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In The Highest of Tradition

Raja Porus

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Today's Parade Commander, Brigadier Arsalan Tariq is a war wounded general officer belonging to 6th Punjab Regiment (The Quaid Guard Regiment).

20220323_150851.jpg


While I was searching about why the 6th Punjab is called the Quaid Guard, I found this picture of The Founding Father with the officers of this regiment:
20220323_151935.jpg


The 6th Punjab faught first in Rann of Kutch( where Major Nadir, parade cmdr's uncle) during a patrol captured several Indians and then in Grand Slam.
But that is not where it ends...

The parade commander is son of Lt Gen Tariq Pervez(R) and nephew of Major Nadir Pervez both of 6th Punjab. His father, Gen Tariq joined the unit five days after the war of 65 started. During 71 war Gen Pervez was posted to Lahore, but he chose to be with his own regiment in East Pakistan. After putting up series of bold rear guard actions with the likes of Brig T.M, they took up defensive positions as ordered. But after the surrender they were taken to prison camps. However these daring souls couldn't be kept imprisoned for long and after digging a tunnel for about six months they finally got through. Then they journeyed from one end of the Subcontinent (Bangladesh) to its north western most edge (Nepal). The stories of there escape; from going for several days without food to watching "Pakeeza" is a beautiful tale worthy of a classic.
At the end Gen Tariq along with Major Nazir amd several others made it back and were awarded with Sitara e Jurat.
Major Nazir's sister was married to Gen. Tariq.
Living upto the great traditions of his family and keeping their values in mind, Brigadier Arsalan faught bravely during COIN ops( @PanzerKiel can you tell which) and was injured as well.
I'm attaching following pictures of Nawai waqt that I found:
epaper_img_1576388115.jpeg
epaper_img_1576388125.jpeg

Notice how strikingly similar the father and son are.
IMG_20220323_165339.jpg

(Great personality)
Only if our media knew about our
real heroes and their stories.
@fatman17 @Joe Shearer
 
Last edited:

khail007

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Today's Parade Commander, Brigadier Arsalan Tariq is a war wounded general officer belonging to 6th Punjab Regiment (The Quaid Guard Regiment).

View attachment 826488

While I was searching about why the 6th Punjab is called the Quaid Guard, I found this picture of The Founding Father with the officers of this regiment:
View attachment 826490

The 6th Punjab faught first in Rann of Kutch and then in Grand Slam.
But that is not where it ends...

The parade commander is son of Lt Gen Tariq Pervez(R) and nephew of Major Nadir Pervez both of 6th Punjab. His father, Gen Tariq joined the unit five days after the war of 65 started. During 71 war Gen Pervez was posted to Lahore, but he chose to be with his own regiment in East Pakistan. After putting up series of bold rear guard actions with the likes of Brig T.M, they took up defensive positions as ordered. But after the surrender they were taken to prison camps. However these daring souls couldn't be kept imprisoned for long and after digging a tunnel for about six months they finally got through. Then they journeyed from one end of the Subcontinent (Bangladesh) to its north western most edge (Nepal). The stories of there escape; from going for several days without food to watching "Pakeeza" is a beautiful tale worthy of a classic.
At the end Gen Tariq along with Major Nazir amd several others made it back and were awarded with Sitara e Jurat.
Major Nazir's sister was married to Gen. Tariq.
Living upto the great traditions of his family and keeping their values in mind, Brigadier Arsalan faught bravely during COIN ops( @PanzerKiel can you tell which) and was injured as well.
I'm attaching following pictures of Nawai waqt that I found:
View attachment 826496 View attachment 826495
Notice how strikingly similar the father and son are.

Only if our media knew about our real heroes and their stories.

If I am not wrong, 'Fateh-Garh Se Farrar' by Inayat Ullah is the book in which complete details of the adventure were narrated by ( Capt. Noor Ahmed). Here is the part of the title page:

Fateh Garh.PNG
 

Joe Shearer

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But after the surrender they were taken to prison camps. However these daring souls couldn't be kept imprisoned for long and after digging a tunnel for about six months they finally got through. Then they journeyed from one end of the Subcontinent (Bangladesh) to its north western most edge (Nepal).
Just for the sake of accuracy, the Indian Army took great care not to leave any Pakistani service man exposed to the anger of the Bangladeshis. AFAIK (remember), the senior officers of flag rank were briefly housed in Fort William, and then transferred to one of the MP cantonments, perhaps Jhansi or Jabalpur. The enlisted men were kept in Gwalior and some in Delhi.
If I am not wrong, 'Fateh-Garh Se Farrar' by Inayat Ullah is the book in which complete details of the adventure were narrated by ( Capt. Noor Ahmed). Here is the part of the title page:

View attachment 826513
Where was this? Is an English translation available? There is a Fatehgarh in the UP, somewhere near Lucknow, and not too far from the Nepal border, that border, as you know, is unguarded and free for passage in either direction. I can walk across tomorrow if I want, for example; no papers needed. At least that's how it used to be.
 

khail007

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Where was this? Is an English translation available? There is a Fatehgarh in the UP, somewhere near Lucknow, and not too far from the Nepal border, that border, as you know, is unguarded and free for passage in either direction. I can walk across tomorrow if I want, for example; no papers needed. At least that's how it used to be.
I will search, if the English version is available then let you know.
Yes, it is the same Fatehgarh near Lucknow, also mentioned the 'Rajput Regimental Center'. Below is the indicated area:

FatehGarh.PNG
 

Joe Shearer

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I will search, if the English version is available then let you know.
Yes, it is the same Fatehgarh near Lucknow, also mentioned the 'Rajput Regimental Center'. Below is the indicated area:

View attachment 826738
Same place. About a 100 miles to the border. OTOH, if there was an alarm out, there would have been people looking for them, but on the other, this is one of the most populated parts of UP. Just next door to the Rohilla territory; Rampur was one of the centres of the Rohillas, who practically swung the Battle of Panipat in favour of Abdali, in part by their own efforts in supporting Abdali, in part by persuading the Nawab of Oudh to come in with Abdali. For tall, fair men to mingle the locals would not have been hugely difficult; chances of detection would have been high, but mixing with the locals would have been easy.

The escape must have been fascinating.

After getting into Nepal, the rest would have been easy, of course. The Pakistani diplomatic representation was very active, and used to handling documentation, funding and financing, and quick transit very easily.
 

Raja Porus

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Just for the sake of accuracy, the Indian Army took great care not to leave any Pakistani service man exposed to the anger of the Bangladeshis. AFAIK (remember), the senior officers of flag rank were briefly housed in Fort William, and then transferred to one of the MP cantonments, perhaps Jhansi or Jabalpur. The enlisted men were kept in Gwalior and some in Delhi.
True. I've heard first hand accounts by many family members, officers as well as soldiers, of the Indian treatment. Manekshaw was a man of honour.

After getting into Nepal, the rest would have been easy, of course. The Pakistani diplomatic representation was very active, and used to handling documentation, funding and financing, and quick transit very easily.
Yep they sent one officer, who was married, to the Paksitani embassy.

Is an English translation available?
I tried finding but unfortunately, no. Urdu version is available.
 

aniqazam

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he's a kohatian n a good man, and his wound was more of a scratch hence the red stripe.......warnah the really wounded get the yellow stripe
Are you out of your mind?
A scratch!
Have you ever felt that “scratch” on yourself or a loved one during nights, sometimes in -40° celsius while standing at the top of a ridge when the whole world sleeps.

FYI: There’re the set standards (SOPs) as to how big a wound makes you eligible of:
1. Red Ribbon;
2. Yellow Ribbon;
3. Sitara e Jurat (SJ) or any other medal; or
3. You embrace “Shahadat” during an operation, and you get a medal up to a Nishan e Haider (NH) for your bravery.
 

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