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India Is Selling Supersonic BrahMos Missiles To China’s Enemies

MH.Yang

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There's no China enemies in Asia pacific ,they are all relatives with some intra familiar tussle, only delusional indian think China & SEA nations' relationship is that of an enemy,and SEA views china as butthurt lNDIANS.
The development and economy of SEA is tried to the rise of China,as we type, chinese funds and engineers are building SEA to form an independent sphere from western influence.India 80's outdated soviet missile has no space to ruin that. For every Indian initiative, China can respond in an overwhelming manner,if India thinks they can arm their conceived Chinese enemies with Supersonic, china can arm Indian's enemies with hypersonic,nepal-SL-PAK even BD.


Duterte is retiring ,but the gov is at loggerhead with CIA controlled military.China needs the military to military contact with PH,may be through MSS collaboration with the next pres of PH.

There's no need to do that.
Duterte has a very high reputation among Filipinos. Duterte's daughter is more than twice as popular as her competitors. Moreover, during duterte's term of office, the Philippine economy was deeply bound with the Chinese economy, and a large number of Philippine elites were vested interests in the trade between China and the Philippines.
There is no need for China to intervene in the Philippine election, which will give the opposition an excuse. On the contrary, we should patiently wait for the Americans to intervene in the Philippine election, and then seize this black hand.
 

Globenim

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I like how they use plural on enemies in the title, when the amount of countries that India is assembling Russian weapons for stands at exactly 1 and 0 of that are enemies
 

Leishangthem

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There's no need to do that.
Duterte has a very high reputation among Filipinos. Duterte's daughter is more than twice as popular as her competitors. Moreover, during duterte's term of office, the Philippine economy was deeply bound with the Chinese economy, and a large number of Philippine elites were vested interests in the trade between China and the Philippines.
There is no need for China to intervene in the Philippine election, which will give the opposition an excuse. On the contrary, we should patiently wait for the Americans to intervene in the Philippine election, and then seize this black hand.
I'm not encouraging election meddling at all ,but intelligence lvl contact to help the ph admin deal with CIA influence on their own and help them achieve political autonomy from US meddling.Every Anti china action at state lvl involves cia.
 

MH.Yang

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I'm not encouraging election meddling at all ,but intelligence lvl contact to help the ph admin deal with CIA influence on their own and help them achieve political autonomy from US meddling.Every Anti china action at state lvl involves cia.

Apart must from having to choose between the three Mekong countries and Vietnam, China and all ASEAN countries have no irreconcilable contradictions. China can solve the South China Sea Island problem with Malaysia and the Philippines through joint development (what China really cares about is Huangyan Island), and Vietnam dare not really fall to the USA. Therefore, China has enough patience in its exchanges with ASEAN.
 

AViet

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View attachment 813042
BrahMos missile. Image Credit: Creative Commons.

There has long been a strategic imbalance between India and China: Chinese forces on the India-China border are parked relatively close to the Indian heartland, while the reverse is not true. For example, the disputed border region of Ladakh is only 400 air miles from New Delhi – -and 3,500 miles from Beijing. At the same time, Indian planners worry that China’s growing navy will have ships and bases in the Indian Ocean, though Indian ships don’t patrol the South China Sea.

So how can India redress that strategic asymmetry? Maintaining an Indian military presence on China’s Pacific border would be diplomatically tricky and economically expensive. But what India can do is keep China off balance by supplying weapons to China’s neighbors, many of whom are rearming in response to Beijing’s growing military and more belligerent foreign policy. Indeed, China already does this by providing weapons and technical help – including ballistic missiles, jet fighters and tanks – to India’s rival Pakistan.


Last month, the Philippines signed a contract with India to purchase the BrahMos, a supersonic anti-ship missile jointly developed by Russia and India. Under the $375 million deal, the Coastal Defense Regiment of the Philippines Marines will receive three BrahMos batteries, which typically have three launchers each, plus various support vehicles. Based on Russia’s P-800 Oniks missile, the BrahMos has a speed of Mach 2.8 and a range of 298 kilometers (185 miles), though India recently tested an extended-range model with a reach of 450 kilometers (280 miles). In addition to coastal defense missions, India has tested land-attack, air-launched, and ship- and submarine-launched Brahmos variants.

For the Philippines, the deal is a chance to acquire an advanced missile that can both defend Philippine waters and provide some muscle to back Manila’s claims in the oil- and mineral-rich South China Sea, which is disputed by multiple nations, including China, Vietnam and Indonesia. While three batteries of missiles aren’t a mortal threat to the Chinese navy, they can at least impose a cost on any Chinese attempt to seize disputed islands such as Scarborough Shoal.


However, the real winner of the BrahMos deal is India. While India has been the second-largest arms importer in the world, it only ranks 24th in global arms exports, behind small nations such as South Africa, Canada and Switzerland. The Indian government has vowed to export $5 billion in arms by 2025, up from $151 million in 2020.

Not surprisingly, India’s media and defense industry hailed the Philippines deal. The Indian Express newspaper described it as a “major fillip to India’s hopes of becoming an exporter of defense platforms.” Atul Dinkar Rane, head of missile maker BrahMos Aerospace, said the export deal “opens the doors for all defense equipment” manufactured in India, which is in talks to sell the BrahMos to Vietnam and Indonesia.


Interestingly, Indian media frets that BrahMos exports may be blocked by the U.S. government’s Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA), which imposes sanctions on Russian defense companies. BrahMos is a joint venture between Russian defense firms and India’s state Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO).

While BrahMos is manufactured in India – a new factory in Lucknow will build 80 to 100 missiles per year – production depends on Russian components such as the ramjet engine and radar seekers. “Russia supplies around 65% of the components for the 3.9- ton BrahMos,” according to Indian news site The Wire. “Both sides had only recently resolved longstanding issues over the missile systems intellectual property rights, rendering it eligible for export. But neither side seems apparently to have factored in CAATSA.”

Whether Washington will jeopardize Indo-American relations over BrahMos remains to be seen. Not only is India emerging as a key U.S. ally against China, but America is increasingly replacing Russia as a supplier of arms for India, including P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol plans and AH-64 Apache attack helicopters.

But the most interesting question isn’t whether India will export arms to China’s neighbors, but what kind of weapons. While India has developed ballistic missiles as well as nuclear warheads, in 2016 the country joined the Missile Technology Control Regime, an informal international agreement to curb exports of missile technology. Yet this leaves open the possibility of India exporting a variety of missiles, including anti-ship and land-attack cruise missiles.

As India’s domestic arms industry increases over time in technological sophistication and export salesmanship, it’s possible that New Delhi will seek to counterbalance Chinese power on India’s border by exporting weapons to China’s Asian opponents.

A seasoned defense and national security writer and expert, Michael Peck is a contributing writer for Forbes Magazine. His work has appeared in Foreign Policy Magazine, Defense News, The National Interest, and other publications. He can be found on Twitter and Linkedin.


It is time to stop mentioning Vietnam in Brahmos-related news. We have developed a similar, subsonic cruise missile which can do the works of Brahmos (I know it is a supersonic). Now the missile, called VCM-01, is entering the mass production period since early 2022, as per some Internet sources (Vietnam People's army generally never officially publish such information)

The most important is that Vietnam seems not to depend on anyone for technologies, including the turbofan/turbojet (still unclear) engine / ramjet engine or any other technologies for the missile. We can produce as many as we want and can export to anyone, unlike India.
 
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retaxis

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typical low IQ indians don't even know that ASEAN is pro China including phillipines. Indians are the only real enemy of China at the moment. America is just a stooge who is entering into a civil war/balkanisation/demographic war. China doesn't need to do anything but watch America fall and India is just warm up for the Chinese and a confidence booster. Not even 1/10th the threat of Vietnam might be.
 

silverox

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The weapons made in India are of extremely poor quality. Helicopters exported by India almost killed the president of Uruguay, and the radar exported by India to Armenia could hardly find any targets.

Congratulate the Philippines on its good luck and suggest that the Philippines conduct a corruption investigation into behind the scenes transactions
 
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View attachment 813042
BrahMos missile. Image Credit: Creative Commons.

There has long been a strategic imbalance between India and China: Chinese forces on the India-China border are parked relatively close to the Indian heartland, while the reverse is not true. For example, the disputed border region of Ladakh is only 400 air miles from New Delhi – -and 3,500 miles from Beijing. At the same time, Indian planners worry that China’s growing navy will have ships and bases in the Indian Ocean, though Indian ships don’t patrol the South China Sea.

So how can India redress that strategic asymmetry? Maintaining an Indian military presence on China’s Pacific border would be diplomatically tricky and economically expensive. But what India can do is keep China off balance by supplying weapons to China’s neighbors, many of whom are rearming in response to Beijing’s growing military and more belligerent foreign policy. Indeed, China already does this by providing weapons and technical help – including ballistic missiles, jet fighters and tanks – to India’s rival Pakistan.


Last month, the Philippines signed a contract with India to purchase the BrahMos, a supersonic anti-ship missile jointly developed by Russia and India. Under the $375 million deal, the Coastal Defense Regiment of the Philippines Marines will receive three BrahMos batteries, which typically have three launchers each, plus various support vehicles. Based on Russia’s P-800 Oniks missile, the BrahMos has a speed of Mach 2.8 and a range of 298 kilometers (185 miles), though India recently tested an extended-range model with a reach of 450 kilometers (280 miles). In addition to coastal defense missions, India has tested land-attack, air-launched, and ship- and submarine-launched Brahmos variants.

For the Philippines, the deal is a chance to acquire an advanced missile that can both defend Philippine waters and provide some muscle to back Manila’s claims in the oil- and mineral-rich South China Sea, which is disputed by multiple nations, including China, Vietnam and Indonesia. While three batteries of missiles aren’t a mortal threat to the Chinese navy, they can at least impose a cost on any Chinese attempt to seize disputed islands such as Scarborough Shoal.


However, the real winner of the BrahMos deal is India. While India has been the second-largest arms importer in the world, it only ranks 24th in global arms exports, behind small nations such as South Africa, Canada and Switzerland. The Indian government has vowed to export $5 billion in arms by 2025, up from $151 million in 2020.

Not surprisingly, India’s media and defense industry hailed the Philippines deal. The Indian Express newspaper described it as a “major fillip to India’s hopes of becoming an exporter of defense platforms.” Atul Dinkar Rane, head of missile maker BrahMos Aerospace, said the export deal “opens the doors for all defense equipment” manufactured in India, which is in talks to sell the BrahMos to Vietnam and Indonesia.


Interestingly, Indian media frets that BrahMos exports may be blocked by the U.S. government’s Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA), which imposes sanctions on Russian defense companies. BrahMos is a joint venture between Russian defense firms and India’s state Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO).

While BrahMos is manufactured in India – a new factory in Lucknow will build 80 to 100 missiles per year – production depends on Russian components such as the ramjet engine and radar seekers. “Russia supplies around 65% of the components for the 3.9- ton BrahMos,” according to Indian news site The Wire. “Both sides had only recently resolved longstanding issues over the missile systems intellectual property rights, rendering it eligible for export. But neither side seems apparently to have factored in CAATSA.”

Whether Washington will jeopardize Indo-American relations over BrahMos remains to be seen. Not only is India emerging as a key U.S. ally against China, but America is increasingly replacing Russia as a supplier of arms for India, including P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol plans and AH-64 Apache attack helicopters.

But the most interesting question isn’t whether India will export arms to China’s neighbors, but what kind of weapons. While India has developed ballistic missiles as well as nuclear warheads, in 2016 the country joined the Missile Technology Control Regime, an informal international agreement to curb exports of missile technology. Yet this leaves open the possibility of India exporting a variety of missiles, including anti-ship and land-attack cruise missiles.

As India’s domestic arms industry increases over time in technological sophistication and export salesmanship, it’s possible that New Delhi will seek to counterbalance Chinese power on India’s border by exporting weapons to China’s Asian opponents.

A seasoned defense and national security writer and expert, Michael Peck is a contributing writer for Forbes Magazine. His work has appeared in Foreign Policy Magazine, Defense News, The National Interest, and other publications. He can be found on Twitter and Linkedin.

So That's why nowadays there are news circulating about DF 17 Missile acquisition by Pakistan.
 

Skywalker

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chinas tidsy bitsy enemies does not have a chance even with this so called supersonis missile especially knowingly that its orginated from the ganguland. Infact it will be a good target practice for the PLAAF even if they ever dare to try.
 

HttpError

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This is abviously a joke, but all the talk about how you guys served Abinandan that "fantastic tea", doesnt that make you guys the Chai walas?

Nope, serving Chai to our invited and uninvited guests is considered our "warm hospitality" but serving it as a profession would make us "Chai Walas".
 

xyxmt

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there only one little problem, China's enemies will never use those dabba weapons. But India's enemy that China is supplying would love to use it without a 2nd thought.
 

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