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India backs AL, US-EU-UN backs democracy, rights

hembo

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That actually gives legitimacy to Bangladesh to manipulate politics in the Northeast and West Bengal given that BJP is instigating anti-Bangladeshi sentiments in the region.

Try that and face the fallouts.... Your former masters tried something similar since 1990s and have been seeing the fall outs till now... Khaleda bibi has already faced the fallouts of sheltering north-east extremist... Try it again, we dare you.. The lee-way given to Hasina bibi for being compliant will vanish within no time, along with the so called economic growth of last 10-15 years...
 

bluesky

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Two legitimate political parties allied with each other and formed a government, I don't see any mistake here.
BNP is a progressive party, not a Mullah party. Jamaat is a Mullah Party. It was OK if they joined hands to win the election.

But, it was completely wrong by BNP to include two ministers from Jamaat. This BNP act was the reason that it fell. Jamaat has been suffering since then and BNP is also suffering almost similarly.

BNP-Jamaat govt was certainly not a holy alliance. It is responsible for the demise of the BNP or we can say this is why BNP lost popularity among the intellectual people. The result of an election is decided by this group of people.

No wonder, the BNP of today does not lean towards Jamaat although I think it will cause BNP to lose the next election. However, I believe finally Hasina will allow Jamaat to contest the election independently which will result in a reduced number of votes cast for the BNP.

Jamaatis will then not vote for BNP. Win or lose they will vote for their own party which will reduce votes for the BNP.
 

Species

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Try that and face the fallouts.... Your former masters tried something similar since 1990s and have been seeing the fall outs till now... Khaleda bibi has already faced the fallouts of sheltering north-east extremist... Try it again, we dare you.. The lee-way given to Hasina bibi for being compliant will vanish within no time, along with the so called economic growth of last 10-15 years...

You don't have to worry, we will make sure there are enough protected areas and sanctuaries for the northeast tribals to roam around without any encroachment to their habitat.
 

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BNP is a progressive party, not a Mullah party. Jamaat is a Mullah Party. It was OK if they joined hands to win the election.

But, it was completely wrong by BNP to include two ministers from Jamaat. This BNP act was the reason that it fell. Jamaat has been suffering since then and BNP is also suffering almost similarly.

BNP-Jamaat govt was certainly not a holy alliance. It is responsible for the demise of the BNP or we can say this is why BNP lost popularity among the intellectual people. The result of an election is decided by this group of people.

No wonder, the BNP of today does not lean towards Jamaat although I think it will cause BNP to lose the next election. However, I believe finally Hasina will allow Jamaat to contest the election independently which will result in a reduced number of votes cast for the BNP.

Jamaatis will then not vote for BNP. Win or lose they will vote for their own party which will reduce votes for the BNP.

You do know that Jamaat has several DU/BUET graduates in their ranks?

I would rather be interested in the credentials of the two ministers than their party affiliations. Jamaat owned financial institutions are (were) some of the most efficient in the country.

Whether the BNP-Jamaat alliance was a success or not is a different debate, we are talking about legitimacy here.

Which intellectuals are you talking about? Shahriar Kabir? lol The real intellectuals with credibility actually criticized the crackdown on Jamaat, warning that it might push them underground. Then, we saw the rise of so called Neo-JMB.

As I said, BNP relied too heavily on Jamaat and that was their mistake. Shibir went rogue and that cost BNP its popularity.
 

hembo

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You don't have to worry, we will make sure there are enough protected areas and sanctuaries for the northeast tribals to roam around without any encroachment to their habitat.

You are most welcome to try any mischiefs. Last time it helped solving NE's insurgency problem. This time, it will help immensely in expeditious solving of north-east's illegal migrant problem. Keep additional islands ready before you start. You must have had good enough experience in this feld with the rohingias.
 

bluesky

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You do know that Jamaat has several DU/BUET graduates in their ranks?

I would rather be interested in the credentials of the two ministers than their party affiliations. Jamaat owned financial institutions are (were) some of the most efficient in the country.

Whether the BNP-Jamaat alliance was a success or not is a different debate, we are talking about legitimacy here.

Which intellectuals are you talking about? Shahriar Kabir? lol The real intellectuals with credibility actually criticized the crackdown on Jamaat, warning that it might push them underground. Then, we saw the rise of so called Neo-JMB.

As I said, BNP relied too heavily on Jamaat and that was their mistake. Shibir went rogue and that cost BNP its popularity.
Mullahs are good at preaching. They should stay in that business. Politics need no interference from fundamental religious books that can be interpreted in any way a man wants.

Formal education is not the yardstick. Important is the vision of how to industrialize a country or infuse technologies into society.

No Mullah party is able to bypass his obsolete books. They find solutions to all issues in those books written by a group of Mullahs who knew nothing of an overpopulated complex society.

Why do you think a 21st-century BD should choose those obsolete verses with no functions in today's complex world?
 
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Mystic League

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India backs AL, US-EU-UN backs democracy, rights​

by M Serajul Islam | Published: 00:00, Mar 12,2023


196552_112.jpg



THE United States, the European Union and the United Nations remained passive about Bangladesh’s controversial national elections held in 2014 and 2018 while India fully supported the retention of power by the Awami League through those polls. The west remained passive understandably because they did not want the Bangladesh Nationalist Party-Jamaat alliance to win because they believed that would encourage the Islamic fundamentalist forces. They did not care about democracy, human rights or electoral rights of the people of Bangladesh.

They, thus, ignored that the Awami League won the 2014 election without any contest in 153 of the 300 seats of the national assembly. India also interfered in that election to keep the Awami League in power through the visit of its foreign secretary Sujata Singh to Dhaka immediately before the election. The US-EU-UN and India again ignored as the Awami League returned to power for a third consecutive time through the 2018 national election when ballot boxes were stuffed in the Awami League’s favour by its supporters allegedly with the help of the law enforcement agencies the midnight before the election day that earned it the nickname of ‘midnight election’.

The US-EU-UN dramatically changed policies regarding Bangladesh since the Biden administration came to power and the war on terror ended, both events occurring in 2021. They have made democracy and human rights indispensable in their relations with Bangladesh with an emphasis on Bangladesh’s next general election, which is now less than a year away. The trio wants it to be free, fair and participatory, unlike the 2014 and the 2018 elections, with the freedom of civil society and the media fully assured.

India remained silent as its erstwhile allies during Bangladesh’s 2014 and 2018 elections were emphasising the indispensability of democracy and human and electoral rights in Bangladesh’s governance. It finally came behind the Awami League government with the official visit of its current foreign secretary Vinay Mohan Kwatra to Dhaka in February 14–15.

The Indian foreign secretary conveyed prime minister Narendra Modi’s total support in the leadership of prime minister Sheikh Hasina. He also conveyed the Indian prime minister’s invitation to her to attend the G20 Summit that India would be hosting in New Delhi in September as head of a ‘guest country.’ He ignored completely, no doubt at New Delhi’s instruction, the current politics in Bangladesh.

Notably, the Indian foreign secretary did not bring the Awami League, which has been in its tightest corner since coming to power in January 2009, any political support. The opposition parties led by the Bangladesh Nationalist Party have taken to the streets to bring the regime down peacefully or force it to hold the next election under the caretaker government system that it does not want for fear of losing. There is no third party like there was the Jatiya Party in 2014 to give legitimacy to the next election if the Bangladesh Nationalist Party was to boycott it.

The pressure by the US-EU-UN for a free, fair and participatory election has left the AL regime in dire need of external assistance. Russia and China are friendly towards the regime but they do not believe in playing favourites in the politics of an independent and sovereign country.

Therefore, the Awami League-led regime and its supporters, happy that they no doubt were with Narendra Modi’s confidence in Sheikh Hasina’s leadership and the invitation for her to attend the G20 Summit, were, nevertheless, expecting India’s political support as it had given in 2014 and more. The Awami League-led regime’s current political predicament is much worse than what it was leading to Bangladesh’s 2014 election. Narendra Modi’s messenger to Dhaka, thus, did not fulfil the AL regime’s political expectations.

New Delhi, nevertheless, underlined through Vijay Mohan Kwatra’s visit that it prefers the Awami League to conduct its bilateral relations with Bangladesh. It, thus, also underlined that it has little interest in democracy and human and electoral rights. New Delhi has good reasons to want to conduct bilateral relations with Bangladesh only with the Awami League-led regime. Its ties with it are historically embedded in Bangladesh’s liberation war that the Awami League had led and India helped.

New Delhi provided sanctuary for 10 million Bangladeshis who had fled to India in 1971 and allowed Bangladesh’s government-in-exile to be established on Indian soil. It also successfully argued Bangladesh’s case with the international community as an act of war by Pakistan on India to save it from facing the Biafran fate that was quashed by the Nigerians as a case of secession. Finally, Indian Defence Forces with the Bangladesh freedom fighters defeated the Pakistan military.

India sacrificed more than 3,000 soldiers in that war in which many hundreds of thousands of Bangladeshis embraced martyrdom. These sacrifices were made meaningful by the establishment of Bangladesh as an independent and sovereign nation based on democracy, human rights and right of the people to choose their government. These elements of democracy and human and electoral rights have since been etched in Bangladesh’s psyche as the spirit of 1971.

It is, therefore, an irony that the US and west European governments and the United Nations that had sided with Pakistan’s military in 1971 on the inviolability of the territorial integrity and sovereignty of a UN member are supporting democracy and human rights in the present-day Bangladesh as indispensable. And India which fought the Pakistan military with the Bangladesh freedom fighters in 1971 for the democratic and human rights of Bangladeshis is now in denial of the struggle of the majority of the same people for these same rights.

A counsellor of the US state department, Derek Chollet, was also in Dhaka at the same time Vinay Mohon Kwatra was in the city, one of the many senior US officials who visited Bangladesh in recent times pursuing issues of human rights, democracy and free and fair elections in Bangladesh. New Delhi’s silence over issues that its erstwhile allies in Bangladesh are currently pursuing exposed its current role more embarrassingly to the majority of Bangladeshis. It also once more brought into focus India’s strange policy of conducting its bilateral relations with Bangladesh on a country-to-political party basis, a foreign policy not to be seen anywhere else in the world.

From New Delhi’s perspective though, the New Delhi with Awami League foreign policy has paid India handsomely. Since coming to power in January 2009, the Awami League has unilaterally given India its two major concessions without seeking reciprocity, concessions that were among the major reasons for India’s intervention in the Bangladesh liberation war, namely a total security guarantee that the Bangladesh territory would not be used for secessionist/terrorist attacks on India’s fragile northeast states and, second, land transit from mainland India to these states.

The Awami League-led government, nevertheless, expected India would reciprocate on the crucial water issues that it did not. The Teesta deal which was ready for signature as early as September 2011 is still pending. Meanwhile, senior Bharatiya Janata Party leaders, including those highly placed in government, are openly insulting and abusing Bangladesh’s predominantly Muslim population to energise its huge Hindu fundamentalist base under the party’s official Hindutva mantra.

As a consequence, India, once friend of all Bangladeshis across its political divide, is no longer so and the goodwill of Bangladeshis for India is on its way to exhaustion. It is also placing the Awami League-led government that went against the public opinion of the majority of Bangladeshi to placate India in a difficult position politically. If the next election is held freely and fairly, the Awami League’s opponent would likely win power on the India factor alone and India’s failure to reciprocate to the Awami League.

Regional politics is also not the same as it was leading to Bangladesh’s 2014 and 2018 elections. China has, meanwhile, made massive strides in all South Asian countries, and very significantly in Bangladesh. India’s ability to do pretty much what it wanted in the past in Bangladesh’s electoral politics is now not so, particularly because its powerful allies such as the United States, the European Union and the United Nations have parted ways with it on Bangladesh.

Nevertheless, India and Bangladesh need each other for reasons of history, geopolitics and economics with strong bilateral relations based on reciprocity. It is also time for India to focus on Bangladesh and not on any particular political party for conducting its bilateral relations which is on a slippery slope.

M Serajul Islam is a former career ambassador.
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Eradication of Minorities is tantamount among Fanatic Islamists, it is definitely in Western and Indian interest to see to it that the minority Hindus and Christians are not oppressed by Bangladeshis. It is hard to stop to them even in India with Hinduism being the majority religion out here. China is the one country who know how to handle Muslims by their training camps in XInjiang and forcing them to calm down their fanaticism on a daily basis. Kinda keeping that in mind I could see why the west and India want the Awami-league to stay in power.
 

Bilal9

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Try that and face the fallouts.... Your former masters tried something similar since 1990s and have been seeing the fall outs till now... Khaleda bibi has already faced the fallouts of sheltering north-east extremist... Try it again, we dare you.. The lee-way given to Hasina bibi for being compliant will vanish within no time, along with the so called economic growth of last 10-15 years...

Hemant Dada - I don't know if you are being serious.

If Bangladesh wanted to - they could easily infuse money into the politics of these poor states and craft outcomes. The fact they have not so far, is only our wish not to rankle Indian govt. - nothing more.

Last I checked, all it takes is money to buy politicians, or did we come up with any novel revolutionary ideas ?

The day when Indian influence could affect (or rather - destroy) economic growth in Bangladesh is gone, that ship sailed long ago. You are the seller, we are the customer, and that too at our choice. That choice can vanish at our behest. Then the Indian HC in Dhaka will come running but won't get an appointment with the PM. It has happened before, many times.

Indian Govt. has about US$ 50 Billion to lose yearly by trying a showdown with Bangladesh, but I'm not going to hold my breath on that one. Try it anytime you guys wish.

Eradication of Minorities is tantamount among Fanatic Islamists, it is definitely in Western and Indian interest to see to it that the minority Hindus and Christians are not oppressed by Bangladeshis. It is hard to stop to them even in India with Hinduism being the majority religion out here. China is the one country who know how to handle Muslims by their training camps in XInjiang and forcing them to calm down their fanaticism on a daily basis. Kinda keeping that in mind I could see why the west and India want the Awami-league to stay in power.

The West doesn't give a hoot what Indian interest is - contrary to Godi media propaganda. The West are too busy with their own agendas.

Like I said above, the day when Indian influence could affect anything in Bangladesh has long passed.

If you want to keep deluding yourselves, it is your choice.

You are officially poorer than us - which should have been a wake-up call. Just stating cold-hard facts here.

In Bangladesh - Hindus live far better than they do even in bordering Indian states. Just ask any educated Bangladeshi Hindu.

Godi Media propaganda only goes so far.
 
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Hellfire2006

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That actually gives legitimacy to Bangladesh to manipulate politics in the Northeast and West Bengal given that BJP is instigating anti-Bangladeshi sentiments in the region.
Well , the only way you can do that is through illegal immigration which you folks excel at.
 

game

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India backs AL, US-EU-UN backs democracy, rights​

by M Serajul Islam | Published: 00:00, Mar 12,2023


196552_112.jpg



THE United States, the European Union and the United Nations remained passive about Bangladesh’s controversial national elections held in 2014 and 2018 while India fully supported the retention of power by the Awami League through those polls. The west remained passive understandably because they did not want the Bangladesh Nationalist Party-Jamaat alliance to win because they believed that would encourage the Islamic fundamentalist forces. They did not care about democracy, human rights or electoral rights of the people of Bangladesh.

They, thus, ignored that the Awami League won the 2014 election without any contest in 153 of the 300 seats of the national assembly. India also interfered in that election to keep the Awami League in power through the visit of its foreign secretary Sujata Singh to Dhaka immediately before the election. The US-EU-UN and India again ignored as the Awami League returned to power for a third consecutive time through the 2018 national election when ballot boxes were stuffed in the Awami League’s favour by its supporters allegedly with the help of the law enforcement agencies the midnight before the election day that earned it the nickname of ‘midnight election’.

The US-EU-UN dramatically changed policies regarding Bangladesh since the Biden administration came to power and the war on terror ended, both events occurring in 2021. They have made democracy and human rights indispensable in their relations with Bangladesh with an emphasis on Bangladesh’s next general election, which is now less than a year away. The trio wants it to be free, fair and participatory, unlike the 2014 and the 2018 elections, with the freedom of civil society and the media fully assured.

India remained silent as its erstwhile allies during Bangladesh’s 2014 and 2018 elections were emphasising the indispensability of democracy and human and electoral rights in Bangladesh’s governance. It finally came behind the Awami League government with the official visit of its current foreign secretary Vinay Mohan Kwatra to Dhaka in February 14–15.

The Indian foreign secretary conveyed prime minister Narendra Modi’s total support in the leadership of prime minister Sheikh Hasina. He also conveyed the Indian prime minister’s invitation to her to attend the G20 Summit that India would be hosting in New Delhi in September as head of a ‘guest country.’ He ignored completely, no doubt at New Delhi’s instruction, the current politics in Bangladesh.

Notably, the Indian foreign secretary did not bring the Awami League, which has been in its tightest corner since coming to power in January 2009, any political support. The opposition parties led by the Bangladesh Nationalist Party have taken to the streets to bring the regime down peacefully or force it to hold the next election under the caretaker government system that it does not want for fear of losing. There is no third party like there was the Jatiya Party in 2014 to give legitimacy to the next election if the Bangladesh Nationalist Party was to boycott it.

The pressure by the US-EU-UN for a free, fair and participatory election has left the AL regime in dire need of external assistance. Russia and China are friendly towards the regime but they do not believe in playing favourites in the politics of an independent and sovereign country.

Therefore, the Awami League-led regime and its supporters, happy that they no doubt were with Narendra Modi’s confidence in Sheikh Hasina’s leadership and the invitation for her to attend the G20 Summit, were, nevertheless, expecting India’s political support as it had given in 2014 and more. The Awami League-led regime’s current political predicament is much worse than what it was leading to Bangladesh’s 2014 election. Narendra Modi’s messenger to Dhaka, thus, did not fulfil the AL regime’s political expectations.

New Delhi, nevertheless, underlined through Vijay Mohan Kwatra’s visit that it prefers the Awami League to conduct its bilateral relations with Bangladesh. It, thus, also underlined that it has little interest in democracy and human and electoral rights. New Delhi has good reasons to want to conduct bilateral relations with Bangladesh only with the Awami League-led regime. Its ties with it are historically embedded in Bangladesh’s liberation war that the Awami League had led and India helped.

New Delhi provided sanctuary for 10 million Bangladeshis who had fled to India in 1971 and allowed Bangladesh’s government-in-exile to be established on Indian soil. It also successfully argued Bangladesh’s case with the international community as an act of war by Pakistan on India to save it from facing the Biafran fate that was quashed by the Nigerians as a case of secession. Finally, Indian Defence Forces with the Bangladesh freedom fighters defeated the Pakistan military.

India sacrificed more than 3,000 soldiers in that war in which many hundreds of thousands of Bangladeshis embraced martyrdom. These sacrifices were made meaningful by the establishment of Bangladesh as an independent and sovereign nation based on democracy, human rights and right of the people to choose their government. These elements of democracy and human and electoral rights have since been etched in Bangladesh’s psyche as the spirit of 1971.

It is, therefore, an irony that the US and west European governments and the United Nations that had sided with Pakistan’s military in 1971 on the inviolability of the territorial integrity and sovereignty of a UN member are supporting democracy and human rights in the present-day Bangladesh as indispensable. And India which fought the Pakistan military with the Bangladesh freedom fighters in 1971 for the democratic and human rights of Bangladeshis is now in denial of the struggle of the majority of the same people for these same rights.

A counsellor of the US state department, Derek Chollet, was also in Dhaka at the same time Vinay Mohon Kwatra was in the city, one of the many senior US officials who visited Bangladesh in recent times pursuing issues of human rights, democracy and free and fair elections in Bangladesh. New Delhi’s silence over issues that its erstwhile allies in Bangladesh are currently pursuing exposed its current role more embarrassingly to the majority of Bangladeshis. It also once more brought into focus India’s strange policy of conducting its bilateral relations with Bangladesh on a country-to-political party basis, a foreign policy not to be seen anywhere else in the world.

From New Delhi’s perspective though, the New Delhi with Awami League foreign policy has paid India handsomely. Since coming to power in January 2009, the Awami League has unilaterally given India its two major concessions without seeking reciprocity, concessions that were among the major reasons for India’s intervention in the Bangladesh liberation war, namely a total security guarantee that the Bangladesh territory would not be used for secessionist/terrorist attacks on India’s fragile northeast states and, second, land transit from mainland India to these states.

The Awami League-led government, nevertheless, expected India would reciprocate on the crucial water issues that it did not. The Teesta deal which was ready for signature as early as September 2011 is still pending. Meanwhile, senior Bharatiya Janata Party leaders, including those highly placed in government, are openly insulting and abusing Bangladesh’s predominantly Muslim population to energise its huge Hindu fundamentalist base under the party’s official Hindutva mantra.

As a consequence, India, once friend of all Bangladeshis across its political divide, is no longer so and the goodwill of Bangladeshis for India is on its way to exhaustion. It is also placing the Awami League-led government that went against the public opinion of the majority of Bangladeshi to placate India in a difficult position politically. If the next election is held freely and fairly, the Awami League’s opponent would likely win power on the India factor alone and India’s failure to reciprocate to the Awami League.

Regional politics is also not the same as it was leading to Bangladesh’s 2014 and 2018 elections. China has, meanwhile, made massive strides in all South Asian countries, and very significantly in Bangladesh. India’s ability to do pretty much what it wanted in the past in Bangladesh’s electoral politics is now not so, particularly because its powerful allies such as the United States, the European Union and the United Nations have parted ways with it on Bangladesh.

Nevertheless, India and Bangladesh need each other for reasons of history, geopolitics and economics with strong bilateral relations based on reciprocity. It is also time for India to focus on Bangladesh and not on any particular political party for conducting its bilateral relations which is on a slippery slope.

M Serajul Islam is a former career ambassador.
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Rule no 1: The change should come from with in .
when people have revolted many Govts of collapsed..just last year you have seen what happened in Sri Lanka

External Powers always want to meddle in other countries to derive benefits or when they say any potential threats

Russia meedles with US, China meddles with Taiwan and all of its neigbours..same with Egypt,Suadi,Iran ,Israel ,India,Turkey or Paksitan
US meddles with all countries

Instead of whining on others for your miseries and faults, try to close the fault lines or fight back !
 

Bilal9

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I feel like bangali people of WB don't really care about illegal migration as they see Bangladeshis as their kin

It's people from rest of the India who make it an issue

Exactly. majority of educated WB people are quite liberal minded (other than a few malcontent trouble-maker Hindus who got driven out of Bangladesh who support BJP). BJP people are furious that they could not turn that state (WB) into another BJP stronghold, like they did with less educated and industrialized states like UP, Bihar and Assam.

WB benefits tremendously in trade and tourism with Bangladesh, cultural values of people in both places are quite similar and there are many many common cultural reference points such as food, media, drama, literature, festivals etc.

WB folks understand that the whole BJP and Modi racket is an artificially created scheme which is only to benefit leaders like Modi and his Seth friends financially. The more Hindu Muslim division and nationalist jingoism (i.e. defence spending), the better for Modi's businesspeople to make hay while the sun shines.

In general - majority of educated WB folks don't see eye-to-eye with BJP folks, WB (and Bangladesh) values are too secular while those of BJP folks are not (majority of these Hindutva extremists belong to UP, Bihar, Maharashtra and Gujarat states).
 
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Hellfire2006

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I feel like bangali people of WB don't really care about illegal migration as they see Bangladeshis as their kin

It's people from rest of the India who make it an issue
Let's assume for a sec that you're right, does that make illegal immigration into another sovereign nation justified, and it's not just Bengal, we're also talking about Assam, Tripura, Meghalaya, Mizoram. None of these states like immigrants trust me. They don't even tolerare internal immigrants , Bangladeshis are a far cry lol

Exactly. majority of educated WB people are quite liberal minded (other than a few malcontent trouble-maker Hindus who got driven out of Bangladesh who support BJP). BJP people are furious that they could not turn that state into another BJP stronghold, like they did with less educated states like UP, Bihar and Assam.

WB benefits tremendously in trade and tourism with Bangladesh, cultural values of people in both places are quite similar and there are many many common cultural reference points such as food, media, drama, literature, festivals etc.

WB folks understand that the whole BJP and Modi racket is an artificially created scheme which is only to benefit leaders like Modi and his Seth friends financially. The more Hindu Muslim division and nationalist jingoism (i.e. defence spending), the better for Modi's businesspeople to make hay while the sun shines.

In general - majority of educated WB folks don't see eye-to-eye with BJP folks, WB (and Bangladesh) values are too secular while those of BJP folks are not (majority of these Hindutva extremists belong to UP, Bihar, Maharashtra and Gujarat states).
So you do agree that Bangladeshis immigrate illegally , but you're justifying it by saying that Bengalis don't mind
 

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