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Indian Army Soldiers qualify at range, exchanged tactics with U.S. Army Soldiers

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Indian Army Soldiers qualify at range, exchanged tactics with U.S. Army Soldiers











Soldiers from Apache Troop, 1st Squadron (Airborne), 40th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division coach Indian Army soldiers during small arms training at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, as part of the bilateral training exercise Yudh Abhyas 2010. U.S. Army Alaska soldiers assisted Indian soldiers Nov. 2 in qualifying with M-4 carbine rifles in preparation for exercise missions. (Photo by: Spc. Ashley M. Armstrong)


By Spc. Ashley M. Armstrong

JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska — Weapon proficiency is an important principle for soldiers, but it’s not often that one gets the opportunity to train with weapons used by a foreign army.

Soldiers of the Indian Army were given that chance during a small arms range here as part of the bilateral training exercise Yudh Abhyas 2010.

U.S. Army Alaska soldiers provided guidance and assistance to the Indian soldiers while they fired M-4 carbine rifles for zeroing and qualification.

“I love it. It’s something different, and something I’ve never been able to do,” said Sgt. Joshua Baugus, a scout with Alpha Troop, 1st Squadron (Airborne), 40th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, referring to training with the Indian soldiers. “It’s just awesome. We get to show them how we do things, and they are able to confide in us and trust us. We do the same with them.”

The majority of Indian soldiers qualified, he added.

“They understand the weapon and they did pretty well for never shooting an M-4 before,” said Sgt. Corey Tierney, another scout with Alpha Troop.

The range followed initial training on the weapons system Nov. 1, where the Indian soldiers learned about the M-4 carbine rifle and how to properly operate it.

“They just love this training, so they came out here ready to shoot,” Baugus said.

The training was also an opportunity for USARAK soldiers to learn from their Indian counterparts.

“We exchange different tactics,” Baugus said. “We have proven tactics and so do they, and from these training events we are all able to teach and to learn from each other.”

Yudh Abhyas is a regularly-scheduled bilateral, conventional-forces training exercise, sponsored by U.S. Army, Pacific and the Indian Army. The exercise is designed to promote cooperation between the two militaries to develop U.S. Army Pacific and USARAK relationships with India and promote interoperability through combined Military Decision Making Process, battle tracking and maneuvering forces, and exchange of tactics, techniques and procedures.

During the exercise, U.S. soldiers and their Indian counterparts will conduct a Command Post Exercise, airborne operations training, marksmanship and tactical training and take part in cultural exchanges to improve partnership readiness and cooperation between the armies of India and the United States.

DVIDS - News - Indian Army Soldiers qualify at range, exchanged tactics with U.S. Army Alaska Soldiers
 

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DVIDS - News - Indian, US soldiers share airborne techniques in preparation for combined jump


JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska — Soldiers of U.S. Army Alaska and the Indian Army combined a diversity of procedures, techniques and cultures to conduct basic airborne refresher training Nov. 2-3.

The training was held at one of the airborne sustainment training areas on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, in preparation for a combined jump Nov. 4.

Soldiers of 1st Squadron (Airborne), 40th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, trained and coached the Indian soldiers on U.S. Army airborne procedures during the training as part of the joint peacekeeping exercise Yudh Abhyas 2010.

“The purpose of this training was to build a bond and partnership so that we can work together and have trust in each other. It also allowed us to train and learn each other’s processes,” said Jumpmaster Staff Sgt. David Morgan, human resources sergeant, Headquarters and Headquarters Troop. “Because we are both airborne units from different armies, we pretty much have the same missions, though we do it a bit differently.”

The Indian soldiers were instructed on U.S. Army rigging and exiting procedures, proper jump form and the jumpmasters’ role.

“The biggest part is safety, even though they know how to jump already, just to be sure that they know how to jump with our methods so that we can have a successful jump,” added Morgan.

Indian Army soldiers did rehearsal jumps from a 34-foot zip-line tower to ensure their technique complied with U.S. Army procedures.

“Their airborne training mimics ours, but their exits are mostly rear exists so their technique is a little different,” said Jumpmaster Staff Sgt. Patrick Liddle, fire support sergeant, HHT. “Also, most of them have 30, 40, 50 jumps. One guy I talked to had 60 jumps.”

Training the soldiers proved to be simple because of the similarities in procedures and eagerness to learn, even though their jumping style differed, said Morgan.

“They were able to grasp the key thing ─ keeping their knees and feet together on their jumps ─ but we keep out legs out. They bring them in, in sort of a cannonball style,” said Spc. Sean Boivin, mortar-man, HHT. “It’s cool to see them jump because it’s nice to know that not everyone does the exact same thing.”

Soldiers from both countries wanted to get to know each other, take pictures, share stories and build partnerships that are part of the overall training mission of professional armies, said Morgan.

“This training shows that we support them and that we want to learn from them just as much as we would like to share knowledge with them. It’s a great foundation for a friendship,” said Boivin.

Yudh Abhyas is a regularly-scheduled bilateral, conventional-forces training exercise, sponsored by U.S. Army, Pacific and the Indian Army. The exercise is designed to promote cooperation between the two militaries to develop U.S. Army Pacific and USARAK relationships with India and promote interoperability through combined Military Decision Making Process, battle tracking and maneuvering forces, and exchange of tactics, techniques and procedures.

During the exercise, U.S. soldiers and their Indian counterparts will conduct a Command Post Exercise, airborne operations training, marksmanship and tactical training and take part in cultural exchanges to improve partnership readiness and cooperation between the armies of India and the United States

---------- Post added at 09:44 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:43 AM ----------

DVIDS - News - Indian-born U.S. Army Soldiers bridge culture gap during Yudh Abhyas 2010


JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska — Military operations between two nations can be challenging with the diversity of language, cultures and traditions.

U.S. Army Alaska found an untraditional method of alleviating those challenges when they discovered India-born sisters Cpl. Balreet Kaur and Spc. Jasleen Kaur, both medics for the 79th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (National Guard), who serve as cultural liaisons between the armies of India and the United States during exercise Yudh Abhyas 2010.

The 14-day exercise started Nov 1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, and serves as an opportunity to strengthen military cooperation between the two countries.

“This brings our two countries much closer together and anytime we have experts from the other country it brings us much further along. They understand their customs and courtesies, so they help us out tremendously and make sure that we do not violate any of the normal policies that they follow,” said U.S. Army Alaska Deputy Commander Col. Mark S. Lowe, acting exercise director.

The soldiers were specifically chosen for the exercise because of their background, knowledge and experience ─ providing a common ground between the two armies. The soldiers also serve as medics and are involved in role playing.

“Our commander knew that the Indian army and the U.S. Army were working together and he wanted something beyond just the exercise. He wanted the cultural aspect to mesh as well,” said Jasleen.

They also speak Hindi, which helps with communication during the training events.

“When we speak to them in Hindi they feel a little closer to home. Their faces light up to know that we can speak their language and that one barrier is down,” said Jasleen.

Jasleen and Balreet have provided guidance to USARAK on different accommodations that were necessary for the Indian soldiers to feel more comfortable in an unfamiliar environment.

“In India, we shower with buckets that we fill with tap water and we use a mug to scoop the water out, so they wanted to make sure that the Indian soldiers in the field had the right mugs,” said Balreet.

“They really have given 110 percent here. They have even offered Indian meals at the chow hall,” added Jasleen.

Initially, they were nervous about how the Indian Army would respond to them and were surprised with the attention they received.

“We are Indians representing the United States so I think that they feel more comfortable coming up to us because they can relate to us more and ask us questions about America,” added Balreet.

The sisters and their family left India in 2001 because of religious conflict in their home village and they haven’t returned since, so the experience during the exercise has been refreshing and educational for them, they said.

“With this experience, we actually get to learn more about where we came from and we get to learn about the Indian military. It’s been discussed many times how key this exercise is with the Indian army and the U.S. Army, so for us to be a part of that and to be exposed to this sort of setting is beneficial to us and, of course, to both parties,” said Balreet.

They have already learned many differences with rank structure, equipment and combat operations from conversations with the Indian soldiers, said Jasleen.

“Everyone knows those two young soldiers and they’ve been very helpful at the senior-officer level, the NCO-level and the soldier-level, so they have established great rapport with the Indian Army. If anything, it will bring our countries much closer,” said Lowe.

Yudh Abhyas is a regularly-scheduled bilateral, conventional-forces training exercise, sponsored by U.S. Army, Pacific and the Indian Army. The exercise is designed to promote cooperation between the two militaries to develop U.S. Army Pacific and USARAK relationships with India and promote interoperability through combined Military Decision Making Process, battle tracking and maneuvering forces, and exchange of tactics, techniques and procedures.

During the exercise, U.S. soldiers and their Indian counterparts will conduct a Command Post Exercise, airborne operations training, marksmanship and tactical training and take part in cultural exchanges to improve partnership readiness and cooperation between the armies of India and the United States.
 

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