• Thursday, December 12, 2019

Incredible India - Tourism places

Discussion in 'General Photos & Multimedia' started by ashok mourya, Jan 4, 2015.

  1. Dragon Ball

    Dragon Ball FULL MEMBER

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    Harihar Fort Trek


    Kalavantin Durg Trek
     
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  2. swnjo

    swnjo FULL MEMBER

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    A song for Aiko/ Dzükou valley.(Nagaland-Manipur)

     
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  3. swnjo

    swnjo FULL MEMBER

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    Faar away in north east India, is located Mechuka town.Not much of a touristy place but just in case any one wants to give a visit may watch this vlog.
     
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  4. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 BANNED

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    Jan 21, 2018 14:41 IST

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    Master weaver Haji Anwar Ahmad, 60, lays out a pink silk Banarasi sari similar to the one said to have been woven by him, and worn by Anushka Sharma at her reception. In the times of lehengas and lighter weaves, the actor’s choice of this classic handloom has generated conversation and demand, but its weavers find themselves being flushed out by a changing market and technological obsolescence. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
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    Barkhat, a weaver works with a handloom, the traditional tool for making Banarasi silk fabric. In localities where the clacking of handlooms once signalled the craft, the powerloom’s buzz has grown increasingly louder. 72-year-old Maqbool Hasan, a master weaver, remembers a time when his family owned 500 handlooms. “Now we have only 200 looms. No one wants to weave on a handloom anymore,” he said. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
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    Coils of silk yarn line a store’s shelves in Varanasi. The first signs of change came in 1985 as weavers reeled from a spike in silk prices and synthetic viscose yarn began taking over markets. The powerloom’s appearance on the scene soon after, changed the business ever since. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
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    A weaving shuttle sits on an unfinished silk sari at a workshop. With electricity subsidies for powerloom users, competition from Surat’s textile mills, increased yarn prices and a faster, cheaper product from the newer looms, the traditional handloom industry has found it harder to hold on to its market share. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
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    Master weaver Mohammad Sayeed with his wife Rukhsana, in his workshop. Meagre earnings have also deterred those engaged. A weaver’s share is based on the price of product. Most weavers say they earn Rs 300-350 a day, but because the fabric length may take anything from 15 days to a month or more on the handloom, monthly incomes range around Rs 6000. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
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    Mohammed Imraan shows his powerloom at a a workshop. The complexity of the design often demands additional weavers or the help of the women in the household to manage yarn to save time, but this comes with no extra income. In contrast the powerloom generates twice the income of a handloom, and is less laborious. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
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    Mohammed Imraan shows his powerloom at a a workshop. The complexity of the design often demands additional weavers or the help of the women in the household to manage yarn to save time, but this comes with no extra income. In contrast the powerloom generates twice the income of a handloom, and is less laborious. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
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    Prior to his election, the Prime Minister had promised to boost the industry, but the trade facilitation centre inaugurated later has not benefitted weavers. Master weavers and handloom traders had even put together a proposal for the government with ideas like designers working with Banarasi fabric, making their collections available locally and celebrity endorsements. But none of it has materialised yet. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
     
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  5. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 BANNED

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    Photos: Delhi’s Nizamuddin Dargah dons spring’s yellow for Sufi Basant
    Jan 22, 2018 16:41 IST
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    The dargah of Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya is abuzz, and decked in yellow for Basant Panchami. Sufi Basant as it is popularly known, dates back to the 12th century when celebrated poet Amir Khusro dedicated songs of spring to his khwaja (spiritual master) Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)
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    Every year as winter walks away to make space for Delhi’s brief spring, people mark the shift of the season by offering yellow mustard flowers --or even yellow marigolds -- at the shrine of the aforementioned 14th century Sufi saint. Devotees come dressed in yellow to mark the day. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)
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    The tale goes that Hazrat Nizamuddin’s young nephew Taqiuddin Nooh had died and grief stricken for six months the saint withdrew from society and left his followers thinking of ways to cheer him up. One day as Amir Khusro sat near Arab ki Sarai, he saw some women in yellow carrying marigold flowers and singing devotional songs. When asked the reason, they said that it was goddess Kalkaji’s day. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)
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    Khusrow is then said to have donned a yellow ghagra, covered his head with a yellow chunari , and burst into spring songs with a dholak around his neck for his master. Hazrat Nizamuddin broke into laughter at the sight and thus ended his mourning. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)
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    It has been more than seven centuries since but the congregation continues to celebrate Sufi Basant in remembrance of the incident. Special qawwali programmes are organised on the day and spring songs are dedicated to Hazrat Nizamuddin. The qawwali which usually happens in the courtyard, sees an exception for Sufi Basant and is taken to the tombs of Khusro and Hazrat Nizamuddin. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

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    Sufi Basant falls on the third day of Jumada-al-awwal, the fifth month of the Islamic calendar. This year it was celebrated on January 21. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)
     
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  6. swnjo

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  7. Che palle

    Che palle FULL MEMBER

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    Haven't been to India yet, but Taj Mahal and Hyderabad are on my go-to list
     
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  8. Dragon Ball

    Dragon Ball FULL MEMBER

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    Tripura
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  9. Hindustani78

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    Ministry of Tourism
    09-March, 2018 16:23 IST
    Music series under Incredible India Heritage Series in Delhi, Varanasi and Kochi

    First event to be on 10th March 2018 at Red Fort, New Delhi

    The Ministry of Tourism is organizing a music series under the Incredible India Heritage Series in Delhi, Varanasi and Kochi, which are important tourist centres of the country. This music series organised through SPIC MACAY would be held over a period of 6 weekends with the objective to promote the rich cultural heritage of the country and to reinforce the principle of ‘Tourism for All’. The artists, who would be performing in the programme series include Hindustani as well Carnatic Vocalists and Instrumentalists. Similarly the best of our Folk traditions will be showcased by performances of Qawwali, Kabir Gayan, Choir, Baul and various folk art forms from across the nation.


    The Delhi leg of the series starts on 10th March, 2018 at Red Fort with performance by Ustad Shahid Parvez Khan, a sitar player of Hindustani classical music, from the Etawah Gharana, followed by Dr. Ashwini Bhide-Deshpande, a Hindustani classical music vocalist from Mumbai. She pursues the Jaipur-Atrauli Gharana. 11th March will see performances by Parvathy Baul, a Baul folk singer, musician and storyteller from Bengal and one of the leading Baul musicians in India. The Warsi Brothers from Rampur (Uttar Pradesh) will perform Qawwali who are the grand sons of Padmashri Aziz Ahmed Khan Warsi, the world famous Qawwal. Their Qawwali bears a distinct impression of the gayeki of Delhi Gharana and is noted for its melody and improvisation. They are recognised specially for their Traditional Sufiana Qawwali, Ghazal, Thumri, Bhajan and Classical Bandish.


    Violinist Dr. L. Subramaniam, Mridangam player Dr. Umayalpuram K. Sivaraman, and Santoor player Pt. Shiv Kumar Sharma will perform at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun's Tomb on 17th March, 2018; while the Capital City Minstrels (Choir) and Smt. Malini Awasthi (Thumri) will perform on 18th March, 2018.


    The detailed schedule of the programme is as below:



    Incredible India Heritage series events schedule



    City
    Venue
    Date & Time
    Artist

    DELHI
    Red Fort


    Sat, 10 March, 2018 6:00 PM
    Ustad Shahid Parvez (Sitar) (Padma Shri)
    Vid. Ashwini Bhide Deshpande (Vocal) (SNA)

    Sun, 11 March, 2018 6:00 PM
    Qawwali - Rampur Warsi Brothers
    Baul Sangeet - Smt. Parvathy Baul

    Arab ki Sarai, Humayun's Tomb

    Sat, 17 March, 2018 6:00 PM
    Dr. L. Subramaniam (Violin)(Padma Bhushan)
    Dr. Umayalpuram K. Sivaraman (Mridangam) (Padma Vibhushan)

    Pt. Shiv Kumar Sharma (Santoor) (Padma Vibhushan)

    Sun, 18 March, 2018 6:00 PM
    Capital City Minstrels (Choir)
    Folk & Light Classical - Smt. Malini Awasthi (Padma Shri)

    *****
     
  10. Bombaywalla

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  11. Bombaywalla

    Bombaywalla SENIOR MEMBER

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  12. swnjo

    swnjo FULL MEMBER

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    :p:P:p:P
     
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  13. August is Fun

    August is Fun BANNED

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    Improve infrastructures in north east India.
     
  14. swnjo

    swnjo FULL MEMBER

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    Dekho hamari clean and green (for most part) N.E :enjoy:









     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2018
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  15. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 BANNED

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    Photos: Kashmir’s Hari Parbat Fort to be centre of Srinagar city tourism
    Mar 28, 2018 13:54 IST
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    Perched atop the Koh-i-Maran hill also known as Predemna Peet, overlooking Srinagar is the Hari Parbat fort. Its first fortifications and outer wall, built by the Mughal emperor Akbar in 1590 as part of a new capital, never saw completion and the fort as it stands today was constructed in the 19th century under the reign of Shuja Shah Durrani. (Waseem Andrabi / HT Photo)
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    Reaching the fort itself is a 15 minute climb from the point where vehicles aren’t allowed and the hill itself is favourable to almond trees, seen in abundance. In a bid to boost this central location in the valley, state tourism minister Tassaduq Mufti has directed efforts to turn the 200-year old fort into the cynosure of tourism in Srinagar city. (Waseem Andrabi / HT Photo)
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    A view of the Mata Ambay temple inside the fort. A protected monument under the Archaeological Survey of India, the fort shares the hill with sites of religious significance: A Parvati temple on the western slope and the Khwaja Makhdoom Sahib and Akhund Mullah Shah shrines on the hill’s southern slope. (Waseem Andrabi / HT Photo)
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    The hill and the fort atop can be made out from nearly anywhere in Srinagar city and the elevated location of the fort in turn lends itself to panoramic views of the city and Dal Lake. (Waseem Andrabi / HT Photo)
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    Used by various rulers over the centuries as a display of might, access to the fort was barred in the 1990s after the eruption of militant unrest in Kashmir. Guarded by personnel of the Central Reserve Police Force(CRPF) today, the fort complex was opened again in 2007 after a span of 17 years. (Waseem Andrabi / HT Photo)
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    The fort houses four huge towers, two ponds and lawns. Plans for highlighting the location as a tourist site have called for a light and sound show at its grounds. (Waseem Andrabi / HT Photo)


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    Tourism officials are banking on cultural shows, archival presentations and 3D projection mapping at the Hari Parbat fort to stimulate footfall from local as well as foreign tourists and add to the state’s tourism showreel. (Waseem Andrabi / HT Photo)
     
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