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India in Ladakh is breaking ‘China is invincible’ myth. Pentagon needs to catch up

mig25

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China’s People’s Liberation Army is in a bad temper. Although a part of this could be attributed to rising tensions along the Line of Actual Control in Ladakh, the majority of the briefings and commentaries from the PLA are focussed on the actions of the United States and its officials. These include a virtual declaration of imminent conflict by Defence Secretary Mark Esper, followed by a speech in Hawaii. In both, the overall message was that the US was ready for confrontation with a power that has the temerity to challenge a ‘near-peer’ rival and has little respect for other countries’ interests.

Then there was the Pentagon’s annual report on China, which provided the detailing of the threat. There’s more from Esper’s deputies, but this was enough for the PLA spokesperson to see red, even while Beijing’s media went ballistic.

For India, warnings of Chinese aggressiveness are superfluous given the ongoing conflict. Forecasts of superior Chinese power did not affect Delhi’s decision to meet the threat head-on, something that other countries need to acknowledge. China is certainly a power to reckon with, but it is not quite the dragon that the Pentagon – or Beijing – paints it to be.

When Esper poked China
What seems to have raised China’s ire is Esper’s bold statement: “Unlike America’s Armed Forces, the PLA is not a military that serves its nation, or a constitution – rather, it serves a political entity, the CCP”. Senior Colonel Ren Guoqiang, spokesperson for the Ministry of Defence, declared it “groundless nonsense” and cited the Chinese Constitution to declare the PLA “an armed force created and led by the CPC” with the goal of serving the people wholeheartedly.

One wonders what the families of those unnamed soldiers who died at Galwan on 15 June have to say about that. Esper then went on to call the Indo-Pacific “the epicenter of great power competition with China”. That bears thinking about, especially when the US has now declared the Chinese Navy as “the largest navy in the world“.

China’s range of woes
Maintaining the pace is going to be difficult in a pandemic-hit world. China is in a major food crisis as floods hit farmlands, pushing the second-largest wheat producer in the world to import heavily. Domestic soya prices doubled 30 per cent despite release of inventories. China cannot feed itself, and imports of US corn are at its highest since 2014.

Reports also point to 80 million jobless post pandemic even as another 8.7 million joined the ranks of job seekers this year. Experts note an even more serious development. Large banks such as China Construction Bank and the Bank of China have posted the biggest profit drops in a decade. Official figures put the drop in GDP at 6.8 per cent, with the actual figures likely to be higher, despite, or because of, the $559 billion revival package.

Heavy government borrowing has led to Standard & Poor estimating a rise in debt to GDP ratio to 273 per cent. Corporate debt, in particular, is massive, causing a closed loop of bad loans and bank stress. Additionally, data indicates delay in Belt and Road (BRI) projects due to the pandemic, including in Pakistan; cancellation of mega projects such as the $10 billion refinery by Saudi Arabia; and the declared thrust to ‘decouple’ from China by major powers.

None of this means that China is collapsing. But it does mean that Esper’s point about China being outwardly strong and inwardly weak may not be that far off the mark. If that is so, then the thrust to power may not be as rapid or as efficient as the Pentagon foresees.

It’s worth remembering that even as the Soviet Union collapsed, the Pentagon’s 1989 report was still extolling its prowess. Xinhua’s accusation that US ‘fear mongering’ is aimed at getting more appropriations from Congress may have some truth; but the threat is fleshed out by the PLA’s own aggressive actions.

The problem, however, is this. An exaggeration of the ‘Chinese threat’ may be counter-productive in keeping that country in check, particularly since the first talk of China’s ‘rising’ power emanated from Beijing itself. This perception is then used for ‘diplomatic dissuasion’.

Analysts need to break down the myth of an indomitable China, without, however, dismissing the very real threat. In some ways, that is what India’s armed forces are doing on the Ladakh border — showing resolution in defence, even while recognising that we are confronting a powerful enemy, who we once thought we could befriend.


 

Beast

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China’s People’s Liberation Army is in a bad temper. Although a part of this could be attributed to rising tensions along the Line of Actual Control in Ladakh, the majority of the briefings and commentaries from the PLA are focussed on the actions of the United States and its officials. These include a virtual declaration of imminent conflict by Defence Secretary Mark Esper, followed by a speech in Hawaii. In both, the overall message was that the US was ready for confrontation with a power that has the temerity to challenge a ‘near-peer’ rival and has little respect for other countries’ interests.

Then there was the Pentagon’s annual report on China, which provided the detailing of the threat. There’s more from Esper’s deputies, but this was enough for the PLA spokesperson to see red, even while Beijing’s media went ballistic.

For India, warnings of Chinese aggressiveness are superfluous given the ongoing conflict. Forecasts of superior Chinese power did not affect Delhi’s decision to meet the threat head-on, something that other countries need to acknowledge. China is certainly a power to reckon with, but it is not quite the dragon that the Pentagon – or Beijing – paints it to be.

When Esper poked China
What seems to have raised China’s ire is Esper’s bold statement: “Unlike America’s Armed Forces, the PLA is not a military that serves its nation, or a constitution – rather, it serves a political entity, the CCP”. Senior Colonel Ren Guoqiang, spokesperson for the Ministry of Defence, declared it “groundless nonsense” and cited the Chinese Constitution to declare the PLA “an armed force created and led by the CPC” with the goal of serving the people wholeheartedly.

One wonders what the families of those unnamed soldiers who died at Galwan on 15 June have to say about that. Esper then went on to call the Indo-Pacific “the epicenter of great power competition with China”. That bears thinking about, especially when the US has now declared the Chinese Navy as “the largest navy in the world“.

China’s range of woes
Maintaining the pace is going to be difficult in a pandemic-hit world. China is in a major food crisis as floods hit farmlands, pushing the second-largest wheat producer in the world to import heavily. Domestic soya prices doubled 30 per cent despite release of inventories. China cannot feed itself, and imports of US corn are at its highest since 2014.

Reports also point to 80 million jobless post pandemic even as another 8.7 million joined the ranks of job seekers this year. Experts note an even more serious development. Large banks such as China Construction Bank and the Bank of China have posted the biggest profit drops in a decade. Official figures put the drop in GDP at 6.8 per cent, with the actual figures likely to be higher, despite, or because of, the $559 billion revival package.

Heavy government borrowing has led to Standard & Poor estimating a rise in debt to GDP ratio to 273 per cent. Corporate debt, in particular, is massive, causing a closed loop of bad loans and bank stress. Additionally, data indicates delay in Belt and Road (BRI) projects due to the pandemic, including in Pakistan; cancellation of mega projects such as the $10 billion refinery by Saudi Arabia; and the declared thrust to ‘decouple’ from China by major powers.

None of this means that China is collapsing. But it does mean that Esper’s point about China being outwardly strong and inwardly weak may not be that far off the mark. If that is so, then the thrust to power may not be as rapid or as efficient as the Pentagon foresees.

It’s worth remembering that even as the Soviet Union collapsed, the Pentagon’s 1989 report was still extolling its prowess. Xinhua’s accusation that US ‘fear mongering’ is aimed at getting more appropriations from Congress may have some truth; but the threat is fleshed out by the PLA’s own aggressive actions.

The problem, however, is this. An exaggeration of the ‘Chinese threat’ may be counter-productive in keeping that country in check, particularly since the first talk of China’s ‘rising’ power emanated from Beijing itself. This perception is then used for ‘diplomatic dissuasion’.

Analysts need to break down the myth of an indomitable China, without, however, dismissing the very real threat. In some ways, that is what India’s armed forces are doing on the Ladakh border — showing resolution in defence, even while recognising that we are confronting a powerful enemy, who we once thought we could befriend.


Lol... How many PLA soldiers have u killed? Zero. While mighty IA lose 20 soldiers just thru bare knuckle brawl. :lol:
 

Jinn Baba

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I swear with the amount of BS Indians spew even I'm starting to think they won against China despite losing dozens of soldiers and thousands of sq km of land :lol:
 

beijingwalker

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China’s People’s Liberation Army is in a bad temper. Although a part of this could be attributed to rising tensions along the Line of Actual Control in Ladakh, the majority of the briefings and commentaries from the PLA are focussed on the actions of the United States and its officials. These include a virtual declaration of imminent conflict by Defence Secretary Mark Esper, followed by a speech in Hawaii. In both, the overall message was that the US was ready for confrontation with a power that has the temerity to challenge a ‘near-peer’ rival and has little respect for other countries’ interests.

Then there was the Pentagon’s annual report on China, which provided the detailing of the threat. There’s more from Esper’s deputies, but this was enough for the PLA spokesperson to see red, even while Beijing’s media went ballistic.

For India, warnings of Chinese aggressiveness are superfluous given the ongoing conflict. Forecasts of superior Chinese power did not affect Delhi’s decision to meet the threat head-on, something that other countries need to acknowledge. China is certainly a power to reckon with, but it is not quite the dragon that the Pentagon – or Beijing – paints it to be.

When Esper poked China
What seems to have raised China’s ire is Esper’s bold statement: “Unlike America’s Armed Forces, the PLA is not a military that serves its nation, or a constitution – rather, it serves a political entity, the CCP”. Senior Colonel Ren Guoqiang, spokesperson for the Ministry of Defence, declared it “groundless nonsense” and cited the Chinese Constitution to declare the PLA “an armed force created and led by the CPC” with the goal of serving the people wholeheartedly.

One wonders what the families of those unnamed soldiers who died at Galwan on 15 June have to say about that. Esper then went on to call the Indo-Pacific “the epicenter of great power competition with China”. That bears thinking about, especially when the US has now declared the Chinese Navy as “the largest navy in the world“.

China’s range of woes
Maintaining the pace is going to be difficult in a pandemic-hit world. China is in a major food crisis as floods hit farmlands, pushing the second-largest wheat producer in the world to import heavily. Domestic soya prices doubled 30 per cent despite release of inventories. China cannot feed itself, and imports of US corn are at its highest since 2014.

Reports also point to 80 million jobless post pandemic even as another 8.7 million joined the ranks of job seekers this year. Experts note an even more serious development. Large banks such as China Construction Bank and the Bank of China have posted the biggest profit drops in a decade. Official figures put the drop in GDP at 6.8 per cent, with the actual figures likely to be higher, despite, or because of, the $559 billion revival package.

Heavy government borrowing has led to Standard & Poor estimating a rise in debt to GDP ratio to 273 per cent. Corporate debt, in particular, is massive, causing a closed loop of bad loans and bank stress. Additionally, data indicates delay in Belt and Road (BRI) projects due to the pandemic, including in Pakistan; cancellation of mega projects such as the $10 billion refinery by Saudi Arabia; and the declared thrust to ‘decouple’ from China by major powers.

None of this means that China is collapsing. But it does mean that Esper’s point about China being outwardly strong and inwardly weak may not be that far off the mark. If that is so, then the thrust to power may not be as rapid or as efficient as the Pentagon foresees.

It’s worth remembering that even as the Soviet Union collapsed, the Pentagon’s 1989 report was still extolling its prowess. Xinhua’s accusation that US ‘fear mongering’ is aimed at getting more appropriations from Congress may have some truth; but the threat is fleshed out by the PLA’s own aggressive actions.

The problem, however, is this. An exaggeration of the ‘Chinese threat’ may be counter-productive in keeping that country in check, particularly since the first talk of China’s ‘rising’ power emanated from Beijing itself. This perception is then used for ‘diplomatic dissuasion’.

Analysts need to break down the myth of an indomitable China, without, however, dismissing the very real threat. In some ways, that is what India’s armed forces are doing on the Ladakh border — showing resolution in defence, even while recognising that we are confronting a powerful enemy, who we once thought we could befriend.


Indian garbage news channel again, I never knew that China was invincible in Indians mind.
 

My-Analogous

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China’s People’s Liberation Army is in a bad temper. Although a part of this could be attributed to rising tensions along the Line of Actual Control in Ladakh, the majority of the briefings and commentaries from the PLA are focussed on the actions of the United States and its officials. These include a virtual declaration of imminent conflict by Defence Secretary Mark Esper, followed by a speech in Hawaii. In both, the overall message was that the US was ready for confrontation with a power that has the temerity to challenge a ‘near-peer’ rival and has little respect for other countries’ interests.

Then there was the Pentagon’s annual report on China, which provided the detailing of the threat. There’s more from Esper’s deputies, but this was enough for the PLA spokesperson to see red, even while Beijing’s media went ballistic.

For India, warnings of Chinese aggressiveness are superfluous given the ongoing conflict. Forecasts of superior Chinese power did not affect Delhi’s decision to meet the threat head-on, something that other countries need to acknowledge. China is certainly a power to reckon with, but it is not quite the dragon that the Pentagon – or Beijing – paints it to be.

When Esper poked China
What seems to have raised China’s ire is Esper’s bold statement: “Unlike America’s Armed Forces, the PLA is not a military that serves its nation, or a constitution – rather, it serves a political entity, the CCP”. Senior Colonel Ren Guoqiang, spokesperson for the Ministry of Defence, declared it “groundless nonsense” and cited the Chinese Constitution to declare the PLA “an armed force created and led by the CPC” with the goal of serving the people wholeheartedly.

One wonders what the families of those unnamed soldiers who died at Galwan on 15 June have to say about that. Esper then went on to call the Indo-Pacific “the epicenter of great power competition with China”. That bears thinking about, especially when the US has now declared the Chinese Navy as “the largest navy in the world“.

China’s range of woes
Maintaining the pace is going to be difficult in a pandemic-hit world. China is in a major food crisis as floods hit farmlands, pushing the second-largest wheat producer in the world to import heavily. Domestic soya prices doubled 30 per cent despite release of inventories. China cannot feed itself, and imports of US corn are at its highest since 2014.

Reports also point to 80 million jobless post pandemic even as another 8.7 million joined the ranks of job seekers this year. Experts note an even more serious development. Large banks such as China Construction Bank and the Bank of China have posted the biggest profit drops in a decade. Official figures put the drop in GDP at 6.8 per cent, with the actual figures likely to be higher, despite, or because of, the $559 billion revival package.

Heavy government borrowing has led to Standard & Poor estimating a rise in debt to GDP ratio to 273 per cent. Corporate debt, in particular, is massive, causing a closed loop of bad loans and bank stress. Additionally, data indicates delay in Belt and Road (BRI) projects due to the pandemic, including in Pakistan; cancellation of mega projects such as the $10 billion refinery by Saudi Arabia; and the declared thrust to ‘decouple’ from China by major powers.

None of this means that China is collapsing. But it does mean that Esper’s point about China being outwardly strong and inwardly weak may not be that far off the mark. If that is so, then the thrust to power may not be as rapid or as efficient as the Pentagon foresees.

It’s worth remembering that even as the Soviet Union collapsed, the Pentagon’s 1989 report was still extolling its prowess. Xinhua’s accusation that US ‘fear mongering’ is aimed at getting more appropriations from Congress may have some truth; but the threat is fleshed out by the PLA’s own aggressive actions.

The problem, however, is this. An exaggeration of the ‘Chinese threat’ may be counter-productive in keeping that country in check, particularly since the first talk of China’s ‘rising’ power emanated from Beijing itself. This perception is then used for ‘diplomatic dissuasion’.

Analysts need to break down the myth of an indomitable China, without, however, dismissing the very real threat. In some ways, that is what India’s armed forces are doing on the Ladakh border — showing resolution in defence, even while recognising that we are confronting a powerful enemy, who we once thought we could befriend.


India, please keep repeating Galwan and each one 1000 sq km. Mighty Indian have lot of land to offer.
 

TNT

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Indian media in full sprint to stupidity further the already dumb and stupid nation. Isnt there a single sane indian who can ask what is it exactly that india has done? Their soldiers moved few hundred meters and the whole country is doing nagan dance. Seriously indians are so stupid it just feels unreal.
 

Figaro

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Yes because India understands the Chinese military better than the Pentagon :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

The arrogance and delusions of the Indians is simply unparalleled ... pathetic people
 

FCPX

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This "article" is exactly the reason why much of Indian MSM has become a propaganda wing of the GOI/BJP.
 

Rollno21

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a day late and a dollar short as usual.

peace has already broken out, fat shah has been told to keep his ugly gob shut and India is accepting the new status quo and is looking for ways to roll back anti-China sanctions
The status co is good for India after all we have gained part of what we lost during 62 war
 

redtom

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The day when both sides shot, the Indian seemed to disappear. Upon seeing the news of the negotiations between the two sides, a large number of Indians showed their fearlessness. :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
 

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