What's new

Indian Air Force restructures $17 billion fighter jet program

monitor

ELITE MEMBER
Apr 24, 2007
8,141
6
11,196
Country
Bangladesh
Location
Bangladesh
NEW DELHI — The Indian Air Force is overhauling its plan to induct 114 medium-weight multirole fighters, with a senior service official saying the aircraft will be built in India with significant foreign technology transfer and no foreign procurement.

The effort will cost about $17 billion under the Make in India economic policy.

The Air Force official said the project is very much alive, but that the “final nitty-gritties have yet to be worked out, and that will take time because it will require manufacturing capability building in the country.”

Daljit Singh, a retired Indian Air Force air marshal and current defense analyst, agreed that India must move quickly to create the capability to manufacture high-tech systems at home.

“The main aim should be to extract the maximum [transfer of technology] from the OEM [original equipment manufacturer] and start manufacturing subcomponents through Indian companies," Singh said.

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman announced Saturday that the government will create a separate budget for domestic procurement of weapons and equipment to help reduce the imports bill.

A Ministry of Defence official said a formal budget allocation of about $17 billion for the multirole fighters project will be granted sometime next year, and will be launched under the Strategic Partners procurement policy.

Under that policy, the multirole fighters will be manufactured by domestic private defense companies with one of the original equipment manufacturers approved by the government. The process for selecting contractors is yet to begin, but the MoD official said the businesses will be selected within three years.

Sign up for our Early Bird Brief
Get the defense industry's most comprehensive news and information straight to your inbox
No private defense company in India has made fighter jets before, but several have expressed interest in participating in the program, including Tata Advanced Systems, Adani Defence, Reliance Defence, Mahindra Defence and Bharat Forge Limited.

Reliance Defence has created a joint venture with France’s Dassault Aviation, which currently manufactures components for Rafale fighters.

Meanwhile, Tata Advanced Systems has teamed with Lockheed Martin, an American company that produces the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Adani Defence has announced a teaming arrangement Sweden’s Saab AB, which makes the Gripen jet.

Another Indian Air Force official said a request for information was sent in June 2018 to foreign original equipment manufacturers for the multirole fighters. Among those who have responded to the RFI are: Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Dassault Aviation, Saab AB, Airbus Defence and Space, Russian Aircraft Corporation, and Sukhoi Company.

The Indian Air Force plans to induct all 114 multirole fighters within 12 years after the contract is awarded.

The official added that the RFI included the requirement for transfer of technology, including the transfer of design, development, manufacturing and repair expertise. It also included the requirement for the unilateral capability to integrate weapons, systems and sensors. The capability to upgrade the aircraft and a provision on exporting the aircraft is also part of the program. India is also seeking transfer of technology for stealth technology, active electronically scanned array radars, avionics, electronic warfare systems and engines.

“The advantage of making a fighter aircraft in India is that the customer can select the types of sensors, EW equipment, avionics and weapons, as per operational requirements. Subsequently, the customer is assured of full logistic and upgrade support without any restriction. However, it is important to embed most of these systems in the aircraft design itself to ensure low observability and systems compatibility,” he said.

However, Singh, the defense analyst, said any transfer of technology agreement would need to make business sense to the OEM. “Propriety Items could still be under the control of the OEM,” he said.
 
Last edited:

halupridol

SENIOR MEMBER
Nov 30, 2013
6,046
-32
6,917
Country
India
Location
India
Inki Nautanki khatam nahi honi.

Why do we need fighter jets,,,??
I don't think India has the gall, ball n brain for wars.
Neither do I think,, India has any military plans in near future. So why spend so much money.
Only explanation I can come up is having leverage on the competing jet makers n of course kickbacks
 

crankthatskunk

SENIOR MEMBER
May 20, 2011
3,811
3
7,449
Country
United Kingdom
Location
United Kingdom
What I see in this news is another "Indi Genius" lollipop given to the Indian public.

As they say acquire domestic capabilities/capacity. Which in other words means, buying every important component and get the assembly line installed in India by an outside source/company/companies.

They will pick up the "Baja" and start to allap the course of "Indi Genius". Voila.
 

The Maverick

BANNED
Jan 4, 2016
680
-8
462
Country
India
Location
Indonesia
This is embarrassing

Last week a defense minister said mmrca mark 2 is cancelled ie no money and that only tejas and 36 rafale would come next 10 years.

Then the airchief of indian air force said we will acquire both tejas and mmrca

So what goes here
 

Indos

PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST
Jul 25, 2013
8,297
19
12,558
Country
Indonesia
Location
Indonesia
This is embarrassing

Last week a defense minister said mmrca mark 2 is cancelled ie no money and that only tejas and 36 rafale would come next 10 years.

Then the airchief of indian air force said we will acquire both tejas and mmrca

So what goes here
Do you mean MMRCA program is Tejas Mark 2 ?
 

Secular

FULL MEMBER

New Recruit

Apr 17, 2020
83
0
52
Country
India
Location
India
Paf is definitely 2 two steps ahead of Iaf.
Our iaf babu are busy in planning only.
First time i heard about mmrca in 2012 and this circus still continue.
Just embarrassing..
 

My-Analogous

SENIOR MEMBER
Feb 9, 2009
6,739
2
5,195
Country
Pakistan
Location
Saudi Arabia
NEW DELHI — The Indian Air Force is overhauling its plan to induct 114 medium-weight multirole fighters, with a senior service official saying the aircraft will be built in India with significant foreign technology transfer and no foreign procurement.

The effort will cost about $17 billion under the Make in India economic policy.

The Air Force official said the project is very much alive, but that the “final nitty-gritties have yet to be worked out, and that will take time because it will require manufacturing capability building in the country.”

Daljit Singh, a retired Indian Air Force air marshal and current defense analyst, agreed that India must move quickly to create the capability to manufacture high-tech systems at home.

“The main aim should be to extract the maximum [transfer of technology] from the OEM [original equipment manufacturer] and start manufacturing subcomponents through Indian companies," Singh said.

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman announced Saturday that the government will create a separate budget for domestic procurement of weapons and equipment to help reduce the imports bill.

A Ministry of Defence official said a formal budget allocation of about $17 billion for the multirole fighters project will be granted sometime next year, and will be launched under the Strategic Partners procurement policy.

Under that policy, the multirole fighters will be manufactured by domestic private defense companies with one of the original equipment manufacturers approved by the government. The process for selecting contractors is yet to begin, but the MoD official said the businesses will be selected within three years.

Sign up for our Early Bird Brief
Get the defense industry's most comprehensive news and information straight to your inbox
No private defense company in India has made fighter jets before, but several have expressed interest in participating in the program, including Tata Advanced Systems, Adani Defence, Reliance Defence, Mahindra Defence and Bharat Forge Limited.

Reliance Defence has created a joint venture with France’s Dassault Aviation, which currently manufactures components for Rafale fighters.

Meanwhile, Tata Advanced Systems has teamed with Lockheed Martin, an American company that produces the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Adani Defence has announced a teaming arrangement Sweden’s Saab AB, which makes the Gripen jet.

Another Indian Air Force official said a request for information was sent in June 2018 to foreign original equipment manufacturers for the multirole fighters. Among those who have responded to the RFI are: Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Dassault Aviation, Saab AB, Airbus Defence and Space, Russian Aircraft Corporation, and Sukhoi Company.

The Indian Air Force plans to induct all 114 multirole fighters within 12 years after the contract is awarded.

The official added that the RFI included the requirement for transfer of technology, including the transfer of design, development, manufacturing and repair expertise. It also included the requirement for the unilateral capability to integrate weapons, systems and sensors. The capability to upgrade the aircraft and a provision on exporting the aircraft is also part of the program. India is also seeking transfer of technology for stealth technology, active electronically scanned array radars, avionics, electronic warfare systems and engines.

“The advantage of making a fighter aircraft in India is that the customer can select the types of sensors, EW equipment, avionics and weapons, as per operational requirements. Subsequently, the customer is assured of full logistic and upgrade support without any restriction. However, it is important to embed most of these systems in the aircraft design itself to ensure low observability and systems compatibility,” he said.

However, Singh, the defense analyst, said any transfer of technology agreement would need to make business sense to the OEM. “Propriety Items could still be under the control of the OEM,” he said.
fail project. No one sell technology for few billion. India need at least 100 billion to get that
 

Juggernaut_Flat_Plane_V8

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 19, 2017
2,183
-4
2,365
Country
India
Location
Germany
The only Fighter Jet manufacturer you can strong arm a bit to extract that level Transfer-of-Technology is Saab and no one else..Indian babus are too much into planning, day dreaming, building castles in the air...
 

Imran Khan

PDF VETERAN
Oct 18, 2007
55,646
-1
107,567
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
keep doing it please we are with you and your plans :lol:

Paf is definitely 2 two steps ahead of Iaf.
Our iaf babu are busy in planning only.
First time i heard about mmrca in 2012 and this circus still continue.
Just embarrassing..
ohhh bhai where was you from 2001 to 2012 ??????? The IAF projected a requirement for about 126 aircraft in 2001.Requests for Information (RFI) were issued in 2004.The economic offset for the MMRCA tender was increased to 50% under the DPP 2006.On 28 August 2007, the RFP was released to the 6 bidding companies..On 24 April 2008, Boeing submitted its 7,000-page proposal to the Ministry of Defence.On 17 January 2008, Lockheed Martin offered a customized version of the F-16 .Air Marshal S.P. Tyagi stated during Aero India 2007 that the number would remain the same.The F/A-18E/F and F-16IN completed their field trials by mid-September 2009.It was reported in April 2009 that Dassault Aviation's Rafale has been rejected after technical evaluation of the fighters.The IAF was to complete an evaluation report on the six fighters in July 2010.It is reasonable to expect that the aircraft can be delivered no sooner than 2011.On 31 January 2012, it was announced that the Dassault Rafale won the competition and has been selected for exclusive negotiations.The Indian Air Force expected to complete negotiations and sign the contract by the end of the fiscal year, in March 2013.By 14 July 2014, it was reported another meeting of a sub-committee of the contract negotiation committee had been scheduled for later that week in Bangalore, with MoD, Air Force, Dassault, DRDO and HAL representatives to be in attendance.
In January 2014, the cost of the aircraft had reportedly escalated by 100% to no less than US$28–30 billion. The cost of the program was projected at US$12 billion (Rs42,000 crore) in 2007. The cost increased to US$18 billion (Rs90,000 crore) in January 2012 when the lowest bidder was declared.
negotiations had once again stalled by October 2014, due to disputes over final costs and technology transfers.
n 5 November 2014, Dassault Aviation CEO Eric Trappier said he expected the final contract would be signed by March 2015.
Fate of the deal
On 31 July 2015, Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar stated in Rajya Sabha that the deal for 126 MMRCA was officially withdrawn by the government.


On 23 September 2016, Indian Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar and his French counterpart Jean-Yves Le Drian signed the contract for the purchase of 36 off-the-shelf Rafales in a deal worth €7.8 billion with an option for 18 more at the same inflation-adjusted price. The deliveries were to begin in 2019 and complete by 2022.The deal includes weapons and spares; the aircraft will be equipped with Meteor BVRAAM missiles.Indian Air Force inducted the first Rafale in October 2019.
 
Last edited:

khanmubashir

FULL MEMBER
Aug 13, 2014
1,548
0
1,299
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
The only Fighter Jet manufacturer you can strong arm a bit to extract that level Transfer-of-Technology is Saab and no one else..Indian babus are too much into planning, day dreaming, building castles in the air...
If u want mass orders for subsystems maintenance services from global market

Go for f16s but political strings and IP restrictions will be attached


If want tot to the level.of.developing own jets then Saab

But alot of its systems r sourced from other western nations


These r the only two economical options in 17 billion$ for 114 jets


Rest is bs for public consumption
 

American Pakistani

ELITE MEMBER
May 30, 2010
14,547
10
21,018
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Ho
Inki Nautanki khatam nahi honi.

Why do we need fighter jets,,,??
I don't think India has the gall, ball n brain for wars.
Neither do I think,, India has any military plans in near future. So why spend so much money.
Only explanation I can come up is having leverage on the competing jet makers n of course kickbacks
How will they get their chance of getting a nice retirement life then?
 

Imran Khan

PDF VETERAN
Oct 18, 2007
55,646
-1
107,567
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
If u want mass orders for subsystems maintenance services from global market

Go for f16s but political strings and IP restrictions will be attached


If want tot to the level.of.developing own jets then Saab

But alot of its systems r sourced from other western nations


These r the only two economical options in 17 billion$ for 114 jets


Rest is bs for public consumption
i dont think that 114 numbers can be got with 17bn$ any of MMRCA fighter now sir 20+bn is cost for 114 jets now .
 

Imran Khan

PDF VETERAN
Oct 18, 2007
55,646
-1
107,567
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Well then close to it but no way u can get 100+ twin engine jets that too with tot local assembly etc all within 17-20 billions $
they will never buy them all that drama was just fake . its busted no company will waste millions now for indian jokes . they will jest send teams and papers now . infact all of the companies are tired and sick . only rafale got a chunk of 36 jets orders which is normal order not something mother of all defense deals .
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)

Top