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India can be pivot in US-China rivalry, get benefits from both

Discussion in 'Central & South Asia' started by Indo-guy, Feb 6, 2014.

  1. Indo-guy

    Indo-guy SENIOR MEMBER

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    India can be pivot in US-China rivalry, get benefits from both - The Times of India


    NEW DELHI: It is in India's interest to ruthlessly junk remnants of its cold war era "moralistic" foreign policy and impenitently take fullest advantage of a sharpening US-China rivalry to extract benefits from both camps, noted policy guru Kishore Mahbubani has said.

    Arguing that India needs to dispassionately exploit emerging geo-political equations, Mahbubani said India should resist the temptation of being part of US-led efforts to contain China and instead actively seek close ties with Beijing.

    Delivering the IDSA K Subrahmanyam lecture provocatively titled "Should India be Cunning", Mahbubani pitched for a guilt-free approach to foreign policy and said India should guard against being taken for granted.

    He said the Chinese leadership was smart enough to respond to India's gestures and will do a lot to keep its Asian neighbour happy and ensure careful management of disputes along the border so that tensions don't spill out of hand.

    "Some stupid Chinese commander who pitched a tent in a disputed area should not be allowed to upset relations. A closer relationship with China is in India's interests so that it gets the best deal for itself," Mahbubabi said.

    The well-known academic, who is dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, said, "China too has no desire to alienate India. Hence, India should maintain a steadfast policy of good relations with all great powers."

    Calling for a hard-headed foreign policy, Mahbunani argued "means are not moral, goals are" and said "all nations are cunning." India must not be squeamish and pursue its national interest in a guilt-free and pragmatic manner.

    He said India is sailing into a geo-political sweet spot and must make the most of it saying, "It is clear that several powers, including the US and Japan, and perhaps also Russia and Europe, are concerned about the rise of China."

    Mahbubani elaborated on his lecture during a discussion moderated by Sanjaya Baru, former media advisor to PM Manmohan Singh, when he dealt with why many nations feel India is the best candidate to balance China.

    "The courtship is coming," he said, pointing to back to back visits by the Japanese emperor and prime minister and said closer trade and investment links will work to India's advantage.

    Asked if a foreign policy can be devoid of moral moorings, Mahbubani said US has a track record of supporting the most number of dictators and while a democratic system is an asset, banking on good actions is not enough.

    "You can suffer if depend on good intentions alone. Protecting your country's interests is the morally right thing to do," Mahbubani said.

    Pointing to an inexorable shift of power from the west to the east, Mahbubani reminded his audience that US had consistently preferred China over India for much of India's post-Independence history. Things have changed only recently.

    He said India should be equally cunning is dealing with Pakistan and suggested that a lesson can be drawn from China's handling of its ties with Taiwan where it cultivated people to people contacts even when official ties were frosty.

    "I have found a lot of interest in Pakistan about Indian culture and films. India should make full use of its soft power," he said.
     
  2. Chinese-Dragon

    Chinese-Dragon RETIRED TTA

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    That is clever. And pragmatic.

    In a new multi-polar world, the idea of joining this "camp" or the other camp, will be a thing of the past.

    The only one who really stands to lose out in a new multi-polar world is America, since they prefer having a uni-polar world, with themselves as the sole unilateral decision maker.
     
  3. Android

    Android BANNED

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    and also from Japan and South Korea :D
     
  4. halupridol

    halupridol SENIOR MEMBER

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    [​IMG] :enjoy::enjoy::enjoy:
     
  5. Indo-guy

    Indo-guy SENIOR MEMBER

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    Kishore Mahbubani
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search
    Kishore Mahbubani
    [​IMG]
    Mahbubani at the World Economic Forum
    annual meeting, 2011
    Born(1948-10-24) October 24, 1948 (age 65)
    Singapore
    ResidenceSingapore
    CitizenshipSingaporean
    EducationB.A. (Philosophy)
    M.A. (Philosophy)
    Alma materUniversity of Singapore
    Dalhousie University
    OccupationAcademian, and a diplomat
    Known forPresident of the U.N. Security Council
    (2001 - 2002)
    Former ambassador to the United Nations
    (1984 - 1989, then 1998 - 2004)
    Kishore Mahbubani (born October 24, 1948, Singapore) is a notable academic and former Singaporean diplomat. He is currently Professor in the Practice of Public Policy and Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore.[1]
    From 1971 to 2004 he served in the Singaporean Foreign Services, becoming Singapore's Permanent Representative to the United Nations. In that role he served as President of the United Nations Security Council in January 2001 and May 2002.[2]
    Contents
    [hide]
    Early life and education[edit]
    Mahbubani is of ethnic Sindhi descent. Educated at St. Andrew's School, Mahbubani was awarded the President's Scholarship in 1967 and graduated with a First Class Honours degree in Philosophy from the University of Singapore (now the National University of Singapore) in 1971. He received a Masters degree in Philosophy in 1976 and an Honorary Doctorate in 1995 from Dalhousie University in Canada.
    Career[edit]
    Political career[edit]
    After his graduation in 1971 he joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Singapore, and his earlier postings included Cambodia (where he served during the war in 1973-74), Malaysia and Washington, DC. He was appointed the Permanent Secretary at the Foreign Ministry from 1993 to 1998. Later, he became Singapore's Permanent Representative to the United Nations. In that role he served as President of the United Nations Security Council in January 2001 and May 2002.
    Academic career[edit]
    His academic career began when he was appointed as the Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore. He is also a Professor in the Practice of Public Policy. In addition, he was a fellow at the Center for International Affairs at Harvard University in 1991-92.[2]
    Author[edit]
    Mahbubani is best known outside Singapore for his books Can Asians Think? (published and translated in Singapore, Canada, US, Mexico, India, China Myanmar, Turkey and Malaysia), Beyond The Age Of Innocence: Rebuilding Trust between America and the World (published and translated in the US and China), and The New Asian Hemisphere: the irresistible shift of global power to the East (published and translated in the US, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Egypt, China, Korea, Japan, Indonesia, Italy, Taiwan and Vietnam).[3][4][5] His articles have appeared in several leading journals and newspapers outside of Singapore, such as Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, the Washington Quarterly, Survival, American Interest, the National Interest, Time, Newsweek, the Financial Times and New York Times.
    His latest book is entitled The Great Convergence: Asia, the West, and the Logic of One World (Public Affairs). In it he describes how the world has seen more positive change in the past 30 years than the past 300 years. By prescribing pragmatic solutions for improving the global order - including a 7-7-7 formula that may finally break the logjam in the UN Security Council - Mahbubani maps a road away from the geopolitical contours of the nineteenth century.[6] The book was widely reviewed, including in the Wall Street Journal[7] and the Washington Post.[8]
    Boards and honours[edit]
    He continues to serve in Boards and Councils of several institutions in Singapore, Europe and North America, including the Yale President's Council on International Activities (PCIA), Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs, Indian Prime Minister’s Global Advisory Council, University of Bocconi International Advisory Committee, World Economic Forum - Global Agenda Council on China and Chairman of the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize Nominating Committee.
    He was conferred the Public Administration Medal (Gold) by the Singapore Government in 1998. The Foreign Policy Association Medal was awarded to him in New York in June 2004 with the following opening words in the citation: “A gifted diplomat, a student of history and philosophy, a provocative writer and an intuitive thinker”. Prof Mahbubani was also listed as one of the top 100 public intellectuals in the world by Foreign Policy and Prospect magazines in September 2005, and included in the March 2009 Financial Times list of Top 50 individuals (including Barack Obama, Wen Jiabao and Nicolas Sarkozy) who would shape the debate on the future of capitalism. Mahbubani was selected as one of Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers in 2010 and 2011.[9]
    Personal life[edit]
    Mahbubani and his wife have three children and continues to reside in Singapore.

    True ! multi polar world is in greater interest of whole world and only forces which will be averse to this will be those who are sole superpowers like US .
    But china is other superpower in making ....
    and frankly speaking power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely .
    so even china won't be ready to accommodate wannabe Centre of powers like India , Japan , Brazil etc in future and this is only natural ....
    Nobody likes competition ...
    I personally believe India should maintain working and friendly relations with all countries .
    No need to hedge one country against another as this article actually seems to suggest to further own interests ... as it may turn harmful in long run , however intuitive it may look initially
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2014
  6. Indo-guy

    Indo-guy SENIOR MEMBER

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  7. Chinese-Dragon

    Chinese-Dragon RETIRED TTA

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    I agree. Power does corrupt.

    However, I believe that in the next few decades, it will be impossible for any one country to be a "superpower", i.e. a global hegemon.

    A multi-polar world is the only rational outcome.
     
  8. Dem!god

    Dem!god SENIOR MEMBER

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    [​IMG]
    NEW DELHI: It is in India's interest to ruthlessly junk remnants of its cold war era "moralistic" foreign policy and impenitently take fullest advantage of a sharpening US-China rivalry to extract benefits from both camps, noted policy guru Kishore Mahbubani has said.

    Arguing that India needs to dispassionately exploit emerging geo-political equations, Mahbubani said India should resist the temptation of being part of US-led efforts to contain China and instead actively seek close ties with Beijing.

    Delivering the IDSA K Subrahmanyam lecture provocatively titled "Should India be Cunning", Mahbubani pitched for a guilt-free approach to foreign policy and said India should guard against being taken for granted.

    He said the Chinese leadership was smart enough to respond to India's gestures and will do a lot to keep its Asian neighbour happy and ensure careful management of disputes along the border so that tensions don't spill out of hand.

    "Some stupid Chinese commander who pitched a tent in a disputed area should not be allowed to upset relations. A closer relationship with China is in India's interests so that it gets the best deal for itself," Mahbubabi said.

    The well-known academic, who is dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, said, "China too has no desire to alienate India. Hence, India should maintain a steadfast policy of good relations with all great powers."

    Calling for a hard-headed foreign policy, Mahbunani argued "means are not moral, goals are" and said "all nations are cunning." India must not be squeamish and pursue its national interest in a guilt-free and pragmatic manner.

    He said India is sailing into a geo-political sweet spot and must make the most of it saying, "It is clear that several powers, including the US and Japan, and perhaps also Russia and Europe, are concerned about the rise of China."

    Mahbubani elaborated on his lecture during a discussion moderated by Sanjaya Baru, former media advisor to PM Manmohan Singh, when he dealt with why many nations feel India is the best candidate to balance China.

    "The courtship is coming," he said, pointing to back to back visits by the Japanese emperor and prime minister and said closer trade and investment links will work to India's advantage.

    Asked if a foreign policy can be devoid of moral moorings, Mahbubani said US has a track record of supporting the most number of dictators and while a democratic system is an asset, banking on good actions is not enough.

    "You can suffer if depend on good intentions alone. Protecting your country's interests is the morally right thing to do," Mahbubani said.

    Pointing to an inexorable shift of power from the west to the east, Mahbubani reminded his audience that US had consistently preferred China over India for much of India's post-Independence history. Things have changed only recently.

    He said India should be equally cunning is dealing with Pakistan and suggested that a lesson can be drawn from China's handling of its ties with Taiwan where it cultivated people to people contacts even when official ties were frosty.

    "I have found a lot of interest in Pakistan about Indian culture and films. India should make full use of its soft power," he said.,,,,,:partay::partay::partay:

    India can be pivot in US-China rivalry, get benefits from both - The Times of India
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2014
  9. Indo-guy

    Indo-guy SENIOR MEMBER

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    Indeed an era of global hegemon is over ...thanks to rise of China and re emergence of Russia .
    It is likely that the second tier powers like India , Japan , Brazil etc will rise .

    we have already seen that transition happening .

    As these countries grow and garner clout and exert themselves ...it will bring some balance of powers in world politics .

    I am personally against the ' military ' grouping and camping of nations ...because it has risk of setting chain reaction ... which can lead to WWI or WW II like situation ...
     
  10. Dem!god

    Dem!god SENIOR MEMBER

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  11. Robinhood Pandey

    Robinhood Pandey SENIOR MEMBER

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  12. Aarush

    Aarush FULL MEMBER

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    till date India's non alignment policy is doing well. be it with signing 123 agreement with USA and taking its advantages and on the other hand developing close relationship with china on trade and economic front. india has to maintain the close relationship with china and at the same time to balance the aggression of china, india has to increase his power and at diplomatic front should look at the east asian countries.
    in world politics, there is no such thing called love affairs, only national interest persists.
     
  13. Dem!god

    Dem!god SENIOR MEMBER

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  14. airpower183

    airpower183 BANNED

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    Don't' be fool, if you play with giants you will get stepped on.
     
  15. Syama Ayas

    Syama Ayas ELITE MEMBER

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    Mahbubani needs to look at Pakistan and North Korea to check what great benefits China can offer. Our currently foreign policy is good enough based on wikileaks

    Speaking from experience I see ;)