What's new

Indian automobile exports reached 23.6 billion dollar in first half of 2021.

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
17,101
1
27,051
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
Majority of their exports are non-engineering goods.

Around 63 cars are sold in Bangladesh every day now – the highest in the country’s history
https://www.dhakatribune.com/business/2018/02/21/car-sales-triple-five-years

In 2019, car sales for Bangladesh was 3,000 units.
https://knoema.com/atlas/Bangladesh/topics/Transportation/Motor-Vehicle-Sales/Car-sales


Whereas, despite the raging pandemic and loss in income 2.8 million passenger vehicles were sold in India in 2020.
You and your Sanghi brothers would soil your pants if you had to afford a car in Bangladesh. Duty is 300 to 800%. Sometimes for reconditioned vehicles, the duty is 150% of the actual import price.

And what you consider a vehicle in India (two wheelers sometimes) is not considered a "car" in Bangladesh.

Third rate 700 cc tinpot pieces of crap "Made" in India (slapped together really) that cannot really be called "cars".

No Bangladeshi would be seen in, much less purchase an "Indian" vehicle. It is beneath any Bangladeshi.

Garbage all the way.
 
Last edited:

PradoTLC

SENIOR MEMBER
Mar 17, 2007
4,635
1
5,368
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Arab Emirates
Renault is not an Indian company

but made as per Indian standards
All 700 cc ugly Piece-o-$hit tinpots with no frame integrity in crashes. One side swipe by a truck and then car and driver are both much closer to Bhagwan....

But Rakhey Bhagwan, marega Kaun??

All of these score next to zero stars in European crash tests.

Some gems...

Maruti Suzuki Swift - 2 stars


Mahindra Scorpio - zero stars (note frame deformed like a tin can)


Renault Kwid - one star (total loss and damage ingress into passenger cabin, buckled floorpan)


Yeh hai mera Mahan Bharat-ka Kwality. Buy at risk of losing your own life....


You have to consider the Indian traffic environment…. The planners assumed you will be hit by a cow.


cleverly posting only the cars that performed badly. lol. how much inferiority complex one has to have to do that
Isn’t that what indian media does 247 …
 
Last edited:

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
17,101
1
27,051
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
If we use this metric then Mexico beats everybody, including China. Guess Mexico is now the automotive support power.

Yes that is true. But even twenty years ago, Mexico was a strong exporter of automobiles. Especially for Ford US and VW Germany which had plants.

Right now most US, Korean and Japanese Auto majors have assembly plants in Mexico for supply to North America and some to South America.

But that is the extent. Assembly from CKD and SKD kits - exported to the US, Thanks to NAFTA which enables workers to stay in Mexico rather than jump over to US. The US administration likes it that way.

The same as Indian "Darjee" (tailor) operations for foreign auto majors. Bringing in parts, assemble them together, use the low cost labor...
 
Last edited:

Sharma Ji

BANNED
Apr 15, 2020
1,680
-4
909
Country
India
Location
India
The same as Indian "Darjee" (tailor) operations for foreign auto majors. Bringing in parts, assemble them together, use the low cost labor...
They're doing a lot more than just putting completely and semi knocked down kits together in India.

What's a good Banglsdeshi car or bike you can recommend?
 

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
17,101
1
27,051
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
They're doing a lot more than just putting completely and semi knocked down kits together in India.

What's a good Banglsdeshi car or bike you can recommend?
Sharma Ji - we are not discussing Bangladeshi made automobiles here (which we have assembled since the 1960's and were a lot better than your Padminis and Amby's), unless you want to hijack the thread, which is against forum rules, right?

Also we are not a nation of 1.4 Billion which you should measure with other nations of that size. Like China, maybe?

Do you see the ignominy and fallacy of comparing your supposed gargantuan SUPA PAWA nation with ours (having an economy and population one-eighth the size)?
 

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
17,101
1
27,051
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
@jamahir bhai, look at this guys thought process. I love it. His analysis of unequal development is wonderful. Applies equally to Bangladesh leadership. :-)

The Myth of India as a Superpower


by IMTIAZ AKHTAR

The verdict of the world press is finally out: India, they say, is no longer a poor, despicable country as depicted by orientalist European cinema and novels but is now a superpower. To strengthen their argument, they show us India’s nuclear arsenal. If this does not suffice, they show us that the wealth of the 100 richest Indians has doubled or trebled. They go on recounting one after another feat to muster their points, including: the 2011 Cricket World Cup victory, India’s moon mission, the cellular industry’s phenomenal growth, the number of Indians who have won prizes in beauty pageants, and the growing popularity of Bollywood cinema in European countries.

Things could not get better these days, with everything, from plastic surgery to quantum physics, being “proven” to have been discovered somehow by Indians thousands of years ago, as the whole world slept. The case has been solved beyond the shadow of a reasonable doubt. India is the future. Unsurprisingly, those who cheer for this kind of India are the same westerners who view the non-western world as being their personal fiefdom.

A few months ago, I had the opportunity to attend one of my childhood friend’s marriage ceremony in the Northern part of Bengal’s splendidly dense forest. There, I met one of my former school teachers who suggested, for “my own benefit,” that I join the Nazi-inspired Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). He explained that, apart from the fact that I have all relevant degrees, I also have a Muslim name. This led me to withdraw into some deep labyrinthine cave inside me for a while, despite the hustle bustle of the wedding.

The conversation provided crucial clues into the minds of India’s superbly corrupt middle class, who have been hypnotized into believing that India could be powerful only through arms, displays of aggression, masochism and a poisonous breed of nationalism. Nitasha Kaul in her essay, Kashmir: A Place of Blood and Memory (In Until My Freedom Has Come: The New Intifada in Kashmir, Edited by Sanjay Kak, Haymarket Books, 2013) has this to say: “The large swathes of Indian middle classes are stuffed with intolerance, unthinking mass entertainment, and over consumption – fed by a corporatised media that ‘manufactures consent’ in a textbook Chomsky way. The mix of ignorance and blustery self-confidence that one encounters in middle-class Indians rivals Americans (they share this ‘superpower’ trait!).”

Average middle class Indians barely read, and when they do, to show how culturally advanced they are, they do not wander beyond the fictions of Chetan Bhagat or Sidney Sheldon. In cinema, they are die-hard fans of the horrible actor-cum-criminal Salman Khan, and in politics they have recently found out that if there is god on earth, then it is Modi.

Their detergents have worked hard to wash off the bloodstains from this man’s clothes.

The clamor of middle-class Indians for a life of super abundance is so deeply rooted that, as things stand, more and more they display the unmistakable characteristics of their former colonial masters. The middle class and the rich have become India’s new colonizers. Since colonization of economic resources is impossible without a simultaneous colonization of history and memory, India’s scholars, composed largely of liberal Brahmans, have embarked on an ambitious project to rewrite the history of the poor and dispossessed.

In this history of hunter and hunted, the hunters are always glorified: they become the unquestioned mediators of the universe. Their violence is normalized through the cultural apparatus, and any deviation from it is taken as a sign of unmanliness or even disloyalty. Today’s middle class has absorbed all the barbaric elements of the neoliberal world view, according to which, the huts of the poor must be cleared to make way for the shopping malls of the rich. The middle class never tires of repeating the word “development” as it refuses to ponder its meaning and implications.

The Brazilian philosopher Paulo Freire, in his lucid and easy-to-read book, Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1968), comments that It is not to become free men that they want agrarian reform, but in order to acquire land and thus become land owners–or, more precisely, boss over workers.” This is exactly what has happened in most post-colonial societies. After hundreds of years of struggle and sacrifice, countries in Asia, Africa, Central America and South America were able to turn the tide of colonization. The colonizers left, but they bequeathed to the rest of the world the imperialistic values and cultural praxis that have become so deeply rooted in our societies.

Most of the countries that had inherited a proud legacy of anti-imperialist struggle gave up their insistence on egalitarian societies. The newly-emerged ruling class with a history of colonization molded itself in the image of its colonial masters. The brown or black man had consciously or unconsciously internalized the traits of the white man. In the absence of the white man, the brown or black man became one: an object that inspires both fear and awe.

In India, the most violent upheaval started in the early 1990s. Since then, any remnant of a welfare state has been gradually withdrawn. India, for the first time in its independent history, had a Ministry for Disinvestment: a ministry created purely for the purpose of handing over public resources, created out of public funds, to private players. In short, India moved from proto-socialism to aggressive crony capitalism: a point publicly acknowledged even by former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

The net result of more than two decades of so-called economic reforms is there for everyone to see. India is on the brink of nuclear war with Pakistan over Kashmir; there is a massive rise of religious fanaticism, and the whole laboring class, which has suffered the most, leads a life of despair.
Go and visit any Indian city, and the mere sight will hurt the eye like a sore. These are our cities, where millions live chattel-like existences amidst stunning islands of prosperity. In the same city where a vast majority do not get access to drinking water, you’ll find families who own private jets.

Violence against religious and sexual minorities is a daily occurrence. The Indian economy is in good shape, but Indians are forced to live a hand-to-mouth existence. There is a growing sense of disillusionment among most Indians, and it is largely to counter this disappointment that right-wing political outfits today fan nationalism and the threats of terrorism and immigrants.

We collectively spend less to buy pencils for our children than to purchase arms. One could accurately say that middle-class Indians suffer deeply from an inferiority complex. It is to overcome this complex that they need to chant the mantras of superpower: its celebration, its symbolism, its dominant cultural values, its cinema, its novels, its songs, all of which affirm that deep down even they know that these are just a smoke-screen, a phantasy, a simulacrum created to calm their growing sense of unease. If reality cannot be altered, then it can at the least be forgotten, ignored or misrepresented through art.

Three days after the marriage was over, I met my teacher once again. I had arrived at my boarding school. In jails, military barracks and boarding schools, life is immune to change. It has its own sense of timelessness. Instead of myself, I found that young boys who resemble me deeply were, as usual, involved in the rituals of the boarding school. Once again my school teacher and I had an extended and quarrelsome discussion over almost everything: from India’s foreign policy to Leo Tolstoy’s aversion to the church.

One of those evenings, my teacher disclosed to me his deep-rooted desire to die. He looked into my eyes and said in a most melancholic tone, “I wish I could die quickly.” I was caught here. I tried hard not to look into his teary eyes. Here was a man who had taught me so much; I had learned from him that learning is the result of life-long and back breaking hard work. But men change. Time alters everything: from the blade of grass to diamond-hard convictions. If today, more and more middle class Indians get drunk and desire their death, the reasons are not hard to fathom.

Indians like my teacher champion a fascist model of development that exerts a disturbing influence on the inner self. The neoliberal world view builds up misery and guilt in those who theorize it or support it. It alienates the individual, firstly from his inner self and secondly from his fellow beings. These theories conveniently forget that there is a limit on natural resources. Forlorn and wasted, where else will such men seek their redemption if not in their own death. Fascism and its first cousin neoliberalism are harbingers of death and destruction.

If Indians do not heed history, India could end up meeting the same fate as Japan, which learned a lesson on humanity and sobriety after a barbaric nuclear war. In 1998, when India blasted its first successful nuclear bombs, the men in uniform ironically used the code phrase “Buddha is smiling” to indicate to their masters that the tests were successful. The way our internal crisis is brewing, the way India is conducting its business with Pakistan, soon Buddha might be laughing at us.

Imtiaz Akhtar has a law degree and is pursuing a master’s degree in comparative literature at Jadavpur University in Kolkata (Calcutta) India. He has worked as a journalist, as a lawyer and as an editor for a law journal. This piece first appeared at News Junkie Post.
 

Anik101

FULL MEMBER
Nov 15, 2018
613
1
843
Country
India
Location
India
And what you consider a vehicle in India (two wheelers sometimes) is not considered a "car" in Bangladesh.
17.5 million two-wheelers, 2.8 million cars, and ~570000 commercial vehicles were sold in India in 2020. Mahindra alone sells 3000 units of XUV300 every month and their overall monthly sales is way more than yearly automobile sale in Bangladesh.

You and your Sanghi brothers would soil your pants if you had to afford a car in Bangladesh. Duty is 300 to 800%. Sometimes for reconditioned vehicles, the duty is 150% of the actual import price.
35000 - 40000 luxury cars i.e Mercedes, BMW, and JlR are sold in India annually. Whereas only 3000-4000 cars are sold in Bangladesh out of which ~1000 are reconditioned vehicles. So much with higher per capita income...LOL :omghaha:
 

Robbie

BANNED
Apr 2, 2020
493
-32
560
Country
India
Location
Canada
17.5 million two-wheelers, 2.8 million cars, and ~570000 commercial vehicles were sold in India in 2020. Mahindra alone sells 3000 units of XUV300 every month and their overall monthly sales is way more than yearly automobile sale in Bangladesh.


35000 - 40000 luxury cars i.e Mercedes, BMW, and JlR are sold in India annually. Whereas only 3000-4000 cars are sold in Bangladesh out of which ~1000 are reconditioned vehicles. So much with higher per capita income...LOL :omghaha:
I know it feels odd to see a Bangladeshi commenting on industries. :lol: I've been to Dhaka. Less said the better about 'luxury' there.

This one in particular seems obsessive about India. But for what its worth, we should be happy to see Bangladesh doing better. It means fewer Bangladeshis will come to India illegally.
 

jamahir

ELITE MEMBER
Jul 9, 2014
21,630
17
19,514
Country
India
Location
India
@jamahir bhai, look at this guys thought process. I love it. His analysis of unequal development is wonderful. Applies equally to Bangladesh leadership. :-)
Wonderful write up. Describes especially the non-thinking, consumerist, neo-religious and fickle-minded minded middle class very well.

It is the middle class who are followers of all those pseudo-science-spouting babas, of those Tablighi Jamaatis who agitate in their IT companies for special prayer place and time instead of agitating for employee unions, of those who feed stray dogs without fail but are not moved by people who die of hunger. Etc etc.

This article was written in 2014. I wonder what the author would make of the middle class' thoughts when they suffered because of the second wave of COVID earlier this year.

Go and visit any Indian city, and the mere sight will hurt the eye like a sore. These are our cities, where millions live chattel-like existences amidst stunning islands of prosperity. In the same city where a vast majority do not get access to drinking water, you’ll find families who own private jets.
Nicely put.

Reminds of Mukesh Ambani's 27-storey "house" in Bombay, the same city which has Dharavi, one of the largest slums in the world.

We collectively spend less to buy pencils for our children than to purchase arms.
Truth ! India is the second-largest arms importer in the world.
 

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
17,101
1
27,051
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
Wonderful write up. Describes especially the non-thinking, consumerist, neo-religious and fickle-minded minded middle class very well.

It is the middle class who are followers of all those pseudo-science-spouting babas, of those Tablighi Jamaatis who agitate in their IT companies for special prayer place and time instead of agitating for employee unions, of those who feed stray dogs without fail but are not moved by people who die of hunger. Etc etc.

This article was written in 2014. I wonder what the author would make of the middle class' thoughts when they suffered because of the second wave of COVID earlier this year.



Nicely put.

Reminds of Mukesh Ambani's 27-storey "house" in Bombay, the same city which has Dharavi, one of the largest slums in the world.



Truth ! India is the second-largest arms importer in the world.
It is indeed sad @jamahir bhai when one thinks that the world's largest NGO is in Bangladesh when all logic suggests there should be more of a need for it in a large country like India where the needy teeming millions live, clamoring for opportunity, jobs and a decent livelihood.

BRAC and Grameen, the two largest Bangladeshi NGO's tried to help Indians by setting up operations, but they were viewed with suspicion and not allowed to operate freely by the Indian administration, some in India even hinted that there were ulterior motives like religious conversion. I'm sure the Jamaat and Hefazat in Bangladesh would disagree! :-)

Ultimately, India's poor and their lot is beholden to the moneyed interests in India.

The Goras have left but exploitation has not left India's poor. Poor and ultra-poor Indians have only changed exploiters, which are their own upper class and Banyas now.
 

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
17,101
1
27,051
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
I know it feels odd to see a Bangladeshi commenting on industries. :lol: I've been to Dhaka. Less said the better about 'luxury' there.

This one in particular seems obsessive about India. But for what its worth, we should be happy to see Bangladesh doing better. It means fewer Bangladeshis will come to India illegally.
With all due respect, what slum did you stay in? Went to Dhaka - right....that's where all the industries are. :omghaha:

Luxury doesn't exist in Dhaka? Only in Delhi and Mumbai? :lol:

Now I'm not the kind that will start posting pictures of AMG's, Hummers and Benteyga's and those of private eateries (invitation only). I'll let other Bangladeshis here do that.

Let the clueless stay clueless I guess...

Thanks for the laugh... :-)
 

mmr

FULL MEMBER
Oct 13, 2018
1,643
1
2,223
Country
Bangladesh
Location
Canada
It is indeed sad @jamahir bhai when one thinks that the world's largest NGO is in Bangladesh when all logic suggests there should be more of a need for it in a large country like India where the needy teeming millions live, clamoring for opportunity, jobs and a decent livelihood.

BRAC and Grameen, the two largest Bangladeshi NGO's tried to help Indians by setting up operations, but they were viewed with suspicion and not allowed to operate freely by the Indian administration, some in India even hinted that there were ulterior motives like religious conversion. I'm sure the Jamaat and Hefazat in Bangladesh would disagree! :-)

Ultimately, India's poor and their lot is beholden to the moneyed interests in India.

The Goras have left but exploitation has not left India's poor. Poor and ultra-poor Indians have only changed exploiters, which are their own upper class and Banyas now.
India wont able to pass middle income trap because they ignore grass root poverty...some Indian posted about agro exports and bragging about it yet they have one of the lower score on huger index....instead of feeding its own ppl trying to export more to buy expensive toys from daddy USA to counter China lol..

What can you say...leave them to be...Now poorer then LDC BD still I can see some Indian here whining about illegal immigration from there shit hole country which cant even pass 2k per capital after 75 years of independence...hilarious and shameless ppl.
 

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
17,101
1
27,051
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
35000 - 40000 luxury cars i.e Mercedes, BMW, and JlR are sold in India annually. Whereas only 3000-4000 cars are sold in Bangladesh out of which ~1000 are reconditioned vehicles. So much with higher per capita income...LOL :omghaha:
The very fact that you are comparing figures with an economy one eighth the size of India is pathetic.

Average new car in Bangladesh costs way over 25 lakh. Reconditioned you can't touch anything below 17 lakh. Kapische?

Now think what you can afford in India with that type of cash.

Also - luxury cars sold means India has unequal development, which no one can beat India in. :lol:

A few rich with hundreds of millions living in slum poverty.

Even then, there are luxury cars being sold in Bangladesh (even with 800% duty) that your shameless banyas can't even afford at that price. Indian Banyas are kanjoos compared to our moneyed class.

Inequality is nothing to be proud of, it means a country is on the road to being a failed state.

I remember back in the day some Indian industrialist came to Bangladesh and was boasting to my relatives that he had a Mitsubishi Pajero, we all had a belly laugh.

We assembled Mitsubishi Pajeros in Bangladesh since the 80's. :lol:

Morons and terminally clueless.

This is the place Indians have come to, comparing their SUPA PAWA country with Bangladesh. :lol:
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom