are trained and equipped for war, but actually do a gamut of things. Same with the Army and this is possible because of our doctrinal synergy, versatility and adaptability,” says Cmde Prakash, serving now as Commanding Officer of the naval base station INS Venduruthy.

Several roles

A blue water force with potent strike power and an instrument of diplomacy, the Navy also dons several other roles such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) work in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR), assistance to civil authorities and support to the Coast Guard in search and rescue operations. It also oversees coastal security operations, in which the Coast Guard is mandated to play the lead role. The Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief of the Southern Naval Command, Vice Admiral A.R. Karve right now, doubles up as Commander-in-Chief of Coastal Defence in the South — a system brought about in the wake of the 26/11 Mumbai attacks.

“It’s a brown water job that’s been assigned to the Navy, to strengthen other maritime agencies that are stakeholders in security and bring them up to a certain level of operational efficiency within the coastal security architecture,” an officer explains.

As for HADR operations, ships based at the Southern Naval Command fanned out to different parts of the world, to Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Indonesia et al to name a few, in the recent past with tonnes of relief material for assistance.

“It’s a standard procedure to equip every naval ship out at sea with HADR bricks in anticipation of call for help. Each of our ships is capable of taking on a variety of roles depending on the task at hand. The personnel are also trained to adapt and respond to a multitude of situations,” says Rear Admiral K. Swaminathan, Chief Staff Officer (Training) at the Southern Naval Command.

Training for students

Command Plans Officer Phani Kumar adds that the Navy recently gave a day-long training to members of the Students Rapid Response Force constituted in Kozhikode district for swift response to calamities.

Speedy assistance in times of emergency is something that both the Navy, as the net provider of security in the region, and the Coast Guard, as the prime responder to maritime rescue requirements, carry out as a matter of routine. “Coordination and cooperation with the State and district administrations is an ongoing process, and at various levels,” Cdr Kumar explains.

The Command Clearance Diving Team remains on call 24x7 for diving operations, as water-related exigencies are commonplace in Kerala. The Command provided diving assistance to the State administration 28 times since December, 2016, at the request of the district authorities of Ernakulam, Idukki, Alappuzha, Thiruvananthapuram and the Kerala Police. “The team gets down to work without delay, the only time taken is to choose the right gear for the particular contingency to be addressed,” says Rear Admiral Swaminathan.

Capacity building topping its agenda, the Command, in June this year, trained a batch of NCC cadets in scuba diving. It’s a formidable cooperation, given that a naval diving team remains stationed at the venue of the annual Nehru Trophy Boat Trace each year for rescue support.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/force-multiplier-littoral-mission/article20552646.ece

Indian Naval Vessel Reaches Tanzania for Joint Hydro-Graphic Survey
The Indian Navy’s INS Sarvekshak has arrived at Dar es Salaam and will carry out a joint hydro-graphic survey with the Tanzanian Navy. With this, the Indian Navy intends to strengthen cooperation with African nations and increase its sphere of influence in the Indian Ocean region.

“During the survey, training of Tanzanian personnel will also be undertaken on advanced hydro-graphic equipment and practices. The ship will visit Dar-es-Salaam harbor in Tanzania during the stay for re-fueling and replenishing stores and provisions,” the Indian Navy said in a statement.

“The ship will be undertaking a pioneer survey of Pemba Island which will include detailed surveys of Port of Wesha and Kiuyo and Pemba Channel in Tanzania and on the completion will be proceeding to Port Louis in Mauritius in December for a survey of the Grand Port,” the statement further read.

INS Sarvekshak is a specialized survey ship of the Indian Navy presently based at Kochi and is fitted with state-of-the-art survey equipment. In addition, the ship also carries an integral Cheetak helicopter, which will be extensively deployed during the survey.
https://sputniknews.com/military/201711181059215196-indian-vessel-reaches-tanzania/

Indian Navy Ships Satpura and Kadmatt in Thailand for IFR

Source - CAND
Indian Navy Ships Satpura and Kadmatt have entered Port Laem Chabang, Thailand on 17 November 2017 to participate in the International Fleet Review (IFR).


In pursuance of India’s Act East Policy and demonstration of India’s commitment to peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific Region, Indian Navy Ships Satpura and Kadmatt entered Port Laem Chabang, Thailand on 17 November 2017. While on the 5-day visit, both ships will represent India in the International Fleet Review (IFR) being organised at Pattaya Bay to commemorate the 50th anniversary of ASEAN. This year, India is celebrating the 25th anniversary of its partnership with ASEAN and 70 years of diplomatic relations with Thailand.

The Indian delegation is being led by Vice Admiral Karambir Singh, AVSM Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Naval Command. The Admiral will call on the Chief of the Royal Thai Navy (RTN), other high ranking government officials in Thailand and engage delegation leaders from several other countries during his stay in Thailand on behalf on Indian Navy.

The Royal Thai Navy is hosting the IFR, where-in over 40 warships from ASEAN and several partner nations are expected to participate. In addition to various operational and technological demonstrations/exhibitions, numerous cultural events are also scheduled in conjunction with the Fleet Review. These include an air race, a traditional Swan Boats King’s Cup and an International Navies City Parade at Pattaya Beach.

India shares special bonds of friendship with Thailand. This relationship is also reflected in the cooperation between the Indian Navy and its Thai counterpart. Both navies have regularly conducted Coordinated Patrols (CORPAT) in the Andaman Sea twice a year since 2005 and so far 23 CORPATs have been conducted.

India has also been at the forefront of all initiatives by the ASEAN comity, ever since its formation. India’s ‘Look East’ and ‘Act East’ policies have always complemented ASEAN’S endeavours. Ships of the Indian Navy are deployed every year to ASEAN countries and showcase India’s commitment to her partners. Bilateral exercises between Indian Navy and other navies of these countries enhance interoperability and forge shared perceptions.
https://www.yovizag.com/indian-navy...nter-thailand-ifr-international-fleet-review/
 

RISING SUN

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INAS 312 best naval air squadron


Commanding officers of all naval air squadrons attended the annual edition of the Naval Flight Safety Seminar hosted by the Southern Naval Command.

Vice Admiral A.R. Karve, Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief of the Command, inaugurated. He said it was fitting that the seminar was being held at the cradle of Indian naval aviation, which has now grown to be a force to reckon with.

The seminar discussed topics like the ‘Study of Best Practices of Civil and Advanced Foreign Military Aviation for Enhancing Flight Safety’ and ‘Imperatives of Airspace Management in a Rapidly Integrating and Dense Air Environment’.

A total of seven papers were presented on these themes. Various aviation accidents and incidents of the Indian Navy, Indian Air Force and Indian Army were discussed in detail as case studies.

Vice Admiral Karve awarded the Chief of Naval Staff (CNS) trophies for flight safety and the best naval air squadron to the commanding officers of the winning air squadrons. The Indian Naval Air Squadron (INAS) 312, the squadron operating P8-I aircraft based at Arakkonam, was adjudged the best air squadron of the Navy for the year 2016-17, while INAS 550 squadron based at Kochi operating the Dornier aircraft was adjudged the runners up. INAS 318, the Dornier aircraft operating squadron at Port Blair, was adjudged best frontline squadron in terms of flight safety.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Kochi/inas-312-best-naval-air-squadron/article20546964.ece

Indian Navy ship arrives in Tanzania for joint exercises, survey mission
India’s Navy says that the INS Sarkevshak has arrived in Dar es Salaam, where the ship and crew are part of a survey mission and will participate in joint exercises with the Tanzanian Navy.

The mission is part of India’s effort to strengthen its relationships with Indian Ocean nations, especially those in Africa as Narendra Modi’s government seeks more influence on the continent. The Indian ship in recent years also has conducted cooperative exercises with Kenya, Mauritius and Seychelles. Another trip to Port Louis in Mauritius is planned in December following the Sarkevshak’s current work.

In Tanzania, the ship will complete detailed surveys of Pemba Island, including the Port of Wesha and Kiuyo, and the Pemba Channel. Past hydrographic surveys have been done at Dar es Salaam, Zanzibar, Makoni and Port Tanga.

“The joint survey will be conducted with the naval personnel of Tanzania who have been trained in India in National Institute of Hydrography, Goa,” the Indian Navy said. “During the survey, training of Tanzanian naval personnel will also be undertaken on advanced hydrographic equipment and practices.”

The INS Sarvekshak is a specialized survey ship with state-of-the-art equipment that includes a deep sea multibeam echo sounder system, side scan sonars and a fully automated digital surveying and processing system. The ship also carries a Chetak helicopter used to conduct the surveys. It has a crew of 15 officers and 175 sailors, the Indian Navy said.
https://africatimes.com/2017/11/17/...-tanzania-for-joint-exercises-survey-mission/

Indian Navy ships take part in fleet review in Thailand
Bi-lateral ties between Thailand and India come to fore at the meet.

Indian Naval Ship Satpura anchored in Thailand as a part of the International Fleet Review on Friday. (Photo: DC)
Visakhapatnam: In pursuance of India’s Act East policy and demonstration of India’s commitment to peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific Region, Naval ships Satpura and Kadmatt entered Port Laem Chabang in Thailand on Friday. During the five-day visit, both ships will represent India in the International fleet review (IFR) being organised at Pattaya Bay to comemorate the 50th anniversary of ASEAN.

This year, India also celebrates the 25th anniversary of partnering ASEAN and 70 years of diplomatic relations with Thailand. The Indian delegation is being led by Vice Admiral Karambir Singh, Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Naval Command. The Admiral will call on the Chief of the Royal Thai Navy (RTN) and other high ranking government officials in Thailand and engage with leaders from other countries during his stay there.

The Royal Thai Navy is hosting the IFR, wherein over 40 warships from ASEAN and partner nations are expected to participate. In addition to various operational and technological demonstrations, numerous cultural events are also scheduled in conjunction with the fleet review. These include an air race, a traditional swan boats cup and a Navies city parade at Pattaya Beach.

India shares a special bond with Thailand and this is reflected in the cooperation between the two Navy’s. Both Navy’s have regularly conducted Coordinated Patrols (CORPAT) in the Andaman Sea twice a year since 2005 and so far, 23 CORPATs have been conducted. India has also been at the forefront of all initiatives by the ASEAN, since inception.

India’s ‘Look East’ and ‘Act East’ policies have been a perfect conjugate to ASEAN’S endeavours. Ships of the Indian Navy are deployed every year to ASEAN countries and symbolise India’s commitment to her partners. Bilateral exercises with these countries enhance interoperability and forge shared perceptions.
http://www.deccanchronicle.com/nati...ps-take-part-in-fleet-review-in-thailand.html

Four firms in race to build 6 highspeed landing craft for Indian Navy
Domestic shipyard companies are in the fray to build six highspeed landing craft (HSLC) for the Indian Navy, according to a report by The Economic Times. This will significantly enhance the country’s capability to land troops, tanks and armoured vehicles on enemy coasts.

According to the report, the Indian Navy had called for request for information (RFI) from interested parties to supply HSLC on September 22, to which Reliance Naval & Engineering, L&T shipyard, Goa Shipyard and Cochin Shipyard responded.

Sources aware of the development told the newspaper that the companies' responses with their technical capabilities, their design of the product and how they will execute the manufacturing.

The navy is in urgent need of HSLCs as they can be operated from landing platform docks (LPDs) or large amphibious warships. They can be used for amphibious operations that could be anchored 25-30 miles offshore.

The cost of acquiring these six craft is estimated at Rs 3,000 crore and they will be delivered by 2023.

The minimum requirement of the Indian Navy is that these HSLCs carry a minimum of 180 troops with a cargo of up to 65 tonnes, which will include tanks, armoured vehicles and equipment.

To provide protection to the navy personnel on the HSLC, the craft will be equipped with cameras for all-round view and will come with strong bulletproof and armoured plating to carry machine guns on both sides while transporting.
http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/tr...ed-landing-craft-for-indian-navy-2441373.html
 

RISING SUN

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Foursome break through the glass ceiling in Navy
As they emerged at the drill shed after the grand passing-out parade in which they marched shoulder to shoulder with their male counterparts in the Indian Naval Academy (INA) here, they could not hide their excitement at being the ‘firsts’ in the Indian Navy.

At the Admiral Ronald Lyndsdale Pereira drill shed, where all the 328 cadets of the Indian Navy and the Indian Coast Guard (ICG) and two international cadets gathered on Wednesday morning for the ‘Shipping of Stripes’ ceremony, these four young women in uniform hogged the limelight.

The ceremony, in which parents and guardians of the passing-out cadets shipped the Naval and ICG epaulettes on the shoulders of their wards, marks their transformation from cadets into full-fledged uniformed officers.

Shakthimaya S. from Thiruvananthapuram stood with Roopa A. from Puducherry and Aastha Sehgal from New Delhi. They are the first women officers to join the Naval Armaments Inspectorate (NAI). Subhangi Swaroop from Bareilly in Uttar Pradesh, another cadet to pass out, is going to be the first woman pilot in the Navy. Except Shakthimaya, these women cadets-turned-officers are daughters of officers in uniforms.

“We are proud of being the first women officers to be selected for the NAI,” said Ms. Sehgal after the ceremony. “We treat this ‘first’ as a great achievement for us,” Ms. Roopa chipped, with enthusiasm writ large on here face. Ms. Shakthimaya is no less thrilled. “Three of us have also been selected for the Republic Day Parade,” she said.

Ms. Swaroop, set to be the first woman pilot in the Navy, would soon be joining men flying Navy’s maritime patrol aircraft or combat platforms. That would be after training at the INS Garuda, Navy’s air station in Kochi.

“It is a challenge and I promise to live up to the expectations,” she said as her proud father Gyan Swaroop, a Commander of the Indian Navy, watched. “I am the happiest person now as my daughter is going to be the first woman pilot in the Navy,” he added.

A total of 328 cadets of the Navy and ICJ, including one cadet each from Tanzania and the Maldives, passed out of the INA on completion of their training. The passing-out Midshipmen and cadets belonged to four courses, names INA Course (B.Tech.), INA Course (M.Sc.), Naval Orientation Course-NOC (extended) and NOC (regular). The cadets included 20 female cadets from the Indian Navy. The parade was reviewed by Admiral Sunil Lanba, Chairman, Chiefs Staff Committee, and Chief of the Naval Staff.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/nation...comes-down-in-indian-navy/article20648611.ece

India extends deadline for naval UAV RFI
India’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) has extended its deadline to 21 November for overseas vendors to respond to its global request for information (RFI) for 50 naval shipborne unmanned aircraft systems (NSUASs) for the Indian Navy (IN).

First issued on 10 October the RFI states that the fixed-wing, catapult-launched NSUASs will be required to operate around the clock in low visibility conditions from ships and shore-based establishments to augment maritime domain awareness around an IN task force.

The systems' secondary roles will include reconnaissance and surveillance, target acquisition, and assistance in search-and-rescue missions as well as deployments in anti-piracy and anti-terrorist operations.
http://www.janes.com/article/75857/india-extends-deadline-for-naval-uav-rfi

Indian Navy to receive first of two submarine rescue systems in March 2018
The Indian Navy (IN) will receive the first of two submarine rescue systems (SRSs) from UK-based company JFD in March 2018, senior IN officials told Jane’s on 20 November.

The INR4 billion (USD62 million) deal for the supply of the two third-generation, 30-tonne SRSs was signed in mid-2015, and includes deep submergence and rescue vessels (DSRVs), launch and recovery systems (LARSs), as well as transfer-under-pressure (TUP) systems.

In a 17 November statement, JFD, which did not identify the IN as the recipient of the two SRSs, stated that the contract also includes all the support equipment and logistics required to operate the system in addition to a 25-year all-inclusive after-sales service support programme.
http://www.janes.com/article/75829/...of-two-submarine-rescue-systems-in-march-2018
 

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In a first, a woman has been inducted as a pilot in the Indian Navy and three other female cadets will create history by becoming the country’s first women officers at the Naval Armament Inspectorate (NAI) branch.

In a first, a woman has been inducted as a pilot in the Indian Navy. Shubhangi Swaroop, who hails from Uttar Pradesh, will soon be flying Maritime Reconnaissance aircraft.

Three other women cadets, Astha Segal from New Delhi, Roopa A from Puducherry and Sakthi Maya S from Kerala, also created history by becoming the country’s first women officers at the Naval Armament Inspectorate (NAI) branch of the Navy.

After their Naval Orientation course, all the four in their early 20s, had passed out of the Ezhimala Naval Academy at a glittering function in Kannur attended by Naval chief Admiral Sunil Lanba.


For Shubhangi, who is the daughter of a Naval commander, its a dream come true on being selected as a pilot. Though Shubhangi is the first Naval woman pilot, the Navy’s Aviation branch has had women officers operating as air traffic control officers and as observers in the aircraft who are responsible for communication and weapons, Southern Naval spokesperson Commander Sreedhar Warrier told PTI.

The NAI branch is responsible for auditing and assessing the state of weapons and ammunition of the Navy. All the four will be undergoing subsequent professional training in their respective chosen branches before being employed on duty, Commander Warrier said.

Shubhangi will be trained at the Air Force Academy at Hyderabad which trains pilots of the Army, Navy and the Air Force, he said.
 

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